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JanJan63's picture
JanJan63
Posts: 2482
Joined: Sep 2014

I think I've posted about this before but with my carppy memory I'm not sure. Please indulge me if I have. 

I spent almost 4 hours with my horse yesterday. I was and am exhausted, which is not a surprise. What is a surprise is that I'm sore. My muscles hurt. I can barely lift my left arm. This is lack of conditioning, not just leftover from either the cancer or the bloodclot/stroke/paralysis or even weakness and fatigue from being on chemo. I feel like a lazy bum! I do spend some time most days lying on the couch because I'm so tired but I'm not going to feel any better if I've allowed myself to become physically inactive and unfit. The hard part is knowing what I can and can't do. In the past I've had problems with doing too much and then being almost totally out of commission for up to two days due to exhaustion so I've tried to avoid pushing myself. 

But today I'm thinking that I can and should do more to get myesle fin shape. I'm fully aware that it helps with cancer but I thought I wasn't doing that badly. Obviously I've been deluding myself. I've gone from soemone who is always active and can't sit still to enjoying lying on the couch. That's so not me!

I've thought about this before and thought maybe yoga would be a good way to start. I'm not interested in doing anything too strenuous or hard on the joints and my balance has never been good since the blood clot. Also, I can't run. I go a few steps and then my foot doesn't come off the ground properly and I trip and fall. It's quite scary and if I hit my head I could seriously injure myself due to being on blood thinners. And I'm not going to run around with a helmet on. Also, the chemo makes me sun sensitive so anything outdoors is a no. I'm burned right now from the outdoor wedding we went to on Saturday. And being at the barn yesterday. Luckily. we ride in an indoor arena so that's not an issue.

I don't want to join a gym. It's expensive and I'd want someone with some experience in my situation to train me, not some kid who took a course. What's your opinions? Start with the yoga? It certainly is strength training and helps with balance and stretches the muscles. 

Oh yeah, the other good news is that I finally found a stretch that has eliminated my long term sciatica! So that's no longer an issue, yay!

Thanks for any advice! If you have any low stress, beginner style exercises I'd love to hear them. I tried a guy on line recently who said he works with people who've had medical issues but he was no help at all.

Jan 

darcher's picture
darcher
Posts: 257
Joined: Jun 2017

  The main thing is not to overdo it.  A little exercise is good and gradually build up to a level you're comfortable with.  You don't want to get to the point of breaking a sweat because that may make you not want to do it the next day.  Just about anything is good. Joining a gym?  A giant waste of money as far as I'm concerned.  Five years back I was a hog. At 5'10" and 240 I wasn't easy on the eyes.  All I did was cut out the junk food and walked about a mile down the road and back each day.  In a few months I lost over 70lbs and that was with eating a fat steak every other day for dinner. I've maintained it since then without much effort.  Anything like that can get your blood going and leave you feeling energized.  There is no need to buy the exercise drinks, shakes, bars, and all that.  It's expensive and taste like horse crap anyhow. The goal is to be able to look in the mirror and like what you see.     

lizard44's picture
lizard44
Posts: 409
Joined: Apr 2015

Maybe the four hours was overdoing it a bit and that's why you're so sore.  Maybe you should ease into  fitness at a slightly slower pace. You know, push yourself a little, but not too much, or as our yoga instructor tells us, "Listen to your body.".   I think the yoga is a great idea. The yoga class I attend is made up in large part of  people who have had cancer or some sort of surgery or health problems. Most of us are  older, but quite a few young people have  started coming, too. I like yoga because it not only helps tone muscles and strengthen your core, but it  also helps with breathing, relaxation and meditation. If you  can't find any suitable yoga  classes in your area there are lots of videos available  that you can use at home.  Besides the yoga, and because our summers are so hot and humid which makes walking  a little more difficult than I can handle. I bought a manual treadmill so I can walk a little bit everyday without worrying about dying of heatstroke of getting too much sun. I don't have to worry about  tripping and falling because I can hold onto the handles.  :-)

Cindy225's picture
Cindy225
Posts: 172
Joined: Feb 2017

Reco the best exercise is walking; with inspirational music (like the playlist everyone created :-) ) or in a beautiful location or with friends and family. My husband and I try to walk 5-7 miles several times a week. Dancing is another great form of exercise! Especially on a Friday night after a Margarita! Another approach is to get a fitness tracker that lets you know your steps and activity levels.  Helpful to get a nudge every now and then if you're inactive for too long. I love to run too but it's not for everyone.  That said, shuffling right now as recovering from the ileostomy reversal which has been quite the experience!  Getting lots of exercise running to the bathroom... 

NHMike
Posts: 214
Joined: Jul 2017

I bought a new running watch this past January and it's been great for running but it also has the activity tracking features so it reminds me to move throughout the day. That's a bigger issue now that I'm working at home. I had long walks to the bathroom and kitchen in the office but everything is nearby at home. Best is to go outside for a walk or a run. Yesterday I went to run and my GI was gurgling. Huge amount of gas yesterday afternoon and evening. It can be hard to plan workouts when the chemo and radiation are messing around with your insides.

SandiaBuddy's picture
SandiaBuddy
Posts: 878
Joined: Apr 2017

Jan:  There is a lot of knowledge to be found in books.  If you are interested, why not drop by the library and check out a few instuction books?  And of course, there is always Youtube.  Even with sun-sensitivity, walking is probably one of the simplist and best things you can do.  As for gyms, once again you can design your own routine by reading or using the internet.  Who cares what anyone else thinks?  I am a fan of the gym, but I have gone for decades so I have learned to tune out everyone else who is there.  The best thing of all is that increasing your activity level is demonstrated to help you fight cancer.  Good luck with your activity plan!

NHMike
Posts: 214
Joined: Jul 2017

4 hours doing any physical activity is a lot. Especially if you're not used to doing it.

I'm normally very active and like to run, lift, play tennis, and practice yoga moves. But my activity level is down considerably from diagnosis due to the emotional strain. I was just outside running for half a mile and want to do some more stuff in the basement this evening.

There are a ton of videos on YouTube on Yoga, Pilates and all sorts of bodyweight exercises. There are videos for beginners, intermediate and advanced folks. The important thing is to start out slowly doing safe exercises. Last week, while waiting for my radiation treatment, I did about 15 exercises. One of them was leg lunges which I hadn't done for several months. The outside of my rear end was sore for four days and it was a big pain because I couldn't tell when I had a problem with the tumor or if it was the exercise. If you do a little, your body comes up to speed quickly, and then you can do some more.

I try to focus on my core, the area roughly from your knees to below your chest. Some exercises that I like: plank, side plank, russian twist, mountain climbers, lunges, brazilian crunch, bicycle situps, leg raises (from flat on your back), single-leg squats, steps (need a step or sturdy box), pushups. These generally don't require any special equipment and many are done on the floor. I try to stretch every day - especially if I'm running. I have a standard routine for calves, hamstrings, mouth (look up and stretch like you're screaming), rotator cuff, back, sides, fingers. An extended stretch would include the neck and the arms though the latter is by hanging off a pullup machine.

I find that barbell exercises (can be done with dumbbells, bands, body bars, TRX, etc.) are the most efficient in hitting a lot of muscles with a particular exercise. I think that deadlifts work the most muscles in one exercise and, of course, you can do it without any weight at all besides your own bodyweight.

I do like to go to the gym as they have a lot of equipment but I've been avoiding the gym outside of times when there's nobody else there as I'm supposed to avoid getting sick while on chemo and radiation and gyms are notorious places for spreading stuff that can make you sick. I always wash my hands a lot after using the gym equipment.

So you might start with going to youtube.com and typing in workout in the search window. If you want a particular type of workout, then add that too. Maybe beginner yoga workout.

 

 

 

JanJan63's picture
JanJan63
Posts: 2482
Joined: Sep 2014

Thank you so much everyone for your helpful ideas and encouragement! I knew this was the place to ask. I'm pretty sure for the second time, sorry. 

Jan

NHMike
Posts: 214
Joined: Jul 2017

I may have overdone it yesterday. 30 minutes of tennis, some barbell exercises and a bunch of bodyweight stuff. Sore this morning but slept really well last night.

JanJan63's picture
JanJan63
Posts: 2482
Joined: Sep 2014

Tennis? Good for you! I wish I could be outside for more than a few minutes. I was told I have a sunburn on my scalp when my onc was checkiing my rash yesterday. Hats aren't enough to keep me from feeling horrible after being in the sun for any length of time. It's so hot here right now. Muggy and hot, bleh.

Jan

NHMike
Posts: 214
Joined: Jul 2017

My partner would have preferred hitting outside but I'm trying to avoid a lot of sun and trying to limit the chances of injuries and I've found that there are fewer risks playing indoors compared to playing outside. Stuff like insects, pollen, debris on the court that you can trip on (indoor courts are cleaned daily) and the generally better condition of indoor courts (most of the outdoor courts that we play on are public courts that haven't seen maintenance in ten to 25 years). Lots of public courts outdoors have cracks and/or weeds growing through the cracks. I'm avoiding running outside when it's sunny as well. Only when it's cloudy. My other option is an indoor treadmill. I will see if I can post a video of me hitting one of these days.

I'm having this discussion on another forum as well and I did a little research on exercise. I'm sure that there's a lot more out there but this is what I found with a quick search.

Research has found no harmful effects on patients with cancer from moderate exercise and, in fact, has demonstrated that those who exercised regularly had 40% to 50% less fatigue, the primary complaint during treatment. (See Fighting Cancer Fatigue.)
...
Your goal should be at least 30 minutes of aerobic exercise five days a week or more. ...

https://www.nccn.org/patients/resources/life_with_cancer/exercise.aspx

Researchers at the University of Rochester Wilmot Cancer Institute discovered something simple and inexpensive to reduce neuropathy in hands and feet due to chemotherapy--exercise.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/06/160604051004.htm


In the past, people being treated for a chronic illness (an illness a person may live with for a long time, like cancer or diabetes) were often told by their doctor to rest and reduce their physical activity. This is good advice if movement causes pain, rapid heart rate, or shortness of breath. But newer research has shown that exercise is not only safe and possible during cancer treatment, but it can improve how well you function physically and your quality of life.

https://www.cancer.org/treatment/survivorship-during-and-after-treatment/staying-active/physical-activity-and-the-cancer-patient.html

ron50's picture
ron50
Posts: 1721
Joined: Nov 2001

In my opinion. A few years arter cancer I decided it was time to hit the road and get fit. I worked up to walking around fifty miles a week every week for nearly three years. That is when I hit the wall. I had lost around forty kilos. All the walking had freed up a bunch of small black gallstones in my gallbladder. One of them blocked off my pancreatic duct and I finished up in er with acute pancreatitis.   I lost my gallbladder.  My surgeon was apalled at the amout of excercise I was doing and asked if I was trying to kill myself. What did he know?  Every other doctor told me I was too fat and needed to lose weight. I continued my walking. Pretty soon I was back at the same doctor for an endoscopy. His initial dx was stomach cancer. It wasn't but for a while it looked like I may lose my stomach due to extensive ulceration. It now appears the problem may have been due to blie salt malapsorbtion. I tried getting back into walking but I was staring to have serious problems with lack of feeling in my feet. I was sent to a neurologist and he did nerve conductivity tests. The results were moderate to severe motor sensory peripheral neuropathy in both feet and legs.. I had no platinum drugs for chemo , justs 5fu and levamisole. The fu was every tuesday for 48 weeks. This is my twentieth year of survival. The neuropathy is up past my hipsand in my left hand and arm. I have been diagnosed with an auto-immune disease of unknown type and cause. It causes the neuropathy, it causes nephrotic syndrome of the kidneys, it has caused auto immune hepatitis. My nephrologist believes it is causing congestive heart failure like symptoms (peripheral and pulmonary Oedeema) he does not feel that it is heart failue . He said that it resolves too quickly for heart failure. A short burst of fluid restrictions anddouble diuretics and it resolves. he said if it were HF i would have to restrict fluid and use a higher dose of diuretic constantly. I take cyclosporine twice a day and that has stabilised my protein loss from the nephrotic syndrome. I also experience 13,00 premature ectopic heartbeats a day that cannot be explained.  Where I could once walk miles I can now only walk a couple of hundred yards at a time. Ther is a good chance that the neuropathy is now interfereing with the motility in my remaining colon . I am now 67 and my nephrologist is now suggesting drugs that will improve my quality of life rather that quantity. You don't often hear neprologists suggesting non steroidal anti inflammatories for patients with renal failure.. Ron.

NHMike
Posts: 214
Joined: Jul 2017

I'm sorry that you've had so many other problems after recovering from cancer but am glad that you've lived so long after it.

I've always been an active person though the levels of activity have varied over the years. I ran 40 miles the week before I went to the ER and running is a part of me. So is tennis, stretching and weightlifting. I would agree that moderation is a good thing but I'm still working on figuring out what that means. 30 minutes of tennis instead of my usual 60 to 90 minutes is some moderation (used to play for three hours when I was in my 40s). Running a mile or two a day would be moderation from running 5 miles a day (I did that for a year a few years ago). So I need to moderate - the trick is in figuring out the exact level of that moderation.

Annabelle41415's picture
Annabelle41415
Posts: 6181
Joined: Feb 2009

I'm a huge believer in Fitbit.  I've had mine for years and even wore it the day of my hip replacement surgery LOL.  It's a great way to keep you moving when you have been inactive.  Staying active can help you in many ways.  If you are able to walk and get around, try to do it at least every hour.  It's hard to get motivated especially when you feel like "crap".  Just try to do about 300 steps every hour if you can.  Get out in that fresh air as well - that takes the mind off a lot of things. 

Hugs! Kim

NHMike
Posts: 214
Joined: Jul 2017

I felt crummy this morning and went out for a short walk, came back in, had some food, felt crummy, went out for a short run and felt better again. Walking or running, even for short distances can improve how you feel when on the chemo and even normally. I don't know what it is about activity that can make you feel better but it works for me. I have a Garmin GPS Running Watch but it comes with the fitness tracking stuff (it doesn't count stairs though) and the reminders to move every hour.

Edit: there are a lot of web pages indicating that you should walk about 10,000 steps a day for good health. 10,000 steps per day would be about five miles per day which is likely far more than typical. It would be easy to do for a runner as you could do three miles for 6K and do the rest with normal walking. My steps for the day are 5,288 so nowhere near 10K and I'm not going to get there. I need to up my game for sure - only got in a short run. I do know that walking helps GI issues, especially in coercing gas out of the GI tract, and it makes my overall body feel better. I likely wouldn't walk as much as I do without the hourly reminders.

Annabelle41415's picture
Annabelle41415
Posts: 6181
Joined: Feb 2009

Glad that you got out there and ran for a short distance.  I'm not able to run, but love to walk.  My Fitbit has a goal on it where I'm supposed to walk at least 250 steps an hour for 9 hours, not including the normal steps I'm able to take.  So I'm always aware that at every hour I'm supposed to get up and walk around the house 3 times in order to make those additional 250 steps.  Sometimes I'm inclined to even walk another whole trip around the house.  It adds the steps on big time if you think it's only "250" steps.  I'm now over 10,000 a day which it's been a goal for some time.  Tracking steps is a good way to stay fit.  Try to do a little every day and not so much at one time - you will get there.  Treatment stinks and it's hard to get motivated.  Glad you are reminded to walk.  Hope you feel better.

Kim

NHMike
Posts: 214
Joined: Jul 2017

Maintaining 10K steps per day is awesome. I should make it a goal through chemo. Not sure I can do it with all of the stuff I'm dealing with but certainly a goal. I imagine that you feel a lot better with that kind of activity than without it.

NHMike
Posts: 214
Joined: Jul 2017

I got in 12,500 today. We'll see if I can do 10K for a week. Thanks for the inspiration.

Annabelle41415's picture
Annabelle41415
Posts: 6181
Joined: Feb 2009

Awesome job Mike - that is wonderful news and I'm sure you felt better for it.  Don't push it if you're not used to doing it on a daily basis though.  Just make sure that you can do 250 steps an hour above your normal walking.  You are an inspiration for all that you are going through and stll trying to stay fit.  Hope that you can continue to get as much exercise as you can.

Kim

beaumontdave's picture
beaumontdave
Posts: 992
Joined: Aug 2013

I was feeling a bit heavy and out of shape, then work get busy, life got busy. When you have little choice but to respond, even in this heat and humidity[SoCal], you shape up pretty fast, or get wiped out. So now that I've survived the workload I feel pretty good, I just need to incorperate time on the eliptical for cardio, at least it's inside where the a/c is. Jan look around for an eliptical and just peddle it as much as you feel you can on a given day. It's easy on the joints and 20 minutes a day will do wonders. Now if I could only follow my own advice,LOL...............................................Dave

NHMike
Posts: 214
Joined: Jul 2017

I think that anything that you do is better than bagging it, even when it's so easy to bag it. Good to hear that you're getting in your cardio and, yes, the elliptical is a lot easier on your joints.

JanJan63's picture
JanJan63
Posts: 2482
Joined: Sep 2014

Thanks you guys! Sorry for not responding sooner. I've been pretty down for a few days, since my most recent chemo. I think when I went to see my onc the day before and she had another doctor there and he seemed so sad for me that it really put me off. It might be his usual demeanor, I don't know, but it made me feel hopeless again. I'm trying to get past that feeling right now. When I feel crappy it's harder and I've had pretty bad fatigue since the chemo on Friday. I need to push myself to do anything right now and I have some really dark thoughts about death and dying. I hate it when I'm scared like this.

Jan

plsletitrain
Posts: 253
Joined: Jul 2017

Jan, I'm so sad to read about this latest post of yours that I decided to go out from hibernation and just reply to this post because I think you're one of the sweetest persons on here.  I was like that the previous week (when I learned about the lung mass) and its harder to tell yourself to be positive when you're dealing with the chemo side effects at the same time (especially nausea). Please stay strong, I know its easy to say. I was like that last week (the thought of having a lung mass and having no money to go further with chemo).  Now I'm dealing things on my own (I'll just finish this last 3 chemo sessions and I'm off to alternative medicine--so I won't be posting much anymore but I'll continue to lurk for information I may gather).  Please continue to research for possible trials, whether related to science or any alternative therapy.  I understand the feeling of hopelessness and it just takes a toll on my physical activities so I've decided I'll try to heal myself with whatever means I can, diet plus some alternative medicine and trying not to stress myself out, like indulging myself in watching comedy shows and movies.   I hope my plan of action will work for me and will hopefully continue to shrink the lung mass. Now I feel somehow better.  I'll pray for you and take care.  Please don't give in to hopelessness.  As long as we're alive, there's hope.  I've heard of so many stories where people were told they were dying and has still continued to live till today.

JanJan63's picture
JanJan63
Posts: 2482
Joined: Sep 2014

Thank you so much, your support means so much. You know exactly how I'm feeling and that's so helpful. I try to be positive always and don't ever want someone to not be around me because I'm all down about the cancer but it's been really hard for days now. I had another dream last week where an angel told me I was going to be okay but I think it's just me in my head trying to soothe myself. I avoid talking about the future because I don't know if there is one or how long it will last. I hate that I'm so tired these days that I'm pretty useless. It's summer and I'm hardly outside because the heat drains me even more and the sun is intolerable for more than a few minutes. Yesterday we had a hummingbird and I missed it because I was inside. I haven't seen one in twenty years Exactly twenty years because it was one of the last things my mom and I experienced before she went in the hospital to die from cancer and it's kind of like my symbol for her. She'll be gone twenty years next month.

I am just sick and heartbroken to think that you have to make the choice about treatment because you don;t have anymore coverage. I assume you live in the states. That's horrible. And the situation is getting worse, I cannot imagine it. I am so upset for you. At least I don;t have that worry. I live in Canada. We might be a bit behind as far as treatments go because we take longer to approve them but at least treatment is never in doubt. I am so sorry you're dealing with that, that's so upsetting. I have no words. I'm so sorry.

I will continue to pray for you and everyone on here and everyone with cancer. There has got to be some progression in treatments soon, it's been a while.

Hugs,

Jan 

NHMike
Posts: 214
Joined: Jul 2017

I did well for two days. And then constipation clobbered me and it took two days to recover. Then the burning stuff happened and it took me a few days to adjust. And I got a lot busier at work on Wednesday. So yesterday I agreed to hit tennis balls. I lasted for about 25 minutes before I felt that I couldn't continue and stopped. I got invited be some guys on the next court to play on Sundays for the next three weeks and I just told them that I couldn't play for more than 30 minutes at a time (I didn't say why). They said that would be okay but I declined as I often don't know how I'll feel day by day or even hour by hour.

I just did five minutes of stretching and I was surprised at how tight I was as I haven't done any major stretching since the previous week. It was basically a tough week which really cramped my workout desires. I decided not to run because I was afraid of friction issues with the burning. As a runner, I'm well acquainted with friction issues but I have clothes that prevent that. I have tried Glide in the past as well as Vaseline and those work but I hate using consumables when the problem can be solved with clothes. I've had bloody nipples too - basically solved with synthetic shirts as opposed to cotton shirts.

So it's tough trying to workout. And do all of the other stuff. And deal with the changes in our bodies. All I can do is my best and that's not much right now.

But it feels so good when I workout, most of the time.

 

 

beaumontdave's picture
beaumontdave
Posts: 992
Joined: Aug 2013

10,000 steps a day would hobble me something awful. I'm sure I get there a few days a week, but the less I take the better I feel the next day. I have bad feet, a form of muscular dystrophy called CMT, so my goals are different. The eliptical helps a lot with getting cardio, but I just rediscovered how much of a workout I can get sitting on my patio with a beer in my hand. Remember the Charles Atlas ads in comic books and the like? Well his workouts were based on isometrics, flexing against things that don't move or against opposing muscle groups. I've done this type of workout several times now and it's amazing how much burn I get without having to stand on sore feet. It wont improve my athleticism, but it burns calories and creates muscle growth and tone, , while I'm still relaxing, mostly. It probably looks strange, while I'm doing it, but clenching various muscle groups a couple hundred times, leaves me as sore as lifting weights, so I'm going to do this and the eliptical regularly for a while and see how it goes. Try not to get too down about goals, NHMike, the line between pushing and punishing gets a bit blurry when you're going through all this cancer crap. I remember days where the desire to acomplish things merely doubled my funk when I couldn't do that. Who needs to double down on a rough day and/or a bad mood?.....................................................Dave

NHMike
Posts: 214
Joined: Jul 2017

I used to do isometric exercises when I was a lot younger but found a lot of others to do as I got older. I like to set goals and then work to keep them and there's a realization that you can't always do what you set out to do when kids and life comes along and cancer is certainly one of those huge things where I have to lower expectations. I have several chores to do today: laundry, vacuuming, taking out the trash and trying to fix a door and those items may provide a decent workout. I still want to do something in terms of working out, every day. I used to use the elliptical and/or rowing machine when I had knee injuries from running and adapting to injuries is one of those things you get used to if you workout regularly.

 

NHMike
Posts: 214
Joined: Jul 2017

I got 11K steps in today. Average of 6K steps per day this past week. I can do a lot on weekends because no chemo/radiation. I hope that this week is better.

Annabelle41415's picture
Annabelle41415
Posts: 6181
Joined: Feb 2009

That is an exceptional goal step for someone on chemo/rad.  Didn't have my Fitbit back then, but it does make you realize you should get up a little more but when you feel like absolute crap walking is the last thing you want to do.  Proud of you Mike, you seem to making strides even going through all this treatment.

Kim

NHMike
Posts: 214
Joined: Jul 2017

Got into the office early today (5:15 AM) and did some stuff and went to the gym and ran a mile on the treadmill. I didn't sleep well last night (GI pressure). The run felt great. I was quite sweaty afterwards, and let's say that my GI system felt a lot better afterwards (the run loosened things up a lot). No aches or pains and I could have gone a lot longer had I the time. I had to grab a quick shower, drink 24 ounces of water and then I have to go to the radiology place. I'd like to run some more but it's hot and humid today. I might go to the YMCA at lunchtime for another mile or two and some time on the machines. Haven't done the machines in probably two months.

NHMike
Posts: 214
Joined: Jul 2017

I was trimming a toenail and either accidentily sliced through a blister or popped it. Clear liquid came out with a little blood. I have four toes with blisters where the blister looks black - it's part of running and/or walking a lot. So I used a few alcohol towelettes to clean it off, applied antibiotic ointment and put on a couple of bandaids and then put silicone toe sleeves on five other toes that have similar problems. I think that I'm going to have to size up a half on running shoes.

I was out for my afternoon walk and felt pain on my left hip. I took a peek and saw a long piece of skin that had been scraped off. There was a little blister and just touching the area was painful. So I finished my walk, got out a bottle of alcohol, swabbed it down (it stung quite a bit) and put on a bandaid. I will check on it later to make sure that it doesn't become a bigger problem. I'm a bit concerned that it gets infected. I suspect that one of the radiology techs caused it when pulling down my shorts on the table. They generally do this as it would be awkward but it may be safer if I do it myself in the future.

Life is hazardous.

NHMike
Posts: 214
Joined: Jul 2017

8K steps per day the previous week so things are looking up right now. I'm not getting enough stuff with workouts but at least a little something (besides walking) every day.

NHMike
Posts: 214
Joined: Jul 2017

9K steps per day for this past week. I walked a mile in the waiting room of the Radiology Center for several days. Of course that meant that I couldn't do my floor stuff but it's good to get in the steps. I also ran 1.3 miles this morning. It felt quite good but I was pressed for time. I wanted to do weights in the gym but will have to settle for floor work at home. I tested out Depends Shields for the workout and they are decent though I don't think that I need them for really short workouts unless my GI system is really churning. Depends Shields are minimal protection pads for incontience. I turn them backwards and use them for leakage issues on the other side.

NHMike
Posts: 214
Joined: Jul 2017

I had a lot of work to do yesterday along with several errands so only got about 5,500 steps in but I got in a stretching workout and deadlifts, military press and squats on the barbell and it felt very good. It would feel great to do a full weights workout as that's High-Intensity Interval Training but I didn't have time for that (got in some early morning work). I'm going to go into the office if anyone wants to chat (my group knows about it) and I'm going to do a short presentation to another group on my situation that I work closely with as some have been asking about me not being in the office. I will try to get in more weight stuff at the office as they're much better equipped than my home gym. I have a tennis date tomorrow and I'll try to video it to show what tennis can look like on chemo and radiation.

bobby66
Posts: 69
Joined: May 2017

Do you guys work out also while having the Chemo? I feel so tired that  I dont even try. I have my cocktail put on wednesday and take it off on Friday. Wednesday till Sunday I don't have much energy. I was just wondering if any of you work out during treatment.

SandiaBuddy's picture
SandiaBuddy
Posts: 878
Joined: Apr 2017

For some of us, exercise seems to be a bit of a miracle drug.  When I felt my worse, I would go for a walk and often feel better.  After recovering from surgery, I did my usual routine, walking, biking, weight lifting and swimming, but geared down a bit.  There were certain lifts (squats, for example, and sit-ups) I could not do because of joint soreness.  I also cut my swimming down by 50%.  I am two weeks off chemo now and starting to regain a bit of my old stregnth.  Hopefully I will get back to where I once was.

NHMike
Posts: 214
Joined: Jul 2017

I was hitting tennis balls for half-an-hour once a week, doing some running, lifting and stretching during the week. Much less than usual though. What made it a lot harder was the radiation as stuff down there didn't take kindly to a lot of friction. I do sometimes get very tired though and sometimes have to take naps or get more sleep.

NHMike
Posts: 214
Joined: Jul 2017

35 Minute Hitting session: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R_ipaq4HTk0&feature=youtu.be

 

NHMike
Posts: 214
Joined: Jul 2017

Very strange the past two days. I worked out for ten minutes yesterday and felt exhausted from afternoon to evening. This morning I woke up at 4:30 AM and got into the office early and did 15 minutes of stretching and abs and then went down to the gym to workout for an hour (1 mile run, dumbbells, barbells, bodyweight) and felt great. I thought that I could go for another 30 minutes if I didn't have work to do. I did a test to see if I could get my heartrate up and I did get it up to 172 for a short period of time (I usually try to keep it below 160) - no chest pains at that level. I have been keeping it capped at 130 through the chemo and radiation.

I suspect that I had too much that wasn't BRAT yesterday, particularly nuts, that cause all kinds of GI problems. Last night I had a bunch of relatively simple carbs and those things are really good for aerobic work the next morning. I suspect that the next week will be up and down like this. Best case is that I get back to 50% of my old self in a few days.

NHMike
Posts: 214
Joined: Jul 2017

I ran four miles and did strength-training for two hours at the gym yesterday. The feeling was absolutely incredible. I imagine that it's a little as to what people on drugs feel like. I had a lot to eat and slept for a while during the day and I expect some soreness today. I also found 10% to 30% decreases in strength in various areas. I think that's normal for not having done regular strength-training for a few months. Unfortunately I'm really busy for a while with work and family stuff so I won't have a lot of days like yesterday but it's something that I look forward to sometime in the future. After surgery, recovery, chemo round 2.

 

NHMike
Posts: 214
Joined: Jul 2017

Played a full hour of tennis this evening including a set and won 6-0 (I have to be moving and playing well for this to happen). I was a bit tired and really sweaty as it seems to be pretty humid here this evening. It certainly felt good. I have been focusing on stretching and strength work this week and am seeing some improvements there. I've read that the radiation can make the connective tissue tight in the pelvic region and stretching helps to fight that. And I'd do the stretching, radiation or no as you lose some flexibility every week unless you actively fight it.

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Annabelle41415
Posts: 6181
Joined: Feb 2009

So glad that you are keeping up with that many activities.  Congratulations on the win on tennis.  That is a lot of hard work playing for a whole hour.  You'll always feel better when you get out and do something - keep up the great work.

Kim

Woodytele
Posts: 163
Joined: Apr 2017

NH Mike is a bulldog, I haven't attempted to get back into my tennis game yet, but it's an inspiration for all of us to keep on pushing. Go NHMike!

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BRHMichigan
Posts: 368
Joined: Jul 2017

Wish I had a fraction of your energy, Mike.  That is awesome.

NHMike
Posts: 214
Joined: Jul 2017

Any kind of workout starts out with a little and then a little more and a little more. I've run into lots of folks that have done C25K which is an 8-week program that takes a couch potato to running a 5K. I've seen people do this and then go on to run marathons. I've seen my mother at 80 start lifting weights. She had to stop after her heart attack in her 90s but I think that the strength-training helped her through the 80s.

NHMike
Posts: 214
Joined: Jul 2017

We're taking some time off in Boston (in-between the MRI, surgeon meeting next week) and my walking/running the past three days is 10+miles per day. This is what my activity levels would be like if I didn't work. I have to enjoy it while I can as it will go way down after surgery. My feet are a little sore right now too. And the activity can increase appetite.

Mikenh's picture
Mikenh
Posts: 777
Joined: Oct 2017

Testing out a mobile account on my phone. Tried some yoga balance poses yesterday. I will try to ramp up on these to help with recovery.

Trubrit's picture
Trubrit
Posts: 4827
Joined: Jan 2013

even if it means a name change.  

Tru

NHMike
Posts: 214
Joined: Jul 2017

How do you start a new thread? When I try, I get:

Error

The website encountered an unexpected error. Please try again later.
Trubrit's picture
Trubrit
Posts: 4827
Joined: Jan 2013

I just posted a test thread, to see if it would post or if the web page was having an issue. It posted, so I can't tell you why yours wouldn't. 

Keep trying though. Its probably just a glitch on their part. 

If you contiune to have problems, send them a message. They are excellent at responding promptly. 

Tru

Annabelle41415's picture
Annabelle41415
Posts: 6181
Joined: Feb 2009

After going out today and returned home just realized it was Friday the 13th.  Was glad that nothing happened while going out LOL.  I'm not one for the superstitions but makes you think if something just doesn't go right LOL.  Thanks for the test post

Kim

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