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Rocquie's picture
Rocquie
Posts: 836
Joined: Mar 2013

I have had trouble sleeping for a couple of weeks, which is not like me; I am usually a great sleeper. There haven't been any particular worries plaguing me at night and no symptoms of illness. I just wasn't sleeping. I am not one to lie in bed awake for an extended time as I think that causes stress. I will give myself one hour (at the most). After that, I'm up. I will usually read for a while and try again. None of my tricks were working.

As days went by, I became more and more tired yet sleep evaded me. I even became achy. My lower back hurt as well as my neck and shoulders. I never got more than 3 or 4 hours of sleep per day. Finally last night, as I was walking into the kitchen to make supper, I was overwhelmed with the need to sleep. I told my husband I was going to lie down for a few minutes. I fell sound asleep and kept sleeping. He checked on me a few times because this was so out of the ordinary for me. I wound up sleeping an entire 12 hours! I did get up to tinkle a couple of times and fell right back to sleep. 

This morning I woke up starving. As I sipped my morning cup of tea and read the paper, I read the obituary of a man known for his famous barbecue sauce. Suddenly, barbecue sounded like the most delicious thing in world. If our local BBQ joint had been opened, I would have had it for breakfast. But I had to wait until 11:00. I ordered and picked up a ton of food. When I came home I ate samples of pulled pork, sliced brisket, two different sauces, fried okra, potato salad, collard greens, mac and cheese, hushpuppies, and brunswick stew. It was all delicious and I was stuffed and happy, well rested, and feeling no pain. 

How about you? Have you done anything quirky, out of character, or fun lately?

Cheers, 

Rocquie

 

Max Former Hodgkins Stage 3's picture
Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 3308
Joined: May 2012

R,

The pulled pork, the sleep -- daily stuff for me.

I applaud your Southern fare !

I have needed 10 hours of sleep per day since Lymphoma 8 years ago; without it I cannot stand up.

When in doubt, take a 2 hour nap...

max

 

ShadyGuy
Posts: 407
Joined: Jan 2017

I cannot, under any circumstances, sleep more than 6 hours! I always wake up almost exactly 6 hours after I go to bed regardless of what time time I retire. I think my problem is the opposite of yours - not enough stress. After leading a very active life and working a very stressful job for many years, I need stress to function. So my crazy thing was getting up in the middle of the night and watching youtube videos on my MAC. Well I watched a video about caribou hunting and got carried away. Before even having breakfast I went online and booked a "drop hunt" in the permafrost region (extreme northern Alaska). No guide, no phones, sleeping in tent. Non-refundable of course. Heres the bad part - i waited a month to tell my wife. Ouch! She says I am crazy and in no shape to do this! She is convinced I will die up there! I intend to prove her wrong! What is life if we don't live it? My brother says I am destined to become "bear poop". They both underestimate me. Crazy enough?

i concur with Max on your southern menu. We made okra pickles yesterday. I love to drive over to Asheville for red eye gravy and biscuits. I would do bad things for shrimp and grits.  I make dry ribs frequently. Southern food rocks! Did you know that southern gravy was inspired by Swedish white sauce from the Swedish Colony in Orangeburg South Carolina? So I am told but can't verify that.

Max Former Hodgkins Stage 3's picture
Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 3308
Joined: May 2012

I grew up in Charleston, and I believe shrimp and grits had its origins there, but am uncertain, but it is highly popular all over in the coastal region.  She-Crab Soup is Charlelston in origin, but very popular now from Savannah to Virginia.  Asheville and western NC is historically very different from SC, and heavily Scottish in original settlement.  Most of SC was English in settlement, but Charleston was very diverse from the 1600s, with lots of German and Scandanavian Lutherans, and even a very large Jewish element, which is still there.  Charleston also had some Scots, as the Citadel Bagpipe Corps, still in existence, reflects. They march in kilts.   

Although Episcopal, coastal SC was originally referred to by Parish, not County, similiar to Catholic Louisiana, but of course legally the boundries are "Counties."  But in any given area the places are still commonly called by the Parish, such as "St Andrews" in Chrleston, or "St George" in Georgetown. And significant Frenchmen also; many downtown streets have French names still.  Charleston in colonial times had one of the largest Jewish presences in North America.  The oldest continuous-use Reform Synagogue in North America is on Hasell Street. Several of the best downtown delis are kashrut ("Kosher").

Orangeburg County had a heavy scattering of Scandanavian settlers. One little town is named 'Norway,' and I believe 'Denmark, SC' is there also, so the white gravy link is quite plausible.

Hurricane Irma is currently projected to most likely re-enter the US mainland at around Savannah to Hilton Head (assunibng it goes through Florida earlier), and then blast Orangeburg County, which is about 40 miles inland from the coast.  The Edisto River flows through there, a blackwater river, that floods easily.

max

http://www.citadel.edu/root/band-pipes

muledaze's picture
muledaze
Posts: 18
Joined: Aug 2017

Hi Max, my family left Scotland in the 1700's and have lived in Charleston (and Mt. Pleasant) since then. At one point Boone Hall - Mt. Pleasant was owned by my forefathers.  My relatives, John & David Deas were also credited with bringing the first golf ball & clubs to America https://harlestongreen.wordpress.com/tag/david-deas/.  They are referred to as "merchants" but in fact they were slave traders as they were ship builders from Edinburgh.  Icky history, can't sanitize what happened........

My gramps taught at the Citadel and my dad went there.  The gym at the Citadel is named the Deas Gym after my uncle Happy Deas.  Most of my family is buried at St. Philips Episcopal Church were we have a pew with our name engraved on it!  Most of my family were military officers, gramps attended West Point and was Col. US Army, dad was fighter pilot USAF ret Lt. Col. and all of my uncles were pilots and submarine officers.  We flew dad's ashes back to Charleston, he had his service at Summerall Chapel and had a Citadel bagpiper play.  The burial was full military honors and the tourist were hanging over the cemetary walls of St. Phillips to watch the 21 gun salute.  RIP Lt. Col. John (Jack) Deas.  My mom was native Californian (but her family also came from Scotland) and I've lived in California most of my life.  So wonderful to read your description of Charleston & area, thanks!!

I remember Hurricane Hugo's devastation years ago and praying for all the folks in Irma's path.  

Having my CT scan in a month and will know more about how my growths are doing and go from there.  All the best and will keep you updated since this site has given me so much valuable information.

Sincerely,

Lisa Deas

Max Former Hodgkins Stage 3's picture
Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 3308
Joined: May 2012

Fascinating, Deas.  But I've never seen a mule in Charlerston.

My mom was a Cooper. Her ancestors were significant in the founding of Georgetown. A sister of her's owned Beneventum Plantation on the Black River for nearly 50 years (until around 1992, when she died and things were sold off).  Beneventum was owned in its early years by Chriostopher Gadsden. It was never a primary residence for him.  Beneventum was owned during the Civil War by the second treasurer of the CSA, whose name I forgot.  As kids we spent much of our summers there, wandering the 190 acres or so. It is on the National Resister, and its house is one of the very few original plantation houses in the region, begun in 1748.  The original rice field dikes for flooding are still there in the marsh areas. Our family is now unaffiliated with the property

I got my B.A. at the College of Charleston, but later started an MA in History, and took much of the coursework at the Citadel Evening Program, which is unrelated to the Corps of Cadets of course.  There was a guy in one class whose distant ancestors had founded The Elms Plantation in Goose Creek.  The Elms is what Charleston Southern University was built on. As kids we used to go on dirt bikes and explore the ruins, which are on the edge today of what is the great Goose Creek Swamp.  The ruins are still there.  I am told the Poinsettia flower was introduced to North America via Mr Poinsett, who was prominent in the area, bu not an owner of the Elms, if I recall correctly.  Poinsett was a prominent UNIONIST, scientist, and world-traveller.

I still have famiy in Charleston, but development has ruined most of the area, in my opinion.  Going to the beach for most is a traffic nightmare, not worth the effort.  Everything is paved over and has become a continuous string of Wal Marts, separated by CVS and McDonalds.  There are some preserved areas, but the spirit of the area has been destroyed.  Endless streams of Northeasterners pretending to be Scarlette O'Hara for a week. Ultimately, schizophrenic.  Virtually all of the great properties were bought by rich northeasterners after the war.  Understand: I lived in Connecticut for a few years, have lots of cousins on my dad's side in Billrecia, MA (outside Boston). I love the Northeast and everything about it.  But you are more likely to hear a Brooklyn or New Jersey accent in Charleston than a southern one.

This thread is about crazy getaways and fun things...go to Charleston for a weekend, but go in the winter, when the crowds are gone.

Charleston was one of the main points of landing for a very high percentage of all of the slaves forced to North America. Most were quaranteened at Sullivan's Island, which was nowhere a planter wanted to be back then.  Today, Sullivan's is almost gated now, a resort for the Uber-rich from all over the world.  I had cousins from the end of Sullivan's Island, and back then, it was just a bohemian hamlet for people who wanted to breath the salt air.

Like you, I just felt compelled to mention the bad with the good. My immediate family was never wealthy, but we had relatives who were.  Sort of like rewriting the Judy Collins hit Both Sides Now :

I've looked at wealth from both sides now/ From Near and Far, but still somehow/ It's wealth's illusions I recall/ I really don't know wealth at all/

And I feel better for it,

max

muledaze's picture
muledaze
Posts: 18
Joined: Aug 2017

Hi Max, there are mules in downtown Charleston pulling the carriages!  Your family history is super interesting as well for sure, thanks so much for sharing - love this thread!  My gramps Alston Deas, wrote a book called The Early Ironwork of Charleston, still selling on Amazon.  He was instrumental in the historic preservation of downtown Charleston.  Much of our family artwork is in the Charleston Museum.  Our family also had homes on Sullivans Island and my dad owned a little marina on the inland waterway which is now the Isle of Palms Marina.  He also developed Dewees Island.  Yes, Charleston is a huge tourist destination but so is my hometown of Carmel, CA.  After Clint Eastwood became our Mayor and the Monterey Bay Aquarium was built - the sweet little mom & pop shops all turned into Rodeo Drive with traffic to match 24/7.

I loved my dads stories of growing up in Charleston.  Still have alot of family living on and around the battery.   Hope to return for a visit before too long.  AND I LOVE grits!!!  And I totally agree with you, I've been broke and I've been rich, all I want is my health and family/friends to enjoy.

Have a lovely weekend and many thanks for sharing your very interesting background.  All the best for the weekend!  Lisa

ShadyGuy
Posts: 407
Joined: Jan 2017

i am convinced that southern food would be more popular outside the south if names were changed. Examples

grits = polenta=exact same thing. Italy imports grits from the USA and calls it polenta.  (grits not popular polenta wildly popular).  (Crevettes et polenta avec sauce au cafe noir- yummy and so sophisticated - the same thing as shrimp and grits. Shrimp, grits and black coffee gravy (aka redeye gravy - has several variations)- yuuuk.

Orange roughy yumm! - slimehead yuck - same thing

Cilantro - chinese parsley or corriander in India - same thing

Kiwi fruit - chinese gooseberry - same thing

squid - slimy and awful   Calamari - agift from heaven - same thing

You get my drift. Presentation really matters. But thats ok - that leaves more for me.

Now back to the topic at hand. The disease we all share. This watch and wait is hard. Had a terrible night sweat a few days ago. Soaked from head to toe. Classic B symptom. Do you suppose if that happens in Alaska that sweat would freeze? Hummm. Lets hope I don't find out! Only thing coming back in a box will be that caribou Or at least his edible parts. Jerky for everyone!

Max Former Hodgkins Stage 3's picture
Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 3308
Joined: May 2012

Yes,it is all in the packaging. I never could figure out why 'grits' were reviled.  It is ground corn -- very natural, low tech, and healthy.  I eat bagels, why can't New Yorkers like grits ?

What renaming can never cure is "chitlins." Chitlins are fried hog intestines. Never eaten them, never will.  In fairness, I do not know of chitlins having ever been a traditional Southern dish.

The night sweats are concerning. Keep yourself checked out.

max

Max Former Hodgkins Stage 3's picture
Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 3308
Joined: May 2012

Shady,

I doubt night sweats in Alaska could freeze, but I know the question was meant in jest. We surfaced above Alaska once, way above the Arctic Circle. One lieutenant (an 0-3 in the Navy, same as an Army Captian) set up a photo op:  He stripped to swim trunks and tennis shoes, and grabbed a blanket.  Went topside and across the portable brow we had brought along, spread out the blanket, and laid down on his side and had his pic taken. Then jumped up and ran back aboard. The blanket and shoes were to prevent freezing to the ice.   Air temp then was 35 F below zero (-35F), unsure of the wind chill.  67 degrees F below freezing !  And this was in the middle of the Arctic "summer."

Not recommended....  As the cook in the movie Apocalypse Now kept screaming after nearly being eaten by a tiger while searching for mangoes in the jungle, "Say on the boat ! Stay on the boat !"

A warm lodge with a massive fireplace sounds about right,

max

Rocquie's picture
Rocquie
Posts: 836
Joined: Mar 2013

That would explain the preponderous number of Presbyterian churches in the area.

 

Evarista
Posts: 265
Joined: May 2017

Ha!  Can't get enough of 'em since my appetite returned.  My kids just gave me a sign to hang in my kitchen:  Kiss my Grits

Rocquie's picture
Rocquie
Posts: 836
Joined: Mar 2013

Yes, that is crazy enough! Where in Asheville do you go for red eye gravy? I agree, Southern food rocks!

Rocquie

 

illead's picture
illead
Posts: 844
Joined: Aug 2012

Hi Roquie,

That was eloquent and heartwarming.  We need a smile in this weather wracked time.  We pray for all who are affected by these monstrous storms and hope you are all safe.  When we were in Houston, the hotel had instant microwave oatmeal and grits.  Man, I am now a fan of grits for breakfast, although I was raised by an Italian stepmother and we had polenta, never for breakfast! 

Becky

Rocquie's picture
Rocquie
Posts: 836
Joined: Mar 2013

Becky, I'm glad you are seeing the light on grits! 

Smile Rocquie

 

Max Former Hodgkins Stage 3's picture
Max Former Hodg...
Posts: 3308
Joined: May 2012

An Honorary Southern Eater Award to Miss Becky...comes with a gift card to Waffle House or Cracker Barrel.  

(Note: When speakin' Southern, all women are 'Miss' or 'Missie', regardless of marital status.  Men are all addressed by waitresses as 'Hun' or 'Darlin', even when their wives are seated with them.  If a guy is first addressed as 'Darlin,' he can then reply with someting like, "Missie, is that thar sweet pertater pie as sweet as you ?"

Waffle House, founded in Georgia, confers the southern greasy spoon breakfast ambiance. Largest seller of hash browns on earth.  FEMA actually uses whether or not Waffle Houses stay open after storms in predicing hurricane damage; I have read this several times on the mainstream news in the past. 

Cracker Barrel is also southern (Tennessee founded and managed), but "fancy dinin'. "  Better for when you need a waitress, or have a hankerin (desire) for greens, or corn bread, or to shop for the latest Hee Haw DVDs in the gift shop.

max

ShadyGuy
Posts: 407
Joined: Jan 2017

Just looked at a tube (shaped like a sausage) of Sun Of Italy polenta. I like to slice it and fry it in a little margarine. The label reads "ingredients: grits, water"! What a hoot. My mom used to cook grits once in a while and let it congeal in the fridge. She would then slice it and brown it in a skillet. I loved polenta and didn't even know it! My sisters ex was an Italian guy from Sicily. He liked it every meal in place of bread.

Off to the tundra. Back in 2 weeks. Have an onc appointment on the 28th.

My best to everyone, especially Rocqui. Such a gentle soul. We can all learn from her.

 

 

Rocquie's picture
Rocquie
Posts: 836
Joined: Mar 2013

Shady, you are too sweet. Take care of yourself out there!

Rocquie

 

lindary's picture
lindary
Posts: 657
Joined: Mar 2015

Rocquie - I had to laugh at your description of what happened. Your husband had to wonder when you finally did sleep but worried when it was so long.

I don't have trouble sleeping but I celebrate any time I can sleep 6 hours straight. Usually I wake up every 3 or 4 hours to go to the bathroom. Other than an occasional celebration about sleep time my life has been very routine. 

The talk about SC is fascinating! I have a brother-in-law who lives in the Bluffton area with his daughter and her husband. Last I heard they have decided to stay home based on the latest news on IRMA's path. I also several friends that live in various places in Florida. 

Thinking about Rocquie's story I need to do something fun this weekend. Considering temps here are in the 60's not sure it will be outside. 

Rocquie's picture
Rocquie
Posts: 836
Joined: Mar 2013

Linda, the most fun thing I do is spend every weekend with my 8 year old granddaughter. She is such a delight! We take her to ballet lessons on Saturday then out to eat lunch. I love to cook and she loves to help me. I pick her up from school on Friday and take her back to school on Monday morning. Her mother is a nurse and works 3 (12 hour) shifts on weekends. Her father just deployed to Kuwait. Grandchildren are so much more fun than children!

Cheers,

Rocquie

 

 

 

po18guy
Posts: 1007
Joined: Nov 2011

Crashing my motorcycle may not qualifiy, but it does point out the great benefits of osteoporosis! Howzat you say? Well, I broke my right shoulder (scapula) and five right ribs into 12 pieces. Pretty difficult to see a plus in that - until you realize that my scapula breaking saved my shoulder joint. The weakened bone gave way, preserving the cartilage and tendons, etc. No surgery, no rotater cuff tear, no nothing. And the bone healed by itself. As to the broken ribs being a plus, not so much. I can still feel them move a bit when I twist or cough.

Was flown to Hawaii last weekend for a lymphoma seminar, but had to avoid the sun! Cry Rats!

Evarista
Posts: 265
Joined: May 2017

Hi Shady.  I just happened to read one of your posts from last January.  So happy to see that you are in this wonderful place now.  Enjoy the wilderness.  My onc appointment is the 26th (with PET).  Good luck to both of us!

Rocquie's picture
Rocquie
Posts: 836
Joined: Mar 2013

If anyone is interested, I just posted a recipe and photo (from my food blog) at the Expressions Gallery.

OO7's picture
OO7
Posts: 282
Joined: Sep 2014

I'm quite guilty of this, especially now on this journey.  I can honestly say now more than ever before and thrilled to read you did this.  Bravo!  For me it's not so much my past experiences in my life but it did give me the added nudge to do such things rather than consider doing them.  I think it like living life to the absolute fullest, especially now while I feel great (minus a broken rib).  It's the better side of having you know what....

Why not I say.  I go sledding in a blizzard in my backyard, all day long.  I'm 51 and make snow angles, using and wearing fancy everything.  Inviting people over when I don't feel well and the house is a mess.  I so never did that before!  A few weeks ago I was gardening, harvesting my lavender when the sky opened up.  I ran for my house then stopped.  Put my precious lavender away then sat on my hammock in the rain.  I have so many stories like this, no doubt my family thinks I lost it but some how I think I rediscovered the simple things in life I cherish so much.

If an eleven am barbecue is your fancy, do it!

Enjoy and hope sleeping again!

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