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Hi. I'm new here, I'm scared and I need support.

WhatIsLife's picture
WhatIsLife
Posts: 38
Joined: Dec 2016

Hello. The past few months have been one hell of a roller coaster for me. I'm ready to get off the ride but it doesn't seem to ever end!

In the begining of September of this year, I was diagnosed with Kidney Cancer. The Urologist told me I had a large tumor on my right kidney, and that it, and the kidney, would have to be removed. The good news, he said, was there was no indication that the cancer had spread.

So a few weeks later, on September 29th, I had the kidney and the cancer removed, and again, the doctor told me we got it in time, before it had spread. I was feeling good, felt I had dodged a bullet.

Then, a little over a month later, I had an MRI done on my lower back because I have a back injury that dates back years, and my back doctor does routine MRI's and X-rays every few years to see how it is progressing, and what they see is "lesions...concerning for possible metastatic disease."

So I tell my doctor and in December they do a Bone Scan and a MRI Thoracic Spine Scan and find a bunch of lesions "consistent with metastatic disease." Now it seems the only thing left is a Needle Biopsy, which they will be doing on the 27th. And during all this I got myself an Oncologist.

Now my doctors are waiting on the Needle Biopsy before confirming it really is cancer....right now they are just calling it "suspicious." butm it's been my experience it it walks like a duck, it's a duck. And it's obvious they are just trying to give me a little hope.

But what I can't seem to grasp is how, in just 3 months, I went from having treatable cancer to having no cancer to now suddenly having terminal cancer? This has happened so fast that it all seems like some colossal joke.

Has anyone else ever gone through something this crazy and how did you handle it? My emotions are raw right now. It's like I'm waiting for the next shoe to drop. I guess once they get the results of the Needle Biopsy they can give me more information on life expectancy, at least I hope, but since they were so wrong about the cancer in the first place, I just don't know what to think.

Thank you for listening to me, and any advice would be greatly appreciated. This is all so new to me and I am trying to figure a way to put this all in some sort of perspective. Again, thanks for listening!

Kevin

 

icemantoo's picture
icemantoo
Posts: 3278
Joined: Jan 2010

Kevin,,

There are many on this board, some doing extremely well with mets after RCC surgery (they were probably there before the surgery). There are a number of new meds  available to the onc. and hopefully if this walks like a duck they will get to the bottom of this. Heres to  good results and if not treatable results. 

When I started my journey 14 plus years ago little was available where it had matastizied. Now there are many options which will follow my comment

 

Icemantoo

WhatIsLife's picture
WhatIsLife
Posts: 38
Joined: Dec 2016

Hi Icemantoo,

Thank you for you encouraging words. My Oncologist did tell me something similar, such as new meds being made available and that they're always coming up with new treatments, but I feel better hearing it from someone not being paid to say that, if that makes sense. Congradulations on fourteen years! I am happy for you, but to completely honest, in a selfish way, that really gives me hope!

Kevin  

Jojo61's picture
Jojo61
Posts: 1310
Joined: Oct 2013

Welcome to the club nobody wants to enjoy - and it is one heck of an initiation! I am glad you finally got yourself an oncologist. Could you tell us what state you live in (I assume you are in US). I think others here could recommend the best oncologist for you. What stage/grade was your tumor? Was it RCC? Chromophobe?

I had a 13 cm tumor and right nephrectomy in December 2013. It was stage 3 RCC and grade 2, with lymphovascular invasion. No other treatment done, and  so far I have been blessed with no recurrence. But everyone's story is so different. Kidney cancer works differently on each person. However, there are others here who have gone through similar stories as you. There has been lots of great treatments developed lately, so please don't lose hope. We have many who have been stage 4 and doing well for years! I am sure they will chime in soon and share their experiences and advice for you.

I know it must feel like you have been punched in the gut. But hang in there! We will help you through this!

Hugs

Jojo

WhatIsLife's picture
WhatIsLife
Posts: 38
Joined: Dec 2016

Hi Jojo,

Thank you for welcoming me in the club, although it is a club I would skip is given a choice, but I'm sure that goes for everybody. I live in Florida, in Tampa. I currently see an oncologist from the Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute. When I found all this out, I chose this oncologist, Dr Matthew Fink, because I saw him a few years ago after my GP sent me to him when my red blood cells were high, and my GP thought I should have that check out, especially since at the time I was a heavy smoker. Turned out the high red blood cell count wasn't anything to be concerned about, at least I don't think there was any connection to that and my current dilemma as that was over three years ago - but when I got this diagnosis, I remembered that oncologist so I made an appointment with him. But I'm open to suggestions.

My tumor was renal cell carcinoma, and my urologist orignally said it was stage 3, but once it was removed and he could see it with his own eyes, he said it was actually smaller than he orignally thought, more like a stage 2. He gave it a grade but I don't remember what it was because at the time what was important to me was his diagnosis that I was cancer free, and that I could get back to normal after I had healed from the surgery. As for it being Chromophobe, I don't think so, but I could be wrong. I had to look that up on Google because I didn't even know what that was, and it's possible the doctor mentioned it, but if he did, it went right over my head.

In fact, if I had not had the MRI done on my back because of my back injury, I wouldn't know today that the cancer had metastasized. Sometimes I wish I didn't have that MRI but I know that's foolish thinking.

I'm very happy to hear you haven't had any recurrence with you cancer and I hope it stays that way, although I don't know what lymphovascular invasion is, but it seems you have a good handle on it, and I admire that. I hope to gain as much knowledge on my condition as I can because I realize that equals power, but I'm finding a lot of hope from reading stories from people like you! I really appreciate it!

Kevin

rhominator's picture
rhominator
Posts: 233
Joined: Nov 2015

Hi Kevin. As icemantoo said, don't lose hope.  Like many others here, I'm stage 4 (via a bone met).  My wife reminded me that I just had my 3 year anniversary of my neph.  When I got my diagnosis, I was semi-retired and we thought the worst--social security diability, final plans, etc.  But things took a different turn: this year I happlily accecpted a full-time job working for NASA. Quite the opposite direction than where I thought I was heading.  So, again, don't lose hope.

WhatIsLife's picture
WhatIsLife
Posts: 38
Joined: Dec 2016

Stories like yours really are making me feel better. This is all so new to me I don't know what to think, but I'm hearing all these different perspectives and I think slowly I'm coming out of my fog and realize that it's not the immediate death sentence that I guess I imagine it would be, and by that I mean death of way of life - look at you - you've actually started a new job! Good for you. I guess in the back of my head I was thinking tomorrow I would end up in a hospital gown, laying in bed all day looking out the window, but it's good to know there is life after the diagnoses! Thank you.

Kevin

Footstomper's picture
Footstomper
Posts: 1238
Joined: Dec 2014

I bet it wasnt your oncologist. In fact I'd be fairly willing to bet s/he said incurable and you heard terminal - at least thats what I did. I'm another 3year survivor - lets say 3 1/2. I was diagnosed in May2013 had my kidney removed along with a 10cm tumour leaving only the mets in my lungs. Diagnosed Stage 4 (Big and spreading) and Grade 4 (spreading aggressively). I was doomed. Still, I looked at where I'd been, what I'd done, who I'd met and it hadnt been such a bad life.

And then I didnt die. Incurable is not the same as terminal.

I've been on a number of different treatments over the years, some have worked, some havent. Some had horrible side effects (buy soft moist flushable toilet paper) some didnt.And here I am chugging along towards my 3rd christmas.

There are a whole new raft of new treatments coming on line and I truely believe that this disease is going to take the same journey as HIV/AIDS. In the 80's and 90's it was a death sentence now it is a treatable (if incurable) chronic disease. We are heading in the same direction.

So dont worry Kevin. Some things in life are bad, they can really make you sad

Otherthings can make you cry and curse

Youre chewing on lifes gristle, but I reckon the diagnosis was the worst.

Good luck

Stomper

WhatIsLife's picture
WhatIsLife
Posts: 38
Joined: Dec 2016

Now that I think about it, I don't think anyone said "terminal" but me. I haven't even got a full diagnoses yet as I'm waiting to have a needle biopsy done, but when the oncologist told me the scans had found all these lesions on my bones and that they were all consistent with metastasizing cancer, and that really was the only explanation for them, a lot of what he said after that probably went over my head. From what I'm hearing, I guess that's fairly common.

I do remember him telling me about there being all sorts of medications available, and how he's had patients who have survived years on one medication and when that one stopped working they tried another, and how there are clinical trials, but still, like you said, all I was thinking is I am doomed!

Well, I am glad I joined this support group because I am finding out my thinking was way off the mark, but apparently pretty common. I guess it's only human nature to think the worse.

I'm glad you are doing well. I hope I am able to adopt your type of attitude towards this whole cancer thing, because it's looking to me if one doesn't want to go crazy, that's what one has to do. Thank you again for your encouraging words.

Kevin

foroughsh's picture
foroughsh
Posts: 779
Joined: Oct 2014

It's not a terminal desease anymore, many drugs and treatments are available now. So do your best to remain positive and don't lose your hope. I know it's easier said than done but many stage four members with stable or shrinked Mets and long term survivors prove you should remain hopeful and vigilant.

Forough

WhatIsLife's picture
WhatIsLife
Posts: 38
Joined: Dec 2016

I am learning a lot here, and that it is a manageable disease is probably the most important. I guess when you don't have cancer, you don't really think much about it, at least I didn't, which is crazy because cancer runs in my family. My father died from liver cancer, and I had a brother die from non hodgkin's lymphoma, and another brother who had non hodgkin's lymphoma but survived it. Yet despite all this, I think I was in denial and figured cancer would somehow just pass me by. But you are right, meeting long term survivors does give me hope to remain strong.

(Now that I think about it: My brother that died from non hodgkin's lymphoma died from it in the late 1970s when I was just a kid, and my other brother that survived it had it about 8 years ago, and I guess that shows how far they have come in means of treatment over the years.)

Kevin

foroughsh's picture
foroughsh
Posts: 779
Joined: Oct 2014

Yes, you're right. About kidney cancer's treatment s it's clear that im last five, six years they have done a huge progress, as rcc doesn't respond to chemotherapy so those with advanced cancer used to have low chance of surviving but oncologists have come up with targeted therapy, immunotherapy, radiotherapy,... And these are Promising. So the survival rate that you see on the internet is so very oit of dated.

Forough

hardo718's picture
hardo718
Posts: 853
Joined: Jan 2016

.....to keep things in perspective when you're trying to adjust to the initial gut punch, and then you've got the family history to refer back to.  But as many have said, the progress being made is truly incredible lately.  I've had kidney cancer and have 5 friends that have cancer of different types; prostate, 2 with breast, thymus, bladder and all are doing fairly well on various different treatments.  I guess my message is not to lose hope, even though you find yourself on this crazy wild roller coaster.

Celebrate life,

Donna~

WhatIsLife's picture
WhatIsLife
Posts: 38
Joined: Dec 2016

...at least it did for me, but I think I am getting it back, thanks to all the common sense and feedback I've been getting here on this support network. There is a lot of common sense here, something you won't get from any doctor. I'm not putting down doctors, but people living with cancer 24/7 know the score. Thanks Donna for your encouraging words, and I do think this roller coaster I've been on might finally be slowing down a bit!

Kevin

Jojo61's picture
Jojo61
Posts: 1310
Joined: Oct 2013

Kevin, don't be hard on yourself....we have all been there! We all jump to the worst conclusion when you hear that "C" word....and given the history in your family, it would be a bit panicky. This of course still needs to be taken seriously. And I want to reinforce my concern - see a highly recommended RCC oncologist. Please! Even though there are many great treatments out there, this is still all fairly new, and kidney cancer is unique. I am from Canada so I cannot recommend anyone for your area. Can I please suggest that you join another cancer forum called Smartpatients. A lot of us here belong to that one too. There is another wealth of information there. Please inquire about recommended RCC oncologists (in Canada we call them uro-oncologist). Let me know how that goes!

Hugs

Jojo

WhatIsLife's picture
WhatIsLife
Posts: 38
Joined: Dec 2016

I had not heard of Smart Patients, so I looked it up and it looks promising. I'm always interested in any site, be it online or in person, that offers help and/or information. Tampa is the home to the Moffitt Cancer Center, which I understand to be rated #6 in the United States for cancer treatment, at least by U.S. News & World Report. In fact, I just found out Moffitt has support groups for cancer patients every Tuesdays between 1-2pm, and I am going to try to go to some of these support group meetings which will give me a good chance to check out the place.

I think it's part of the University of South Florida campus, which is huge - I had to go there for one of my bone scans, although I'm not sure if it's part of USF or not. So much to learn! Thanks for the suggestions and thanks for your concerns, it really helps a lot!

Kevin

Rob57's picture
Rob57
Posts: 25
Joined: Aug 2016

I was diagnosed almost five years ago. There was a tumor in my left kidney with the largest dimension 7.1 cm (stage 2). It was removed no problem and no other signs of cancer. MRI a year later showed all clear, but the next year the MRI showed a tumor in the lymph node in my chest. Had a biopsy done which was negative, however the surgeon who took the biopsy said that it looked like cancer to him. Also had a PET scan and it showed activity in the area. I did not have an oncologist at the time so I met with one and discussed options. Due to the vaugness of the diagnosis we decided to wait 2 or 3 months to see what it did. In that time the tumor increased in size so we decided on radiation followed with chemotherapy. The tumor was radiated at the end of October 2014. Every weekday for three weeks. The radiological oncologist initially said that she would do five weeks, but after some thought she decided to shorten the time and increase the daily dose. The only side effect that I had was a sore throat for a few weeks. In January my wife and I went Spain on vacation and had a great time. At the end of January I had another MRI scan that showed the the tumor was greatly reduced.  Before treatment the tumor was 5.6cm, now it is 2.1cm and has stayed that way since the radiation a little more than two years ago. I started taking Votirent 800 mgd/day in February, 2015 with some side effects, not bad and they are managable for me. This coming February will mark 2 years on Votrient. I had been getting scans every three months since January 2015. The last time I went to the oncologist there was no change (which is a good thing in my case) and we decided to wait 6 months instead of the normal 3 or 4 for the next visit.

I know that this is hard to process, but from now on you need to think about this disease as something that can be managed and treated. Everyone is different and everyone reacts differently to treatment. The most important thing for me is to understand my current situation and understand the options available to me, then act accordingly. There is no such thing as knowing too much when it comes to dealing with this condition.  

I do not speculate on what might be because it really does me no good. You need to listen to your doctors and not be afraid to ask questions, but remember that at the end of the day it is still your body and you need know what is going on with it.  All I can say is that it gets easier. The worst part of this whole process for me was the minutes after my doctor gave me the initial diagnosis of cancer. When I got the news about the tumor in my chest 2 years later it was of course concerning to me, but nowhere near as frightening as the first time. I have come to realise that my condition is just something that I have to deal with. Don't let this disease define you, there is still plenty of life ahead for you and you need to focus on that. I hope that this helps somehow. I wish you as much luck as I can.

foxhd's picture
foxhd
Posts: 3183
Joined: Oct 2011

We are living with cancer, not dieing from cancer.

WhatIsLife's picture
WhatIsLife
Posts: 38
Joined: Dec 2016

Those are words to live by! Thanks for reminding me, foxhd. I appreciate it.

jtobeck's picture
jtobeck
Posts: 1
Joined: Dec 2016

You and I are in the same age group.  Found a tumor on my right kidney while doing an ultrasound for something else.  Had a right radical nephrectomy on 21 November.  Stage T3A Fuhrman grade of 3.  Tumor was 10-15 lbs.  I am in that wait and see stage, and go in for a baseline CT in January.

Take heart.  There are many treatments available.  You don't mention what part of the country you are in, but get to a place that has a good GU oncology department. I went to MD Anderson (Houston) and can highly recommend it.

My faith has helped me to worry about the things I can change and let the rest go.

 

WhatIsLife's picture
WhatIsLife
Posts: 38
Joined: Dec 2016

Hi jtobeck. Yes, we do seem to have similar situations. I am finding out from all the wonderful people here about the different treatments available and how they have helped them, and I think maybe you're talking about the serenity prayer, something I used to say a lot when I quit drinking many years ago, and prehaps it wouldn't hurt to start saying that again! Thanks.

Kevin

Jojo61's picture
Jojo61
Posts: 1310
Joined: Oct 2013

It sounds like you already have a great handle on this! Good for you! I hope your baseline CT goes very well, and keep up with your follow up scans!

Hugs

Jojo

Jan4you's picture
Jan4you
Posts: 1326
Joined: Oct 2013

Hi there Kevin! Glad you found this site with the most wonderful people who truly want to inform and support you!

It is okay to feel any way you are, because are feelings are not right nor wrong..they are simply our emotions.

But as you gain more information and a follow a treatment plan you'll already have built up this support group! We'll be here for you on your journey if you want us to, I mean.

Besides you don't even know yet what these "lesions" are, right? No matter what, WE'll be here for you, why? Because you deserve it!

Sending you calming thoughts, peace of mind with a huge dose of serenity my dear!

Hugs, Jan

WhatIsLife's picture
WhatIsLife
Posts: 38
Joined: Dec 2016

I have met some wonderful people here, and I am already feeling 100% better! The sincerity and generosity of everyone is outstanding. I'm almost at a loss for words, but this time it's not out of sadness, it's out of relief - relief that I have found a commuity of people who know exactly how I feel because, I guess, in a strange way, I wasn't even sure how I felt, just that I had all these emotions drving me crazy. That's true about the lesions, although I'm pretty sure what they are, but I'd be happy to be proven wrong! But either way, it's good to know I won't have to go through it alone. Thank you!

Kevin

donna_lee's picture
donna_lee
Posts: 962
Joined: Feb 2009

It's a word for a bus or train or plane stop on a trip.

You look like a pretty big guy.  So pull up your big guy pants and give it H***.  Of course, it helps to know exactly what you are fighting and those kinds of details, but you are on the right path at this time.  Perhaps if you had had the MRI or bone scan earlier....but hindsight is not the best for diagnosis.

For myself, I handled a lot of 2-4-D (same as agent orange) on our farm; and about 35 years later I was D'xd with cancer.  Who knew then it was going to cause problems for those who were exposed to it?  Oobviously, not me.  And I probably wouldn't have been more cautious, either.

On this board, it helps to have a sense of humor-for groaners, the macabre, and the belly laughs.

You're not going to die soon, you have a lot more living to do, so get on with living your live with the NEW YOU.

Hugs,

donna-lee

WhatIsLife's picture
WhatIsLife
Posts: 38
Joined: Dec 2016

I'm already a new person in the two days since I orignally wrote that first post, thanks to all the great advice and support I've got from everybody. I was like a little child when I first came here but already I feel stronger and capable, and I'm glad to hear that about a sense of humor because I've been told that's what mine is. I never worked with chemicals but I was a heavy smoker and I always figured if I got cancer, it would be lung cancer, but here I am ending up with kidney cancer, as if it makes some sort of difference. Crazy me! Anyway, thanks Donna-lee for the advice.

Kevin

rwmiller56's picture
rwmiller56
Posts: 40
Joined: Nov 2016

Hi, Kevin,

As we discussed over on my thread, we have similar situations and are about the same age group. I also was a heavy smoker for 40 years, 1-2 packs/day.

My met diagnosis was really shocking to me, because my primary kidney tumor was only 3.3 cm, and was graded T1b, Fuhrman Grade 2. So it seemed like a no-brainer that this thing would not metastasize. In fact, the docs had given me an 85% chance that it would not. You know the rest of the story... That met was probably there at the time of nephrectomy, but was too small for detection.

After the met diagnosis, I spent a few weeks wallowing in self pity. But once I started hearing the stories from people in this forum, it gave me some hope, and then the strength to close that door behind me, and to look forward to opening new ones.  I moved my treatment over to Stanford Cancer Center, where I went to a few seminars, talked to a few cancer patients, and of course met my new oncologists.

JoJo mentioned it, and it is good advice, I believe, to have a Urological Oncologist, as RCC seems to behave differently and is treated differently than other cancers. I also have a general oncologist who oversees my case, but the RCC oncologist recommends which treatments should be performed. Actually, they all collaborate together, including the radiation oncologist. It's a good team.

Which bone(s) is your met located? Mine is in the inferior ramus bone in the lower pelvis, down in the pubic area (yeah, nice place for it...), and has been ruled non-resectable (inoperable) by the docs. I start radiation treatment next week.

I'm wishing you all the best. Once again, the folks on this forum are fantastic, and can offer great support and hope. We are not alone! Have a Happy Holiday!

Roger

WhatIsLife's picture
WhatIsLife
Posts: 38
Joined: Dec 2016

When I first was diagnosed with kidney cancer, I have to admit, I didn't really pay much attention to specifics, I guess I went into immediate denial. The urologist explained to me things like the size and grade but all that went went over my head...I just wanted to know is what can be done about it, and is it "terminal." He told me it has taken over my right kidney so in order to remove the cancer, he will have to remove my kidney, but that I can live with one kidney with no problem. This I already knew because I had a sister-in-law who had kidney disease, so I knew a little about that.

Then of course I wanted to know if the cancer had spread. My urologist told me there were no indications that it had, and before surgery he did some more tests to be sure...and then after surgery he told me I was cancer free, but I would need to be monitored and he wanted me to come back and see him in three months for a follow up. In the meantime, to take it easy and let the incisions heal....and in about 6 weeks I should be able to get back to normal life.

So I was feeling rather cocky I guess. So when a few weeks later I had a routine MRI done on my back, for an old back injury, and it showed lesions "consistent with metastatic disease," my world came crumbling down.

I went to my urologist and found an oncologist, but while I was waiting to see the oncologist, the urologist ordered a bone scan and a thoracic MRI spine scan. A few days after the tests, the urologist called me at home, on a late Friday afternoon, and gave me the bad news, and really, of all the things he said, the only thing I remember him saying is "the prognosis is poor." So I sunk even lower.

About a week later, I finally saw the oncologist who expalined the tests in a more approachable way, and who also told me much of what everyone here has said, but still, my world was spinning so fast I don't think I caught much of what he said. He did tell me that it's not an immediate death sentence, that there's many medications and therapies available, and if those don't work, there are drug trials available, etc., and I shouldn't give up hope, but I really don't think I believed him until I came to this board, in a panic, and heard the same thing from everyone else who has actually gone through it. That made me a believer, so now I can accept it.

Right now I think I'll stick with my urologist, although his bedside manner needs a little work, and my oncologist who I have a little history with, but I'm always open to suggestions as to what kind of doctor I should see. I'm having a needle biopsy done Dec 27th, which I imagine should tell the docs and me how bad it is, or maybe that it's not so bad.

And I'm going back through my lab reports becasue I guess it's time I learn about my disease. Looks like my tumor was pretty big:

-Tumor size: 6.3 x 6.1 x 6.0 cm

--Furman Nuclear Grade: G3

As for which bones the met is located, here is what the bone scan says:

MRI THORACIC SPINE WITHOUT AND WITHOUT CONTRAST:

"There are multiple enhancing lesions as follows: Right scapula, Left pedicle at C7, anterior body T2, spinous process at T3. T6 vertebral body, right lamina at T8, expansile lesion left rib at T8, 2 lesions in the T10 vertebral body body left pedicle T11, and T12 vertebral body. There appears to be epidural extension on the left side at T11 but there is no canal compromise. No pathologic fracture is noted. There is a Schmorl's node in the superior endplate of T12."

Now what the hell that means, who knows? The Bone Scan findings are also in a similar, foreign language. My oncologist hasn't said anything about surgery being an option, and if I remember right he did say chemo is not an option at this point, but I'm guessing I'll find out more once I have the needle biopsy done.

The old me would be googling all that, but I've learned that only drives me even more crazy so I'm going to wait until I see the doc again and I'll be more prepared, and less emotional, and I'll get him to explain it to me.

But I agree with you with you 100% - the folks on the forum are fantastic! I hope the radiation treatment has only positive results for you. And happy holidays to you and yours!

Kevin

Footstomper's picture
Footstomper
Posts: 1238
Joined: Dec 2014

Anecdotally I would say thats a medium to small size. Of course to you thats going to sound enormous. Mine was 10cm, I think Jojo's was about 15cm. My largest met has just gone down from 6cm to 3.5. So no need to panic.

gregslovey
Posts: 33
Joined: Oct 2016

Hi Kevin, My husband had a 10 cm mass on his left kidney...it was removed and he was "all clear" for five years.  It came back in May with lesions in his lungs, thyroid, pancreas and lymph nodes.  I cried for days....but I'm a nurse so I went to work... Scans, Oncologists and such.  He did High Dose IL2 first and that didn't do anything, but he has been on Votrient for six months and his tumors are shrinking and disappearing.

My best advice is to get someone you trust to go with you to the appointments.  They will hear things that you won't.  Keep a journal of what you are told and questions you want to ask....and make the doc take the time to answer them.  The doctor will have a nurse, and she/he will know A LOT....so use them for anything you need answered.  Our nurse Jada has been amazing.  Also, it's hard to wait for the scans after treatment to see if they worked, but wait you will : )

It is scary.  And it will change your life.  But it is a livable life as so many on here have already told you. 

Good luck as you navigate with all of us here : )

Toni

Deanie0916
Posts: 316
Joined: Nov 2016

I am glad to read all of your posts and see that you are feeling more hopeful. I am sending up prayers for you as you get these tests, I pray for peace and hope in your heart. God bless.

rwmiller56's picture
rwmiller56
Posts: 40
Joined: Nov 2016

Hi, Kevin,

Wishing you a Happy New Year, and all the best in any upcoming treatment. All my thoughts and prayers are with you.

I just finished radiation treatment on my bone met, and am back to wait and see mode.

Take care,

Roger

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