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NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1072
Joined: Feb 2015

Not even sure what to ask or say.  This is happening very quickly, just diagnosed out of the blue.  Surgery coming up shortly, the whole thing will be less than 6 weeks.  Right now just concerned about the surgery and recovery time, with finders crossed that it is not too far.  

John212's picture
John212
Posts: 116
Joined: Jan 2015

Welcome. You'll find that this place is home to dozens of really cool, very supportive people. Most of us have been through at least some of what you will be experiencing so the availability of experienced advice is great here.

Do you have any specific questions about your surgery? If so, do you know at this point what form the surgery will take? This will help those with similar experience reply to your questions.

 

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1072
Joined: Feb 2015

Ascending Colon resection.  Hopefully the lymph nodes are clean, but some scans indicate activity in a couple (or more).  At this point was told no chemo before surgery, which was a bit of a break along this whirlwind :)  Guess I am concerned about pain, and figure it is really going to stink for a few days.

It is happening so fast, that part of me thinks it is not real.  From what I have read and heard from people at the hospital, it is normal feelings.  But all of this is really quite new.  :)  Trying to keep laughing and figure I will start acclimating.  Had opinions from a couple of surgeons, though of course part of me always thinks "Hey maybe a vitamin or something will knock this out and I do not need surgery, hold off a bit."

 

 But of course I know better than that and do try to assess the good stuff.  The Docs think I should be okay, generally good prognosis.  Maybe I can even miss chemo afterwards.  They do not know for sure, but it looks like Stage II or III.  Will know more after the surgery.  Plus I am in NY area and have SK, figure they know what they are doing, and so far everyone I have met there have been incredibily supportive and kind.  

 

Thanks for the welcome, and sorry for a bit disjointed train of thought on my end. :)

maglets's picture
maglets
Posts: 2589
Joined: Jun 2006

Dearest New here......disjointed train of thought!!!  haha you are the model of reason considering what you have just learned.  I am very glad you came here to this forum.....it is a great place filled with lots of great experienced people.

So just very briefly.....I always think the beginning is one of the hardest times....so much to absorb and as you already have found....the wonder the disbelief of it all.  No advice from me today....one step....baby step...glad you are booked for surgery....that always gets the ball rolling so to speak. So today Welcome and we will be anxious to learn more about you. When is your surgery?

maggie

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1072
Joined: Feb 2015

Thanks, I am trying to reason this all, but I am guessing I telling people here what they already know, reason does not quite fit 100%

The beginning probably is the hardest because of all the unknowns.  I had a bit of it from the first call from the doc "Hey, we see something. You should go for a test."  To the call almost immediately after the next test "Call me, now"  Whoops.  Then waiting for the biopsy results from the next thing after call me now.

From the time of the first "Call Me now" to the surgery will be under a month.  Seems to be a 6 cm or so area, and the say colon cancer moves relatively slowly, but it would seem to be best to do this ASAP.  Sort of having pre-seperation anxiety, coupled with "Oh man the pain is gonna suck for a bit." :)

Surgery is next week.  Right now just trying to get all last minute things done, pieces of business cleared away and some of the "Worst case things."  Still really have not told people.  So weird about calling friends and family and say "Hey, what's up, guess what," and there is part of me who thinks, couple of days in the hospital (well 3-5 it sounds like), some time crashed out in front of the TV and I will be back and about.  Did tell a ciouple of friends so far, just so they know and can be there to help my wife if she needs it.  

The one thing that has been pretty obvious so far is that the support is there via the hospital and otherwise, which is why I got on this site. (Actually tried about 4 days ago, but email was not coming through, so tried with a new email today.)

 

 

John212's picture
John212
Posts: 116
Joined: Jan 2015

Like you, I hesitated to put out the word that I had been diagnosed with CRC. It took a while, but my wife finally convinced me to put something up on Facebook, which meant that just about everyone I knew would find out in one post. I was completely shocked at how many messages of support I got - even from people that I rarely ever "talked with" via social media. I found out about a few friends who had had similar diagnoses in the past, or who had fought other cancers, so now we have this other thing in common, too.

I vote for telling the world. Now's the time to reap some of the benefits of friendship that you've given to others in the past.

 

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1072
Joined: Feb 2015

I started with a couple of friends and my brother.  Usually I keep things close to the vest and do not want to impose.  I am there for all my friends and I know they will be there for me...there are times where they want to smack me when I get around to telling them things after awhile.  

I have a couple of good friends who I 'met" through the years via social media (and have met in real life subsequent to that), and started with them.  Then a couple more.  Some things going on (other family members are ill) and I am trying to shield them also.  

But I have been moving towards your suggestion.  Just taking time to get there.  Hey, maybe I will postpone the surgery a bit and can work out my telling people issues Laughing  Okay, not really on the postpone part. 

 

Being able to speak with people here is a great thing, sort of the same club.  I felt like that in the areas for testing - had to drink whatever they gave you and looked around to see who else was drinking.

John212's picture
John212
Posts: 116
Joined: Jan 2015

I definitely get the going slowly impulse. In fact, when I did get around to posting about my diagnosis on Facebook, I said that I'd been invited by the hospital to do a several-days long review of their food service. As I'm one of those insufferable people who likes to post photographs of interesting meals, it was a jokey way to open up the subject. A couple days later, I posted a pic of one of my hospital meals, though I still wish I'd posted a picture of my IV bag and called it "dinner."

Lovekitties's picture
Lovekitties
Posts: 3323
Joined: Jan 2010

The beginning of this journey is always most difficult not only trying to wrap your thoughts around the diagnosis but also figuring out where to go from here.

Some of our members have/continue to be treated at Sloan and have had good things to say about them

When is your surgery?  Do you know specifically what the surgical plan is?

Hang with us, ask whatever you want and use us for your sounding board or weeping wall, whatever you need.  Folks here are super supportive and have had a world of experience in fighting this disease.

Wishing you the best,

Marie who loves kitties

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1072
Joined: Feb 2015

As far as I know the plan is to remove the asecending colon and re-route the section out, plus grab lymph nodes to check things out.  They figure the surgery is about 3 hours.  The worst part will be getting me in there and getting the IV in to knock me out. ;)  

I have been impressed with Sloan so far, but the reputation does precede them.  When I first heard the news, my first thought was "Sloan"  I checked elsewhere, but they are the best there is as far as I know in this area and my understanding you would be hard pressed to find better, though there are equals, but I am fortunate to be close to them.  I temper it with am I trying to convince myself, but I do not think it is that.

BTW, I am big animal fan and anyone who loves animals is okay dokey in my book.  :)

abrub's picture
abrub
Posts: 2088
Joined: Mar 2010

My surgeon there is Dr. Paty, and I adore him.  He is very meticulous in removing only what needs to be removed; no random organ removal.  I lost part of my sigmoid colon and part of my rt. colon, as I had metastatic appendix cancer that had seeded all over the place.  Care was excellent, but try to have someone in the hospital with you whenever possible.  Sometimes nursing is not as responsive as we'd like, and having a personal advocate really helps.  Feel free to send me a personal message with any questions you may have.  

(Oh, and I'm also an animal lover - grew up on a small farm, and now actively watching birds as I look out to the lake.)

Alice

Metastatic Mucinous Appendix Cancer  dx'd 4/2007

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1072
Joined: Feb 2015

Sorry for the delay, did not see rplies (getting used to the board format.)

Surgery is scheduled tomorrow, this moved fast (from discovery to surgery).  

I am now hoping to get good pathology report in the next few days.

RickMurtagh's picture
RickMurtagh
Posts: 584
Joined: Feb 2010

I am with Alice - Dr. Paty is the best and saved my life.  The pain management team at SK is great too.  They have a cool room (I forget what it was called) that you can meet visitors in, if people find out and come to visit you while you are in the hospital.  The advantage of using the social center (rec room, or whatevert eh heck it is called) is that you can have more than two visitors at a time in there.  Having more people and all at once made talking about it all easier for me.  It did not help with "breaking the ice" like in your situaltion, but it may help.

Alice is right about the nurses too.  Having someone there to be a personal advocates really help. Mine was a good friend, 6'6" inches tall and did not like taking no for and answer.

The night time nurse was great.  I think she was hitting on me, but then I was high on fentyl, so perhaps not.

Start walking as soon as possible!  It will help cut down on the number of days for your stay.

peace and best wishes,

Rick

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1072
Joined: Feb 2015

I did not have Dr. Paty, but someone else in the department.  The entire team was amazing, each person who spoke to me every step along the way were real caring and concerned.  The nurses was also very good, though I seemed to be there during the time where shifts and schedules changed so that except for one night nurse, who was with me three nights in a row, I had different nurses.  Each was great.

The pain was remarkably a non-issue for the most part.  The first day I hit the pain button more out of fear, the second day stopped doing so.  There were spasms the third and fourth day which were the biggest "issue" but Ativan seemed to stop it.  Got out in four days (making sure to walk like everyone said here, amazing advice for sure) and now resting at home.  Had some spasms two days ago, but otherwise fine.  Yesterday was really tired and slept a lot, the most in a long time.  Probably 18 hours I guess in 24 hours.  Figure I am healing and my body trying to get back to normal and just needed some rest.

Next week is the first follow-up and also will be starting plans for chemo.

danker's picture
danker
Posts: 1179
Joined: Apr 2012

The hospital stay for your upcomming operation is only a few days.  They manage your pain and tell you to walk as much as you can.

The walking will  hurry the recovery.  Good Luck  Don't be afraid!!

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1072
Joined: Feb 2015

The other day some anxiousness set in, maybe a bit of fear :)  THey said I will have a morphine drip, so I am bringing some music, New Age and Pink Floyd, to go with it ;)

 

They mentioend they want me up and walking ASAP.  They think I may actually be able to go home by Saturday in time for Vaeltine's Day.

ron50's picture
ron50
Posts: 1720
Joined: Nov 2001

With the operation and ongoing treatments. I ve been here so long I have forgotten what most of that was like. Wishing you well Ron.

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1072
Joined: Feb 2015

I am hoping that this will quickly be a memory, like broken bones I have had, though I am now officially part of this (Cancer) and will be here to help others through this, the posts from you and others are amazingly helpful in terms of support.

lp1964's picture
lp1964
Posts: 1237
Joined: Jun 2013

Yes, you are going through one of the toughest part of your treatment. Sounds pretty routine so far. Don't be afraid of the surgery. It's gonna be a great feeling to have the cancer out of your body. 

It is recomended to take at least 400mg Cimetidine/Tagamet  (over the counter) twice a day starting 1 week before the surgery and continue for at least 2 weeks after. By some medical literature this may reduce the risk of the cancer spreading during surgery. I and many other people here took it and believe it may help. But definitely tell your doctor if you decided to try. 

All the best for you,

Laz

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1072
Joined: Feb 2015

I did not have time before surgery (tomoworrow) to try your suggestion but will speak with the Doctor.  It seems Sloan is pretty good about adjunct therapy.  Will need to write this down (just did write it down in fact.)  WIll ask sometime in the next couple of days, or ask my wife to ask since I may be a bit out of it tomorrow.

tootsie1's picture
tootsie1
Posts: 5056
Joined: Feb 2008

Welcome! Sorry you're having a reason to be here, but we will help if we can.

 

*hugs*

Gail

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1072
Joined: Feb 2015

I am sorry to be here also, but everyone has been great.  Not a club I wanted to be a part of, but in terms of a good thing in all this is what I have found on this board.

pilarica's picture
pilarica
Posts: 44
Joined: Oct 2014

Hello !!! I had a similar surgery January 2nd. 2015........ They removed a tumor the size of a grapefruit from my sigmoid colon and were able to re-connect me. This was done at UPENN. 

It does hurt but they give you medicine to control pain, you need to really start walking as soon as they tell you even if it hurts, walking helps healing and also helps getting things working properly inside. I was in the hospital for 5 days. So I had the surgery 5 weeks ago and I am doing my normal life (well if ther is anything normal ha,ha,ha)....... 

I wish you all the best and have faith that things will go well, positive thinking...........

xoxo

Pilar

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1072
Joined: Feb 2015

The pain is a concern, but will have the morphine. :)  The catheter is making me wince a bit ;)

 

Glad you are recovering well, and will be here 5 weeks from now doing the same everyone here has done for me - support and hope.

Easyflip's picture
Easyflip
Posts: 588
Joined: May 2013

2 years ago. It's scary as heck because there's so much unknown. You're in good hands at Sloan, trust what they say and follow their advice. I did the Tagamet thing, I figured it couldn't hurt. There is some pain with the surgery but it's manageable, mine was laporoscopic and the doc gave me the morphine pump right after. Start walking and you'll heal faster. Every stage is curable! Allow yourself a little freak out if you're a III or IV but don't stay there! Get busy with getting better! Breathe a huge sigh of relief if you're a I or a II, it's still cancer but caught early and very treatable. I suggest telling everyone you know, I personally am responsible for 9 friends getting colonoscopies. This disease needs public awareness and education, plus the support you will get helps with your survival. That's right, there's an emotional/spiritual/psychological component to your healing. Your staging will determine your chemo, that's where this board really helps because we've all done it. I love my doctors and nurses but frankly they just don't know what it's like because they've only read and heard about it second hand. Touch base with us after you've had your surgery, we're all pulling for you and wish you the best of luck, go get 'em friend! You can do this!

Easyflip/Richard

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1072
Joined: Feb 2015

Really good advice, I have not quite hit freak out yet, moving too fast and not an official staging yet.  It looks like it is going to be Stage II or III in all liklihood.  

On th eve of surgery, I am beginning to question whether I need surgery or should just find some magic potion.  (I do know better than that, but my mind is tricking me.  The logical part is saying I am near the best place in the world for what I have.)  Sort of cold feet like :)

I have been letting my friends know make sure to get checked, and I as I get used to this more, will open my mouth more. As to the emotional/spirtiual/psychological component, it makes total sense.  Being able to help others is important.  I do certain things already along those lines and even on a bad day helping makes it better.  Yes, the books and training is different than being in it.  

I am guessing I will be out of recovery maybe 6:00PM tomorrow.  Not sure "how out of it" I will be, but will get back here ASAP to at least say a quick hello.

 

Fight for my love
Posts: 1530
Joined: Jun 2009

Best luck with surgery and have a speedy recovery.

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1072
Joined: Feb 2015

Will get back here as soon as I can to let people to know how it went

Buddy2013
Posts: 17
Joined: Nov 2013

So sorry you find yourself in this situation.   SK has an excellent reputation.

Life Extension Foundation (LEF) web site has several articles under their 'Health Topics' which contain useful information for  Colon Cancer, Cancer Surgery, Cancer Adjuvant Therapy, etc.  I learned of it from another board member here when I was first diagnosed (stage IV).   

If you decide to have chemo, there are supplements you can take that may help the chemo work better. LEF articles describe those.

Here is the link.  http://www.lef.org/Protocols

I agree with the other board members on Tagamet to reduce 'seeding' possibility and walking early and often after surgery. 

Beating Cancer with Nutrition by Patrick Quillan was the first book I read after diagnosis.    Highly recommend to everyone, even folks without cancer.

Best of luck and blessings to you.

 

 

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1072
Joined: Feb 2015

Bookmarked the webage and grabbed the book for my iPad.  Bringing some movies, books, audio books, photos of beaches, moutnains, family and friends to have rotate, plus some Pink Floyd for the morphine trip. ;)

Passed the information onto my wife to make sure to check with the doc. 

Trubrit's picture
Trubrit
Posts: 4784
Joined: Jan 2013

Sounds like you have it all laid out and ready for your surgery.  You will do well, with a good attitude and motivation you can't lose. 

Keep us posted. 

Sue - Trubrit

jen2012
Posts: 1607
Joined: Aug 2012

Good luck with the surgery...it will be fine. You will be up and about in no time.  we will all be thinking of you and/or praying for you Tomorrow!

tanstaafl's picture
tanstaafl
Posts: 1292
Joined: Oct 2010

 ....whole thing will be less than 6 weeks.

Not sure whether you have colon or rectal cancer, but there are some differences to be considered.   The more of your story details that you can tell, the better people can help you.  Here, and other sites, you can get pointed toward first class and world class treatments that average doctors miss. Perhaps save yourself some serious money and misery.

Beyond serum CEA...

It's a long story but we found we could  help our future selves with these blood tests before surgery (and before neoadjuvant treatments like chemo and radiation before first surgery), with several of them repeated after surgery:  CA19-9, CA72-4, TPS, LDH, hsCRP, ESR, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3.  You can, too. It's a small investment that can add years  and/or save many (10s/100s of) thousands of dollars.    A lot of average doctors are not familiar with why on some of these tests, they're behind the curve.  You can fix that later, but you can't travel back in time for a redo. 

Don't panic, ask questions, insist on choices and superior performances. With cancer, price is often a poor indicator of relative performance. At this point, starting sooner, even grim situations can be radically improved by starting with some of the suggestions here. 

 

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1072
Joined: Feb 2015

Just saw the new messages, heading out now, but it is Colon Cancer (Ascending Colon/Cecum)

annalexandria's picture
annalexandria
Posts: 2573
Joined: Oct 2011

and everything was as expected.  Not sure if anyone mentioned this, but along with walking, chewing gum can help with getting one's digestive system back on track.  This part of the process usually seems to be a bit of a challenge for most of us post-surgery.  Good luck, and keep us posted!

Hugs~AA

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1072
Joined: Feb 2015

Someone in the hospital also mentioned the gum thing, I am now chewing to get things going properly :)  

The whole surgry went overall well (posted some details) and I think fear/anxious/the unknown was as big an issue.  The advice here helped so much, and looks like I am embarking on chemo shortly.  Not sure how soon that will start, whether there is a time period after surgery or they go ASAP.  Will find out next week when I meet with them.

Kimber8920's picture
Kimber8920
Posts: 6
Joined: Feb 2015

I know how you feel... I was diagnosed back in nov 2014 after I was  rushed into emergency surgery to save my life... it was a bowel obstruction..tumor.. stage 3 colon cancer... its scary and they have told me that its too far gone for the chemo to get rid of it and that it would only make the reconnect more difficult ..so I opted to do no chemo and no radiation... they say I will just be under surveillance for the next 5 years..colonoscopys and cat and pet scans every 3 months ...  its a scary time and when my fiance walked out because be could not handle me having this that made it even harder but I am pushing on and taking each day moment by moment...Good luck to you

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1072
Joined: Feb 2015

Sorry to hear about your situation, including about your fiance.  There are many people who will be around to help and care, so try to focus on that.  I just look at how people here have been to me and it helps.

I was just told Stage III about an hour ago.  No radiation, but looks like 6 months of chemo.  It seems to be the proper course for me based on what they found - seems they got everything but there are lymph nodes involved.  

One of the terms I picked up on is NED here.  You and I will be looking forward to the next 5 years of NED reports.  In November 2019 the cheer will be for you and in February 2020 it will be for me :)

This whole waiting game and retests though really seems to add some stress to this all ;)

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1072
Joined: Feb 2015

First off, I apologize for not posting sooner, did not quite have as much "get up and go" as I thought I would.  Second, I will go back and try to post to posts I missed  (If there is a preference I missed  for how posts are ordered, that would be great.  It seems to be threaded and I am not seeing an option to flat view by time and date).  I am sure what follows will be familiar to those who have been down this road. 

Anyway, the surgery happened Tuesday afternoon.   The whole time leaving up to the surgery was really tough, I just wanted to run out of  there, my head knew better but I just wanted to run.  I figured if I ran out in the hospital gown, worse comes to worse NYPD would pick me up and send me for a psych evaluation, which sounded like a better option ;)  

Afterwards the surgeon said "Pretty much what we thought going in," with a couple of minor wrinkles but nothing earth shattering.  It seems to have been a golf ball size tumor, give or take, and right now I am in the waiting game for the pathology report on lymph nodes and the rest.  The lymph nodes appeared inflamed by a visual (and what the pre OP scans indicated), but will not know for sure until the things come back.  

I was really out of it coming out of the general, and vaguely remember pain, but sort of a distant memory.  Was in recovery for about 5 hours.  The sliver of ice I was able to have was amazing, and that became a recurring theme during the next couple of days :)  The little bits allowed were tremendous.  My wife said I was treating the sponge on the sticks like gold and it was funny to see me daintily wet my lips :)

There was no real pain, the first day I hit the pain button often, more from the fear of pain as compared to actual pain.  It was more discomfort, though coughing, sneezing etc could cause some spikes.  Spasms started the second day, but gave me some meds for that.

The next day they started me walking, which I was prepared for based on what everyone said here.  And the first "trip" was tough.  I had to stop every 4 feet. Did not think I could make a "lap,"  but the nurse was great and what everyone said here to me kept on repeating in my mind.  Walking = Healing.  By the end of the day I did a total of 3 laps I think, and was able to do the last one non-stop.

Upped the laps and it came together quickly, by the end of the second day I was going 3 laps at a time.  By the third day, I was talking to some other patients (if they looked like they could use a word or talk) to let them know it really does get better and I was barely two days out.

Did have some bleeding during surgery, so needed to get a couple of units of blood about day 3 based on tests and other things.  

Got home yesterday and slept really well, no IVs and not having BP and temperture taken every few hours helps :)  Thought I had more energy than I actually do, so a couple of hours of catching up on emails and the rest did take a bit out of me.  Just got to go with sitting and watching TV, and doing laps and breathing exercises every commercial.

The doctors and nurses were great, really caring and willing to talk about anything.

Once again, thanks to all.  The words prior to the surgery really helped a lot and I thought of them often and I am sure helped to get me home quicker in terms of focusing on the walking and other items.

 
Trubrit's picture
Trubrit
Posts: 4784
Joined: Jan 2013

So good to hear from you and know that all went welll with the surgery. Especially glad to hear that you are home, as there is no better place for recovery, and no better place to sleep than your own bed. 

It sounds like you did everything you were supposed to do. The walking really is a blessing. 

I hope your pathology comes back soon. I got mine the second day after surgery, so it was really quick. 

Once path comes back, you will know what your next steps are going to be. 

We will take this journey with you, and look forward to helping in any way we can. 

Be good to yourself. Don't over-do it. 

Sue - Trubrit

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1072
Joined: Feb 2015

I have fallen into the don't over do it trap :)  The tired is a little sneaky, expecially after the first night back home and some real sleep.  Caught up on emails and couple "taxing" things like reading.  Then got tired.  Not flat out on back, but really just wanted to sit on on couch and watch TV.

Path back an hour ago - Stage III.  Details of further treatment will come next week.

John212's picture
John212
Posts: 116
Joined: Jan 2015

Good for you. Those first few days after surgery are tough, but my recollection is that most of the difficulty was about being tired and weak rather than pain. Though, about that pain. The last thing the nurse did before clearing out the whole crew that was getting me settled was to ask if I wanted "the button" - that button you could push for a little extra hit of narcotics just in case. Hey, I'm a child of the 60s. What could possibly go wrong? I hit it over and over again, more in anticipation of pain than due to any real pain. By midnight or so, I was so stoned the nurse and technician who came in to get vitals and such left with eyes the size of saucers. I must have been a tad rude. Laughing

Glad to hear that you made it through and are home resting. I found that Netflix became my best friend. I started searching for the dumbest old comedies I could find and laughed my way through recovery for weeks. Rest, drink plenty of water, and find a few laughs.

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1072
Joined: Feb 2015

The first day was fear of pain more than actual pain in my case also, great minds Smile They had limits on how much and how often, so could not get a good buzz on Cool  

I do need to schedule some binge watching on NetFlix.  There were a couple of TV series through the years I started to watch, but somehow dropped off due to when they were on, committment to a running story line and other things.  The Shield, The Wire and 24 are three off the top of my head I should add to the list.  As to dumb old comedies, they rock.  I will use the old stand-bys, Airplane, The Naked Gun series and some others (not that I consider them dumb, they are indeed works of art), but then will head into the really good bad stuff.  

Any suggestions?

John212's picture
John212
Posts: 116
Joined: Jan 2015

I have watched hundred of movies in the course of being a life-long movie lover. When I started looking for comedies to watch during my recovery and treatment time,  I fell into the "I've already seen that three times" trap so I decided to ask friends and family for suggestions and agreed to watch their suggestions regardless of how many times I'd seen the film. And, I actually kept a list, but it's nearly 50 titles long and will make this post run the length of a whole page.

Does anyone know how to create a tight list in a post on this board? What would make the most sense would be a two column table. Is that possible?

Trubrit's picture
Trubrit
Posts: 4784
Joined: Jan 2013

You could send a personal message to New Here, but then the rest of us would miss out on it. 

Not much help, but an idea. 

Sue - Trubrit

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1072
Joined: Feb 2015

Just found out Stage III, looks like 6 Months of chemo coming up.  Will get more details next week when I meet with doc.

 

Trubrit's picture
Trubrit
Posts: 4784
Joined: Jan 2013

You need to ask if it is Stage III A B or C.  

Stage III is better than Stage IV, so good news (if you can call anything about Cancer good).

Happy to hear that you are not going to do Radiation. That for me, was the worst part (by a million). 

Good (bad) comedies? Monty Python comes to mind, especially The Holy Grail; as does Galaxy Quest. Try Red Dwarf on Netflix. My boys love them. 

You have a great, upbeat attitude. That goes a long, long way with Cancer. 

Now you need to post an avatar, maybe even a picture and let us 'meet' you in person (almost).  - OK, you don't 'have' to. Its just a suggestion -

Sue - Trubrit

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1072
Joined: Feb 2015

They did a quick look as a courtesy to me when I was making an appointment for a follow-up (meaning I sort of put them on the spot and check to see if any news :))  They could not review enough for the detail of which Stage III it was right then, which is fine.  It was more to get me in the ballpark and mentally ready.  I knew instantly based on the tumor growth and where it penertrated and also the number of lymph nodes involved.  We will go over it in more detail when I have my visit next week.  Sounds like B or C.

I also asked for general overview and looks to be 6 months of chemo.  Again I asked them to get general overview of where I am going and details will follow next week.  (In other words each question I asked was "Not to hold you to this, but can you get me in the ballpark")

The Holy Grail and Life Of Brian are on my iPhone and iPads.  PYTHON RULES!!! (Much to my wife's chagrin sometimes ;))

I have moments where it is kind of dark, but I am trying to be as up about things as I can.  There were a couple of times where there was pain in the hospital or constant sticks to try to find veins since I was dehydrated where I thought "&(&((**, this is $^$^&&^###," but then got out of there and tried to make my jokes.  Making the Docs and nurses laugh, and encouraging other patients where it seemed appropriate, was a better place to be.

Still trying to get things squared in my head about all this and how to "meet" with things.  But one of the things is the last few years have been bad with various things, and we just keep laughing and shaking our heads.  Not to say there are not down moments, but we are getting through.  Though something like this does jump to the top of the S--t list by definition, it has had some competition and that competition has taken some of the edge off this  or makes it just another thing we have to get through.

We will see what tune I am singing in a few months, but with the help here I am confident it will all be good.

 

 

 

 

skeets1961
Posts: 56
Joined: Dec 2014

Hi NEWHERE, i just wanted to tell you what my husband's experience was for when he started chemo.  He had major surgery (partial colon removed and a colostomy bag) which ended up getting infected in the hospital.  The surgeon didn't send him to the oncologist to start chemo until he was completely healed from the surgery.  He even had to eventually get the wound vac which was a Godsend as it heals wounds 60% faster.  THe surgeon said starting chemo too early would hinder his healing.  Not sure if all dr's would agree but i was certainly glad they waited even though it was 2 months from surgery to chemo.  Glad you got some reassurance from the others here on the board before your surgery.  It really helps to hear others' experience and advice.  Take care and hoping your healing is fast.

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1072
Joined: Feb 2015

I forgot to ask when it would start, so really appreciate the information about the 2 months.  Was guessing there will be some healing time before they start, but not sure.  And I did not want to call the Drs offices everytime some question crosses my mind.  LOL.  I got the general lay of the land on the phone call yesterday and will fill in some blanks next week, so all the information here is greatly appreciated.  It helps get me in the general mindset.  I am generally planning now that I will be out of chemo around mid October.  There was a trip we were thinking of, until three weeks ago, dooing in June for a few days with family to celebrate an anniversary, but that is on hold.

BUT come November or December, ROAD TRIP!!!

Trubrit's picture
Trubrit
Posts: 4784
Joined: Jan 2013

If you can still go on your family trip at the last moment, I wouldn't rule it out quite yet. One never knows just how the chemo is going to hit you. I've seen people here who continue to work, or travel, during chemo. Didn't happen for me, but could happen for you. 

I can tell you right now, planning trips does not get any better after treatment is over.  It took three post treatment visits with my Onc before he would clear me to go home (England), last year. Even though my scans were looking good, he wanted just one more. Its always just one more. 

My husband and I are planning a trip to the Oregon coast in May. Already I'm wondering what my April test results will be like. May or may not get to go on that trip, but we're planning it, never-the-less. 

Its everones wish, along with you, that you make it through the chemo with flying colours. I hope you get your family trip in June. I hope your road trip  is a blast at the end of the year. 

Take good care of yourself during this healing stage. I remember I just wanted to get started with the chemo and get better. 

Have they mentioned you getting a port? 

Sue - Trubrit

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