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Kaiser Surgeons - Los Angeles (WLA or Sunset)

KenJ27
Posts: 1
Joined: May 2017

Hello All,

I am newly diagnosed with prostate cancer, April 26, 2017, and considering robotic assisted surgery as an option.  I live in Los Angeles and I am a Kaiser member. Does anyone out there have any experience (good or bad ) with any surgeons at the WLA or Sunset facilities? Thank you. Ken 

hewhositsoncushions
Posts: 253
Joined: Mar 2017

Hi Ken

Realised no one had replied to you so thought I would say hello.

Welcome to the club!

I can't answer to your question. If you don't get anyone here, try some other forums - there may be some US or local ones that can help.

C

hopeful and opt...
Posts: 2218
Joined: Apr 2009

There are various prostate support groups in the LA area. ustoo is an international organization thst supports many of them. Look the up. 

I live on the other side of the orange curtain in northern orange county. If you are intersted in attending a support group in this area let me know.

By the way surgery is not the only way to treat; in fact, another treatment modality may be prefabable.....if you share your diagnosis history, we at this forum may give input for you consdieration, if you so wish.

 

Swingshiftworker
Posts: 1013
Joined: Mar 2010

Have you decided on surgery or are you only considering it as one of many options?  If the latter, here's my "sticky" on the topic.  You don't say anything about your diagnosis, so I don't know if it is entirely relevant to your case but it lists most of the commonly available and relevant options for men diagnoses w/early stage prostate cancer.  Hopefully, you'll find the info useful in making your treatment decision.

BTW, I was a life long member of Kaiser NorCal when I was diagnosed w/prostate cancer back in Jan 2010.  At that time, Kasier gave me only the choice of surgery or brachytherapy for treatment.  I didn't like those choices and was able to cancel my Kaiser membership and join Blue Shield which enabled me to get CyberKnife treatment at UCSF Medical Center in Sep 2010.  I experienced no side effects whatsoever from the treatment and have been cancer free ever since.

Kaiser did not offer Cyberknife for prostate cancer treatment at that time but I have been told that they offer it now and, if your Gleason score is a 6/7, I'd highly recommend that you consider Cyberknife for treatment instead of surgery for the reasons stated below.

The following is a duplicate of one that I have posted in various threads on this forum to give men newly diagnosed w/lower risk prostate cancer (Gleason 6 or 7) an overview of the treatment options available to them.

Anyone newly diagnosed with prostate cancer rated Gleason 6 (and usually Gleason 7) has all treatment options available to him and, since this cncer is considered "low risk", he has time to decide which choice is best for him.  So, the first thing a new prostate cancer patient should do is to do research on the available options before he actually has to make the decision regarding which treatment to choose.

The following is my response to other men who asked for similiar advice about the treatment choices avilable to them.  It's a summary of the available treatment options and my personal opinion on the matter.   You can, of course, ignore my opinion about which treatment choice I think is best.  The overview of the choices is still otherwise valid.

 . . .  People here know me as an outspoken advocate for CK and against surgery of any kind.  I was treated w/CK 6 years ago (Gleason 6 and PSA less than 10).  You can troll the forum for my many comments on this point.  Here are the highlights of the treatment options that you need to consider:

1)  CK (SBRT) currently is the most precise method of delivering radiation externally to treat prostate cancer.  Accuracy at the sub-mm level  in 360 degrees and can also account for organ/body movement on the fly during treatment.  Nothing is better.  Accuracy minimizes the risk of collateral tissue damage to almost nil, which means almost no risk of ED, incontinence and bleeding.  Treatment is given in 3-4 doses w/in a week time w/no need to take off time from work or other activities.

 2) IMRT is the most common form of external radiation now used.  Available everythere.  Much better accuracy than before but no where near as good as CK.  So, it comes with a slightly higher risk of collateral tissue damage resulting in ED, incontienence and bleeding.  Unless things have changed, IMRT treatment generally requires 40 treatments -- 5 days a week for 8 weeks -- to be completed.  I think some treatment protocols have been reduce to only 20 but I'm not sure.  Still much longer and more disruptive to your life than CK but, if CK is not available, you may have no other choice.

 3) BT (brachytherapy).  There are 2 types: high dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR).  HDR involves the temporary placement of rradioactive seeds in the prostate.  CK was modeled on HDR BT.  LDR involves the permanent placement of radioactive seens in the prostate.  1/2 life of the seeds in 1 year during which time you should not be in close contact w/pregnant women, infants and young children.  The seeds can set off metal/radiation detectors and you need to carry an ID card which explains why you've got all of the metal in your body and why you're radioactive.  Between HDR and LDR, HDR is the better choice because with LDR, the seeds can move or be expelled from the body.  Movement of the seeds can cause side effects due to excess radiation moving to where it shouldn't be causing collateral tissue damage -- ED, incontinence, bleeding, etc.   Both HDR and LDR require a precise plan for the placement of the seeds which is done manually.  If the seeds are placed improperly or move, it will reduce the effectiveness of the treatment and can cause collateral tissue damage and side effects.  An overnight stay in the hospital is required for both.  A catheter is inserted in your urethra so that you can pee.  You have to go back to have it removed and they won't let you go until you can pee on your own after it's removed.

 4) Surgery -- robotic or open.   Surgery provides the same potential for cure as radiation (CK, IMRT or BT) but which MUCH GREATER risks of side effects than any method of radiation.  Temporary ED and incontinence are common for anywhere from 3-12 months BUT also sometimes permanently, which would require the implantation of an AUS (artificial urinary sphincter) to control urination and a penile implant to simulate an erection to permit penetration (but would not restore ejaculative function).  Removal of the prostate by surgery will also cause a retraction of the penile shaft about 1-2" into the body  due to the remove of the prostate which sits between the interior end of the penis and the bladder.  Doctors almost NEVER tell prospective PCa surgical patients about this.  A urologist actually had the to nerve to tell me it didn't even happen when I asked about it.   Don't trust any urologist/surgeon who tells you otherwise.  Between open and robotic, open is much better in terms of avoiding unintended tissue cutting/damage and detection of the spread of the cancer.  Robotic requires much more skill and training to perform well; the more procedures a doctor has done the better but unintended injuries can still occur and cancer can be missed because the doctor has to look thru a camera to perform the surgery which obstructs his/her field of vision.

 4) You may also want to consder active surveillance (AS), which is considered a form of treatment without actually treating the cancer.  You just have to get regular PSA testing (usually quarterly) and biopsies (every 1-2 years, I believe) and keep an eye out for any acceleration in the growth of the cancer.  Hopeful and Optimistic (who has already posted above) has already mentioned this and is your best source of info on this forum about it. 

 I personally could not live w/the need to constantly monitor the cancer in my body.  Like most other men, I just wanted it delt with.  Some men gravitate to surgery for this reason, thinking that the only way to be rid of it is to cut it out, but I did not like the risks presents by surgery and opted for CK, which is a choice I have NEVER regretted.  I am cancer free, there is no indication of remission, there were no side effects and my quality of life was never adversely affected.  Other men on this forum have reported similiar results.

 So, for obvious reasons, I highly recommend that you consder CK as your choice of treatment.  The choice seems obvious when you consider the alternatives but you'll have to decide that for yourself.

 Good luck!

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