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Article from NCI on chromophobe RCC:

sblairc's picture
sblairc
Posts: 586
Joined: Feb 2014

It would seem this is very positive progress into understanding chromophobe RCC. 

 

 

http://www.cancer.gov/newscenter/newsfromnci/2014/TCGAkidneyChromophobe?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+ncinewsreleases+%28NCI+News+Releases%29

gingersnaps
Posts: 67
Joined: Jul 2013

Could you please make the link so I can find it. I am on a kindle and can't copy.  Thank you.  Very interested.

 

sblairc's picture
sblairc
Posts: 586
Joined: Feb 2014

Researchers in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Network have made a number of new findings about the biology and development of a rare form of kidney cancer. They found that the disease – chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (ChRCC) – stems in part from alterations in genes in the mitochondria, the cell’s energy supplier. They also discovered that the tumor is characterized by genetic rearrangements near a gene important in DNA repair and in maintaining telomerase, the enzyme which determines a cell’s lifespan. Finally, investigators also found that ChRCC is a distinct disease and shares few genomic characteristics with other kidney cancers.

In the study – the most extensive genomic view of ChRCC to date – investigators led by Chad Creighton, Ph.D., Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, and Kimryn Rathmell, M.D., Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, performed a complex array of analyses, including examining the entire genomes of 50 of the 66 ChRCC tumors studied, a high number for a rare cancer. The study revealed increased numbers of mitochondria as well as mutations in mitochondrial DNA. This led researchers to discover that ChRCC tumors favor a different energy-generating process than that used by the more common clear cell kidney cancer. In addition, their findings are the first to show specific alterations affecting the TERT gene that could affect cancer development, and might help explain its increased expression – and deregulation – in cancer. Overall, the findings provide new insights into the development of more common forms of kidney cancer, and shed light on the role of mitochondria and metabolic pathways in cancer. The results also support the growing realization that both the cancer’s genomic characteristics and cell of origin matter, as many cancers consist of several individual diseases that require specific therapies. TCGA is a collaboration jointly supported and managed by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), both parts of the National Institutes of Health. The researchers reported their results online August 21, 2014 in Cancer Cell.

I am alive
Posts: 316
Joined: Jul 2012

Thanks for the heads up on this. So little is out there on chromophobe. It's encouraging to know that Big Brains are looking deeply into it. Hope this hard-won bit of knowledge leads to something wonderful for us not too far down the road. I see your husband was diagnosed with chRCC back in February. In a couple of months I will be 10 years past  diagnosis. I hope that gives you faith in the future. While things have been rocky at times, I can't complain. Life is good. (it's amazing what we can acclimate ourselves to.) Wishing you and your husband the best......

NanoSecond's picture
NanoSecond
Posts: 653
Joined: Oct 2012

Great find!  I hope you don't mind I have reposted the link to the PR (and a link to the actual study) on SmartPatients.

This explains why Afinitor is working (so far) to stop the progression of my liver mets whereas Sutent, Inlyta, and Cabozantinib all failed me.

Thanks again,

 

-Neil

sblairc's picture
sblairc
Posts: 586
Joined: Feb 2014

I am glad this was helpful. I picked it up linked from the Kidney Cancer Association Facebook page (if you are on Facebook) this page picks up almost every article and piece of internet tidbit related to Kidney Cancer. Lots of it is human interest, some of it political, but I check it periodically and find useful information occasionally. I "unliked" it because it was sort of overwhelming with stuff, but check in on it every now and then. 

 

Have a great weekend. 

NanoSecond's picture
NanoSecond
Posts: 653
Joined: Oct 2012

This details extremely important research for us "Chromies".  I just wish I could read the actual paper.  Here is what I posted on SmartPatients (for those not registered there):

The research suggests that metabolic inhibitors (most of which are still in development) might be more likely to work than targeted anti-angiogenic drugs.

According to the Afinitor website, one of the 3 things that this drug does is "Decrease the activity of nutrient transporters and the uptake of nutrients involved in cell metabolism". This, more than its inhibition of angiogenesis, may be why it is effective for chromophobe:

http://www.afinitor.com/advanced-renal-cell-carcinoma/hcp/biology.jsp?usertrack.filter_applied=true&NovaId=4029462118440234311

Similarly, Metformin may also be somewhat effective for similar reasons.

Basically, chromophobe RCC has virtually nothing in common with clear-cell RCC. Yet it is the clear-cell "proven" targeted therapies that are first used to control it.

sblairc's picture
sblairc
Posts: 586
Joined: Feb 2014

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1535610814003043

 

I think you can purchase it here.

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