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Hello All

plsletitrain
Posts: 253
Joined: Jul 2017

I'm Patty.  I posted some replies on the existing threads but thought I'd drop by a hello to formally introduce myself.  First of all, I wanted to thank this forum as this has provided me with some hope and answers to questions that I sometimes forget to ask to my onco.  I've come to a realization to stay away from statistics, as they just give you a weak heart.  Rather, here are people, living testaments that I can still live for more years.  I'm only 30, diagnosed with Stage 3B.  To be honest my world shattered when I found out about it but in the end, I know I'm not an immortal, one day I'll have to die.  I just wish for more years as my sons are still very young.  Anyway, let's not think about sad thoughts.  I've just finished my 4th cycle of chemo.  I don't like it (who does?) but like most of you guys, we have to drag our butts because what choice do we have.  Chemo is not a walk in the park and I hope I could also be of help to some of you who are on the same path.  Cheers! 

Annabelle41415's picture
Annabelle41415
Posts: 6619
Joined: Feb 2009

Welcome to the boards.  I'm glad that you found us and have had some answers to your questions.  A lot of people here have been where you have so there is great information to obtain from this site.  Always different situations and different directions but always one goal - to be completely cancer free.  Please continue to use this board for support whenever you need to.  There will always be someone here to help you get through this.  You're so young and it has to be hard with small children.  I'm wishing you the best going forward.

Hugs! Kim

plsletitrain
Posts: 253
Joined: Jul 2017

Yes, it wasn't very easy given I'm only 30 and my kids aren't even talking yet!  Not only does cancer mess with our physicality, but it also tests our mental and emotional capacity.  Right after I was diagnosed, I really didn't know what to do.  Or first, I even didn't believe it.  But as the days went by, I've come to accept that this is happening.  That's one of the hardest things.  I'm a religious type of person so I've had it all surrendered to God.  But its not easy when you're still young and you have small kids.  I swear if this happened to me when my kids are all grown up and have stable jobs, I would just laugh this off.  I've always believed in "Thy will be done" and I just thought that this happened to me for a reason.  I've accepted that if God wanted to take me away, He'll be the one to decide.  He can kill me in a calamity, or a crime, or of cancer.  That's His decision.  But I pray for more years to spend with my kids.  They're my life.

Anyway, thanks for reading my long post.  You guys have no idea how you've made people stronger, both those who are registered members and those that are just lurking.

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1243
Joined: Feb 2015

Sorry you are here, but welcome to the boards.  From the time I was diagnosed until my surgery was REAL quick, less than 3 weeks.  And I found this place.  Really a great group of people.  As an aside, I am Stage IVB and mid 50s.  Before you know it, chemo will be done with chemo.  Hang in there.  Of course there are going to be the times where you think about cancer, but kick it out and be positive as much as possible.  And do things, even the little things that you like, as often as you can.  I napped to make sure I could go to baseball games in the evening and grabbed a cup of coffee and sandwhich at a local diner way more than I do normally just because it was fun and a nice break.  

plsletitrain
Posts: 253
Joined: Jul 2017

We're quite on the same boat, it was also real quick.  One terrible stomach pain and I'm rushed for emergency operation (they found the very large mass that was already about to erupt--they said had I been late for about a day, it would have erupted already).  Yes, I still work.  I take it both to recover financially and also, to make me forget about the effects of chemo.  I've always believed in the power of pyschology, so I distract myself so that I cannot feel the effects.  Sometimes I get emotional, I get to read your posts and you mentioned your ages and I'm like "If I reach 50 I'd be jumping for joy".  :( I think I belong to the fairly young patients for Colon cancer but going into the cancer center and seeing kids ages 5 or something undergo chemo breaks my heart more.  

darcher's picture
darcher
Posts: 287
Joined: Jun 2017

  I'm still not staged but got caught up in this a few weeks ago when I started bleeding and went to ER, then a colonscopy a few days later, then a CT scan a week or so after that.  The appointments and so forth are getting jumbled up.  Got a endoscopic ultrasound this week and then it's off to radiation and surgery sometime after that. It's been almost a month.  It's the waiting that's killing me.  So far I've been told it's operable and isolated. That's about it.

 I'm in the 50+ group.  Even old people can have young kids.  I've got a 3 year old and a five year old.  In the pic it's my little girl doing a selfie of sorts trying to be scary.   Between them and their mom It's what keeps me going and gives me a reason to trudge through this. 

 I'm curious though.  You said something about it erupting.  I haven't heard about that being a situation.  When I had the initial bleeding that's what prompted me to go in.  What's the consequences ?  I've had another bleeding incident last weekend but was told it was due to constipation and the tumour being very fragil and sensitive.  I was told to take laxative and lots of fiber and it stopped the bleeding but I'm still feeling plugged up like a slow drain. When you reach 50, you'll think this is no different than when you were 30 and want to live at least another 50 years.  There is just so much to do and so little time to do it in. 

 

 

plsletitrain
Posts: 253
Joined: Jul 2017

About the erupting thing..From what I understand, the mass was too big or too full already(sorry I really haven't asked my surgeon about that eruption thing--when he said it was most likely cancer I've totally lost in touch of the world) that it will erupt.  The consequence of course is it will poison me.  That's fatal.  If there's one thing I learned from how fast the events took place, it is that surgeons know a cancer-looking mass.  When he saw the CT scan he immediately said it is most likely malignant.  And he was correct.  The eruption happens inside.  The bleeding of stools is (I think) a symptom of the cancer, not the eruption.  I think since your team already knows the case, they have the complete data, they know when's the best time to operate and remove the mass (if its not removed by chemo/radiation).  

My kids are my strength too.  I know I've said I've surrendered it to all to God but He knows I'm not ready to die yet.  I'll kick cancer's butt to live.  I just hope I'll get better terms with chemo.  

The good thing with your case is  (I think) when you get operated, the stage will be lowered.  Hang in there! The waiting game is also a pain but that too shall pass.

SandiaBuddy's picture
SandiaBuddy
Posts: 1127
Joined: Apr 2017

Darcher:  You might consider pysllium seeds daily to keep things moving.  They helped me pre-surgery, and I have stuck with a teaspoon a day since then.  Also, be sure to avoid aspirin and the like which seem to annoy the tumor.  Something else to consider, pre-surgery, I kept my medical records scanned and available on my cell phone in case I needed emergency treatment.  There is always (I believe) the possibility of a blockage, so it is best to be prepared, especially if you travel.  Cheers.

NHMike
Posts: 214
Joined: Jul 2017

That's a brilliant idea. I keep my cancer blog and my contacts on my phone but having all the documents would be a great idea too.

JanJan63's picture
JanJan63
Posts: 2482
Joined: Sep 2014

Welcome Patty! I'm so sorry you're here. You're so young, geez. But they caught it in time to do something about it. I've shared this before but I'll share it again because it's a story of hope. My grandmother had colon cancer in the 1950's when she was in her fifties. They only did surgery and a colostomy. There wasn't chemo then. She passed away when she was in her early eighties- 83? I can't remember- and she died of kidney failuer, not cancer. Everyone's path goes differently but it shows what can happen.

I'll be looking forward to your posts and see how you progress. Good luck. Chemo sucks but its a means to an end and you do end up looking back once you feel better and being glad you did it. We do what we have to do to live. Some of it is worse than other things but the end is worth it. You'll find you;re a lot tougher than you ever knew you were and it's kind of cool to know that. The downside for me is that it gives me little patience with wimpy people.

Anyway, take care!

Jan  

plsletitrain
Posts: 253
Joined: Jul 2017

I've read your grandmother's story before (when I was still a lurker) and you have no idea how happy I was after reading it.  It was more schocking because no one in the family had it.  Just me.  I know this is just a challenge, a trial, to test me.  Some people might not have cancer but they have problems too.  And I'm lucky I have a supportive family.  That alone is enough to be thankful for.  

Stay positive and wishing you well!

ron50's picture
ron50
Posts: 1729
Joined: Nov 2001

                  It certainly is not nice to be 30 and diagnosed with cancer. I was 48 when I was dxed with stage 3 c colon cancer into 6 nodes. . I had 48 sessions of chemo over the course of a year. I always knew what I was doing next tuesday. It was not fun but I did everything they offerred . I am now 67. If everything goes to plan on jan 22 2018 I will end year 20 of surviva still ca freel. It has not been easy but I have gone from having a fourteen year old son to having two grand daughters. Hang in there, there is no telling what the future holds, best wishes Ron.

danker
Posts: 1264
Joined: Apr 2012

It is indeed hard to figure out God!  I was 77 when diagnosed. Now 85, have been NED for 7 years.  We must truely live life a day at a time.  Hope you become as old as me and see a couple generations down the line!!!

PamRav's picture
PamRav
Posts: 284
Joined: Jan 2017

Welcome, but so sorry for your diagnosis. 30 is so young but that also means your strong and up to the fight  There's a wealth of information and some really smart people here.  You'll find it's a great resource.    I wish you a smooth road ahead and hopefully you'll be NED before you know it. 

All the best.    Pam 

beaumontdave's picture
beaumontdave
Posts: 1091
Joined: Aug 2013

Welcome Patty, When the doctor who scoped me found the mass, he got on the phone to a surgeon and told them it was a rush job, that I was "sitting on a firecracker". I took it to mean that the tumor[he also called it old and crusty] was ready to shed cells everywhere. Maybe that's the "eruption" they have in mind. Anyway your in a good place to share and learn stuff, your young and strong and positive, so know that many 3b's get clear, this one's still working and raising the last kid[grandaughter] almost ten years later, currently free of that nasty stuff. It's a marathon we run, so keep a good thought, were running it with you.......................................Dave

JanJan63's picture
JanJan63
Posts: 2482
Joined: Sep 2014

Old and crusty? I'm sorry but that's funny. I'd have said 'yeah, but what about my tumour?'

Disgusting post alert! Don't go further if you're squeemish! This is gross but in case someone is curious, when I actually saw my tumour when I had the last colonscopy before starting treatment, it looked like a chunk of partially cooked and partially burnt steak. Some was pink, some was black, some was brown like cooked meat. Nasty.

Jan

plsletitrain
Posts: 253
Joined: Jul 2017

Thank you so much for your kind and encouraging words.  I think I just shed a tear. Yes, I will certainly live up to 50 more years.  I can do this! 

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