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What makes you feel good

ckdgedmom's picture
ckdgedmom
Posts: 166
Joined: Oct 2017

So ladies what do you do that makes you feel good?  Especially when undergoing treatments...

I thought it might be nice to share the "little things we do" that improve our wellness or feel like a treat when things are hard during chemo/radiation/post treatment

For me my almost daily practice of yoga is what keeps me going...I love the mind/body connection and it feels so good to move. I was unable to practice when I was doing taxol/carboplatin (but I took spin class when I felt well) but during radiation yoga really made me feel better.

during my chemo time it felt really good to get foot massages and pedicures. It felt like a special treat and my feet would swell so the foot massages were wonderful and helped reduce swelling...

So what helped you ladies?

What made you feel "more like yourself"...

hugs to all on this board

xoxo

Anice

ConnieSW's picture
ConnieSW
Posts: 1456
Joined: Jun 2012

I had never had one before. My daughter arranged for one for me and it was heaven. Had no idea what I was missing. It's been a long while since I last had one. I think it's about time to treat myself. 

MAbound
Posts: 889
Joined: Jun 2016

My mom's hobby was researching our family connections (this was well before computers). I inherited all the information she had gathered, but never had the time to get into it. Well, during chemo I had very little energy to do much of anything, but was bored none-the-less. I had to dig up some family medical history prior to seeing a geneticist and that kind of got me going on continuing her hobby. My dad's side of the family came over through NY in the late 1800's from Bohemia (Austria-Hungary) and the language issue is a real problem for going back further, but my mom has relatives I've got traced back to one of the ships of Puritans that came over shortly after the Mayflower and were amoung the first settlers in Conneticut. One has his name engraved on a monument to first settlers in New Haven. It's really interesting stuff as there are also revolutionary and civil war veterans, California gold rush participants, original Mormans and first settlers in what was newly opened to settlement Indian Territory in central Wisconsin among my ancestors. I've got a lot of work to do digging deeper, following leads on European histories and organizing it all, but when I need something to distract me from focusing too much on cancer, working on this stuff does the trick and takes me to my happy place. Once I get settled in MA in a few years (God willing) I'm hoping to get all that I've gathered into a book to gift my kids and grandkids with. It keeps me looking forward.

EZLiving66's picture
EZLiving66
Posts: 1363
Joined: Oct 2015

The Guldan side of my family came from Bohemia and you're right, that's hard to trace. So much information was lost during WWI and WWII.  But, I did find an organization in Chicago that helped me.  I don't have the info right now because it's all packed ready to go to Florida, but when I find it, I'll let you know.  Did you do the Ancestry DNA?  It's really cool because it gives you lists of who could be your cousins going all the way back to fifth and sixth cousins. Who knows, we might be long lost Wisconsin relatives - LOL!!

Love,

Eldri

MAbound
Posts: 889
Joined: Jun 2016

Haven't come across that surname yet, but I've barely scatched the surface yet with my dad's side of the family (Johanek) who settled in the Shawano area after leaving NYC. Wouldn't that be something if our families intersected at some point? I'm already dealing with such a wealth of information and pictures that I haven't gotten around to the DNA thing or even uploading to Ancestry. com. It's a big job just getting it into some kind of order so I can find things when I need them! 

pinky104
Posts: 574
Joined: Feb 2013

I haven't been on here in several days, so I just saw your comment about ancestry tonight.  I wasn't into ancestry back when I had my first bout of cancer.  Back then, my hobbies were reading and doing a crossword puzzle book that a friend gave me when I came home from the hospital.  I got into ancestry three or four years ago.  You and I might actually be related.  My father's ancestors came over on the Mayflower.  My mother's were Puritans in the Plymouth colony a little less than 20 years later the Mayflower landed.  I'm not on ancestry now, but I remember that some of the family moved to other states, and I believe New Haven was also where one of my ancestors had a name on a statue of founding fathers.  If I remember correctly, his name was Nathaniel Bearding.   Some of my ancestors were Quakers who held the first Quaker meetings in New England.  I had a slew of relatives in various military battles, including a Captain in the Revolutionary War and a minuteman who helped Paul Revere warn of the coming of the British.  I was able to trace one line of the family back into the 1400's, but the further back I went, the more sketchy the information got.  Before I traced my ancestry, I got my DNA tested and learned that I am 100% European although my ancestors came from a lot of different countries across the continent ranging from England and Ireland to NW Russia.  Now that I've had my genomic testing done, I wonder how my genetic mutations fit in with my countries of origin. 

I can't say as I did much for fun with my recurrence this year.  I found that I had to skip most of the fun things I normally do, like craft fairs and county fairs, because of my low blood counts.  I did skip one week of chemo to take a vacation to southern Maine and I went to local lakes a couple of times, but most of my time was spent trying to catch up on things I needed to do around the house.  I live in a log home, which holds the heat in more during the summer, so that made me lose my ambition to do housework pretty fast.  I spent a lot of time sitting in front of an air conditioner watching TV, to be perfectly honest.  I probably shouldn't admit that.     

MAbound
Posts: 889
Joined: Jun 2016

See, this is what makes this hobby so absolutely fascinating and absorbing. You just never know who you are going to connect with doing it! I wish I could work on this full time, but being betwixt and between living in two households really limits when and how much I can work on it for now. I haven't come across the name Bearding that I can recall, but I'll keep an eye out for it and we'll see if there's that connection.

Donna Faye's picture
Donna Faye
Posts: 267
Joined: Jan 2017

I was given an adult coloring set and became addicted! So friends and family gave me all sorts of things to color - a plate, a pillow, placemats, and more books. It was so good for having something to do that was fun and relaxing. I used the back of the pages as stationery and wrote letters to friends and family.

Lou Ann M's picture
Lou Ann M
Posts: 996
Joined: Feb 2015

Me too, I love it and find it relaxing. Also drawing. And of course my puppy, Lilly,  she is so goofy she keeps me smiling

Hugs and prayers, Lou Ann

TeddyandBears_Mom's picture
TeddyandBears_Mom
Posts: 1564
Joined: Jun 2015

Before, during and after.... My two little boys. My dogs keep me entertained and while on chemo helped to get me up and walking when I just didn't want to do it. I had a hard time concentrating so reading was too difficult. I would read short articles but couldn't focus on a full book. I watched a lot of television and still watch more than I probably should.

Also, on my few good days, I cooked for the days that I wasn't going to be able to. And, I cleaned my house. Anything that I was physically able to do to make me feel more normal.

Love and Hugs,

Cindi

CheeseQueen57's picture
CheeseQueen57
Posts: 820
Joined: Feb 2016

i call it my survivor bracelet. Through all my treatments my friends and family helped me fill my bracelet. For each treatment I added a charm. Unfortunately my bracelet is full now but it kept me motivated to get through my frontline treatment 

EZLiving66's picture
EZLiving66
Posts: 1363
Joined: Oct 2015

My acupressure really helped.  She did that plus massage and I always felt so much better.  Unfortunately here in northern Wisconsin, I can't find anybody that practices it.  However, I'm sure I can find someone near our home in Florida. I am going to try a pedicure/foot massage to see if I can tolerate it with my neuropathy.  Parts of my feet are numb but other parts are super sensitive. I also had my little Spunky boy who quietly laid by my side when I was the most sick.  Just feeling that little guy next to me made me feel better.  I remember one time when I was just lying there, crying, he put his little paw on my cheek - what a comfort!

I also colored but it was for my physical therapy.  I had to bring in my book every time I went so the therapist could see the progress I was making.  It really was remarkable from the first page to the last how much better I got.

I think we all deserve a little pampering with what we've been through.

Love,

Eldri

ckdgedmom's picture
ckdgedmom
Posts: 166
Joined: Oct 2017

ConnieSW you deserve a massage! Go get one!

MABound what a cool way to spend time---I love the idea of the book for your kids and grandkids

I love the coloring idea...I like to be creative!  I design and make costumes for a high school so that is where 90% of my creativity is spent these days

EZLiving try the foot massage or pedicure---just let the person doing it know where your sensitive spots are

Cheese---love the bracelet idea! How cool...

I love to cook so that is sort of therapy for me. When I was going through chemo I would spend the day before cooking so I had healthy things to eat when I wouldn't feel like cooking.

Yoga has truly been my saving thing.  My radiology oncologist kept telling me to "slow down" during my first round of treatments but he told me on the last day of my brachytherapy that he wa sorry he ever suggested I stop because for me it was something that really helped me feel well. This go round he has given up telling me to slow down and I am threatening to make him go with me sometime.

I love all the ideas...I hope it helps other ladies on their journey...

xoxo

Anice

CheeseQueen57's picture
CheeseQueen57
Posts: 820
Joined: Feb 2016

I was so jazzed up on my premed steroids every week I baked another type of muffins for the infusion staff. They really appreciated it and they are such angels and it helped them remember who I was. 

ConnieSW's picture
ConnieSW
Posts: 1456
Joined: Jun 2012

I'm a retired nurse so I can positively say baking for staff makes you memorable. 

Another thing I did was knit hats and shawls to donate to my oncologist's office. I need to start doing that again as soon as my family Christmas knitting is done. 

Kaleena's picture
Kaleena
Posts: 1978
Joined: Nov 2009

Originally, I took piano lessons, then I took up taking photographs of the sunsets, animals, etc.   My husband got me a puppy several years ago.   At first it was very tiring for me because I had to take it out in the middle of the night.  But Beckett was the best thing for me.   He knows when I am not feeling well and will just cuddle up to me.   Or he will make me get up and play with him.   He's a sweetie.

Also, I started taking trips that require an airplane (after being married for over 17 years we never took a trip that required airflight).   

ckdgedmom's picture
ckdgedmom
Posts: 166
Joined: Oct 2017

My last cisplatin infusion is supposed to be tomorrow (if my platelets are up)....I'm dreading my last dose of the stupid steroid. I call it Devil Decadron.

Cheese I can feel you with the being hyped up...I wish I liked to bake but I'm more of a cook than a baker but I do think I will pick up some cookies from the cookie place down the street and take them as a thank you to the infusion staff.

And Kaleena I agree that there is nothing quite like a fur baby to make things better...and so does travel...

I finish my treatments this week on Friday (if all goes to plan) and will have my last of 30 radiation (2nd round) then and I am going to go with my bestie to her lake house and just do nothing more taxing than working a puzzle...

happy Sunday night all

xoxo

survivingsu's picture
survivingsu
Posts: 134
Joined: Apr 2013

During my cancer and my treatments I was much too sick and weak for my hobbies - but I held them in the back of my mind, looking forward to the day that I would be able to draw, garden, and do various arts & crafts again.  I enjoyed hobbies vicariously by watching and visiting with my Mom who shared a love of hobbies.  It was kind of ironic to have time off from work but to not be able to enjoy it.  As I got back into the swing of things after treatment, back to work and building up, I introduced my hobbies little by little.  I enjoy them more now than ever before, knowing how precious time really is.

Cass83's picture
Cass83
Posts: 151
Joined: Feb 2017

I use to be a runner, but after surgery I was told to walk as much as possible, so I started walking with my husband, and even the days of my chemo, we would walk in the halls of the hospital after my blood work and before chemo. Walking all through the treatments helped me. I think we might have missed a handful of times all year. Fitness is my life (I am an instructor at my local Y) so keeping active helped me through everything. (As well as prayer, bible reading, watching good teaching and singing on TV) :)

Amatullah
Posts: 36
Joined: Jun 2017

I love beading and making all kinds of jewelry.  I shake a lot more since I started chemo, but already had problems with it because of my Lupus meds, so I just prop up and push through.  It's kind of pathetic to watch and I'm dangerous with a glue gun, but it works.  My little granddaughters love to bead too and they would sometimes steady my hands, so "grammy could work better".  Such sweet little angels.  I bring a suncatcher or two, to my chemo visits and give them away if I meet people who need a spirit lift.  Shiny glass beads make people happy and giving is a good boost for me.  Suncatchers create such beautiful colors and 'wall rainbows', it makes everyone feel better.  It's my therapy.

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