CSN Login
Members Online: 0

You are here

Does your grade change?

JanJan63's picture
JanJan63
Posts: 2482
Joined: Sep 2014

So when I originally had the cancer two years ago and had the surgery, etc. I was graded at 3B with three out of eleven lymph nodes involved. Now that I have mets in my lung am I a stage 4? Or does the grading stay the same as it was originally? I can ask my onc but I don't have an appointment for a few weeks and I'm just wondering. I had my mapping for the radiation this morning. Yuck...

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1328
Joined: Feb 2015

And I think the mets to the lungs makes it a Grade 4.

http://www.cancer.org/cancer/colonandrectumcancer/detailedguide/colorectal-cancer-staged

But s---w the grading.  Like the stats, just numbers which can do more harm than good to us emotionally.   My Onc told me even if it is mets to lungs for me, he will just go in and knock it out  (I am IIIC, heavy lymph nodes, went through wall.  Otherwise really good health.  Go figure. :))  

Hang in there J.J.

John23's picture
John23
Posts: 2140
Joined: Jan 2007



Normal
0


Grades….

You keep the original stage. If you have mets, they are noted as “stage #, with metastasis to ____ and ____.

Some physicians may suggest a different stage, but according to all documentation, it remains the same.

Please note:

A cancer’s stage does not change

An important point some people have trouble understanding is that the stage of a cancer is determined only when (or soon after) the cancer is diagnosed. This stage does not change over time, even if the cancer shrinks, grows, spreads, or comes back after treatment. The cancer is still referred to by the stage it was given when it was first found and diagnosed, although information about the current extent of the cancer is added (and of course, the treatment is adjusted as needed).

From here: http://www.cancer.org/treatment/understandingyourdiagnosis/staging

Does it really matter?

My initial DX from the radiologist was “3C, pending surgeon’s findings”. The surgeons found me to be a 4. I was told two different things by two different Oncolgists and desired to believe the “3c”. The treatments offered were both exactly the same and both for a late stage 4. That was in 2006. In 2010, another surgeon confirmed the “stage 4” as being the original dx.

Does it really matter?

The most important thing with the diagnosis of any stage cancer, is to prepare for the worst as an immediate act, and look for the best as the long-term goal. Continue to live life as you have been and enjoy as much as you can of it. Listen to your inner being; your intuition. Listen to your inner voice that provides the will to live, it will provide you with the direction you need.

 

Make cancer an incidental thing; don’t fear it.

 

Be well!

 

John

 

lizard44's picture
lizard44
Posts: 409
Joined: Apr 2015

refer to it as restaging.   You were diagnosed at  stage 3B  then restaged as  Stage 4 once the mets  were  found. It's less complicated for me, I was diagnosed with stage 4  from the initial PET scan  showing a  lit up liver spot right after the colonoscopy and  biopsy of the rectal tumor.  Hoping all goes well with your radiation therapy.

JanJan63's picture
JanJan63
Posts: 2482
Joined: Sep 2014

Thanks you guys, I should have said stage, not grade. I love how people on here keep things in perspective. I'm still feeling very positive and think that I'm going to beat this. Most of the time, anyway. I had to ask for anti-depressants the last time I was at the doctor's because I'm having some really dark days more often than I think is normal. Just to get me through for a while.

Jan

beaumontdave's picture
beaumontdave
Posts: 1130
Joined: Aug 2013

I was 3b, but if asked I say stage 4, which is metastasis to other, distant points or organs, seems more of an accurate expression of the situation, even if not in line with medical jargon. As far as taking medication to help you through one of the tougher things folks deal with in this here life, I say, what ever works, what ever gets you through........................Dave

John23's picture
John23
Posts: 2140
Joined: Jan 2007



Normal
0


Cancer Stage Stigma

One issue that we don’t talk about much, is the stigma attached to a stage four diagnosis.

As one physician mentioned to me - some institutions, and most insurance companies treat a stage four a bit differently, since the “terminal” aspect is more pronounced with a more “serious” stage of cancer. For that reason, being considered as “terminal” can work against the cancer patient.

Just his opinion perhaps?

I personally know of too, too many stage one and stage two cancer victims that have died within two years of their diagnosis. As far as I’m concerned, cancer is terminal. Some live longer than others, but if the body allows a defective cell to remain, sooner or later it will be a problem once again.

It always bothered me to hear an individual tell a cancer patient, that they’ll be OK because a stage 1 or 2 can be cured. My neighbor died not too long ago of “stage 1 melanoma” just about a year after his DX. Another friend died of stage 1 colon cancer not quite a year after his DX.

But telling someone you’re stage four brings gasps….. It’s the stigma.

Just more %^&* to think about in the idle moments we don’t think about cancer.

Eat well, be healthy.

John

lizard44's picture
lizard44
Posts: 409
Joined: Apr 2015

 of a stage 4 diagnosis is not as great as it once was as more people learn about  cancer. I still have people  say, upon learning that I have  stage 4 cancer,  they hope I'll be cured, but most  seem to understand that while a stage 4  diagnosis is not a  sentence of imminent death, and although  miracles do happen, it is not  generally  a curable condition, either, but more like a chronic disease that can be managed. The long term stage 4 survivors who post here here are proof  that it can be  managed or held at bay for  quite a few years and that  people can enjoy a  relatively good  quality of life despite the cancer. As more people learn about  highly visible people  like  Coach Bruce de Haven of the Panthers, country singer Wade Hayes and President  Carter who  are  living productively with  stage 4  cancer, I think   the stigma will eventually  go away.  I know  cancer  will kill me - maybe soon, maybe later.  But I could  get  hit by a car or struck by lightning or killed in a random shooting first.  It's not something I worry about all the time because worrying about dying  interferes with  my mind and keeps me from living as full a life as I can for as long as I can.  Which is all any of us can do, with or without cancer.  The treatments we go through to manage  our disease are no fun, admittedly.  But when I read about  the treatments, surgeries,  setbacks others have gone through, then see them post about their  good news and the hope  they project it gives me hope, too and I'm very  grateful to them for sharing. And maybe that's the secret- as more stage 4  survivors share their stories,  more people wil learn, and as they learn, the fear and the stigma will fall away.

Grace- lizard44

danker
Posts: 1279
Joined: Apr 2012

Just assume all will be well! Then when NED comes, you tell yourself,"see, I didn't need the anxiety'cause I knew all would be well."

beaumontdave's picture
beaumontdave
Posts: 1130
Joined: Aug 2013

I want to run with your point-of-view, Danker, but it's like the Star Trek episode where Spock, Kirk, Bones, and Scotty are stuck in an old west scenerio, as the Clantons, doomed to be shot down by the Earps and Doc Holliday at the OK corral. Spock realizes the bullets aren't real and can't hurt him, but the humans, like us, can't have the slightest doubt, or they will be killed. If you didn't watch Star Trek back then, it's just my way of saying, it's hard not to give in to fear and worst case scenarios when pondering your future, especially when thinking about those who depend on you. But, you're right that all the fear and anxiety is wasted energy if it turns out well [or if you get hit by a truck at some future point]. Anyway, I'll work on it...........................................Dave

Trubrit's picture
Trubrit
Posts: 5416
Joined: Jan 2013

None of us get out alive. 

I use the staging to suit my needs. 

I tell people I'm stage IV and watch the amazment in their faces, because there is still the belief that you're dying when you are stage IV and I want to prove them wrong. OK, I might be dying next month, but this month I'm not and I feel good and I want them to know it; so that one day, when they are diagnosed or their child or loved one, they will think 'Stage IV doesn't mean an instant death sentence'.

Oh sure, I do get a kick out of seeing the amazment, because really, I'm quite special  , but for the most part its because I want them to know its not all bad. To give hope when hope has faded. To try to impress upon people that they should live life with joy. 

Yeah, I'm full of it. 

Sue - Trubrit

beaumontdave's picture
beaumontdave
Posts: 1130
Joined: Aug 2013

I'm with you, I want to be able to say I beat this when it was really bad, stage 4, because that would be a great example to other victims of this stuff, that there is hope. If it doesn't play out that way, the labels won't matter much anyway......................................Dave

JanJan63's picture
JanJan63
Posts: 2482
Joined: Sep 2014

You guys are all so wise. I like you're thinking Sue. I want to give people hope. But I also don't want them thinking that they don't need to seek out early detection because of it. I am reminded of the meme that goes around on Facebook with Charlie brown sitting with Snoopy and Charlie Brown says 'someday we'll all die' and Snoopy responds 'yes, but on all other days we will live'.

Subscribe to Comments for "Does your grade change?"