Silly question...

T1ffanyz
T1ffanyz Member Posts: 41

My surgery was a month ago, incision healed, can I go swimming?

«1

Comments

  • icemantoo
    icemantoo Member Posts: 3,359 Member
    Swimming

    Tiffany.

    Yes and no.

    If swimming means wading in a pool for 10 or 15 mintues the answer is yes, If it means more than a 25 yard lap training for the ironman the Answer is no. For the next few months treat it like walking, if it becomes painful, stop.

     

    It sort of reminds me of my wife crashing the waves at a remote beach in the B.V. I. a couple of years ago on one of our Caribbean cruises. I was talking with a fellow about his big boat when my wife comes over in obvious pain after a hard fall from one of the waves and complaining she had broken her arm. The boat guy says I really shoudn't say anything, but I am an Orthopedic Surgeon. After a quick checkup it was determined that there was nothing wrong. The moral of the story is make sure that you have medical assistance available if you get in over your head.

     

     

    Icemantoo

  • anmazon
    anmazon Member Posts: 144
    Oooh, I'm good at asking these.

    Maybe not so good at answering.

    My surgeon gave me permission to swim/soak/hot tub after five weeks. He was most adamant about not doing so prior to that time--it was my impression he was concerned about the potential for infection (water around here is notoriously bad), but I think the Iceman has a valid point about injuring yourself.

    I'm nine weeks out from my surgery, and got the okey-dokey to swim a month ago.  Of course, the irony is that I don't want to swim because I feel like I look like the Michelin Man (still really bloat-y).

    I'm sure your water is not a scrofulous as Albuquerque's, but I would err on the side of caution.

    Annie

  • MDCinSC
    MDCinSC Member Posts: 574
    anmazon said:

    Oooh, I'm good at asking these.

    Maybe not so good at answering.

    My surgeon gave me permission to swim/soak/hot tub after five weeks. He was most adamant about not doing so prior to that time--it was my impression he was concerned about the potential for infection (water around here is notoriously bad), but I think the Iceman has a valid point about injuring yourself.

    I'm nine weeks out from my surgery, and got the okey-dokey to swim a month ago.  Of course, the irony is that I don't want to swim because I feel like I look like the Michelin Man (still really bloat-y).

    I'm sure your water is not a scrofulous as Albuquerque's, but I would err on the side of caution.

    Annie

    Scrofulous?

    Hahahahaha!

    I've heard Albuquerque's (and all of New Mexico's) water (if you can indeed call it that) described in many terms over the years, but "scrofulous" is a new one!  Hahaha!

    Tiffany, Icemantoo has given great advice.  You have nothing to prove by being a superstar.  You are a superstar because you are kicking cancer's ****!  Take your time and enjoy your recovery.

    Swim!  But use your head!

     

  • anmazon
    anmazon Member Posts: 144
    MDCinSC said:

    Scrofulous?

    Hahahahaha!

    I've heard Albuquerque's (and all of New Mexico's) water (if you can indeed call it that) described in many terms over the years, but "scrofulous" is a new one!  Hahaha!

    Tiffany, Icemantoo has given great advice.  You have nothing to prove by being a superstar.  You are a superstar because you are kicking cancer's ****!  Take your time and enjoy your recovery.

    Swim!  But use your head!

     

    Scrofulous!

    Laughing

    C'mon, Michael, 

    You've lived here.  Admittedly, it's probably not the first adjective you think of, but it is apt.

    I think I'll go have a big glass of scrofulous tap water right now as a matter of fact.

    Annie

  • Djinnie
    Djinnie Member Posts: 945
    To swim or not to swim?

    Hi Tiffany, 

    I agree with the other posts, I started swimming again around five to six weeks, I say swimming it was something between breast stroke and doggie paddle, it was a little painful to start with. At first i was concerned about swimming out in the deep end because I would tire so easily. I enjoyed it though and i think it helped strengthen my stomach muscles. I have a little pouch left over from the operation, just over my right kidney, it is slowly dissapearing and I think that is down to regular swimming.

    Djinnie x

  • T1ffanyz
    T1ffanyz Member Posts: 41
    icemantoo said:

    Swimming

    Tiffany.

    Yes and no.

    If swimming means wading in a pool for 10 or 15 mintues the answer is yes, If it means more than a 25 yard lap training for the ironman the Answer is no. For the next few months treat it like walking, if it becomes painful, stop.

     

    It sort of reminds me of my wife crashing the waves at a remote beach in the B.V. I. a couple of years ago on one of our Caribbean cruises. I was talking with a fellow about his big boat when my wife comes over in obvious pain after a hard fall from one of the waves and complaining she had broken her arm. The boat guy says I really shoudn't say anything, but I am an Orthopedic Surgeon. After a quick checkup it was determined that there was nothing wrong. The moral of the story is make sure that you have medical assistance available if you get in over your head.

     

     

    Icemantoo

    Lol no ironman competitions

    I just want to get in the pool, walk around, and chill, nothing major, I'm at a resort and wasn't sure if it was ok.  Thanks for the info.  I'm thinking 15-20 minutes is all I can take in the sun.  

  • T1ffanyz
    T1ffanyz Member Posts: 41
    anmazon said:

    Oooh, I'm good at asking these.

    Maybe not so good at answering.

    My surgeon gave me permission to swim/soak/hot tub after five weeks. He was most adamant about not doing so prior to that time--it was my impression he was concerned about the potential for infection (water around here is notoriously bad), but I think the Iceman has a valid point about injuring yourself.

    I'm nine weeks out from my surgery, and got the okey-dokey to swim a month ago.  Of course, the irony is that I don't want to swim because I feel like I look like the Michelin Man (still really bloat-y).

    I'm sure your water is not a scrofulous as Albuquerque's, but I would err on the side of caution.

    Annie

    4 weeks

    I'm at 4 weeks, but I just want to walk around in poOl.  I have the bulge, I'm still swollen to the point where I haadd to wear a size up, but I need to be in the water at least once before my summer ends next week

  • T1ffanyz
    T1ffanyz Member Posts: 41
    Djinnie said:

    To swim or not to swim?

    Hi Tiffany, 

    I agree with the other posts, I started swimming again around five to six weeks, I say swimming it was something between breast stroke and doggie paddle, it was a little painful to start with. At first i was concerned about swimming out in the deep end because I would tire so easily. I enjoyed it though and i think it helped strengthen my stomach muscles. I have a little pouch left over from the operation, just over my right kidney, it is slowly dissapearing and I think that is down to regular swimming.

    Djinnie x

    Aqua therapy

    I was thinking of lookin into aqua therapy and see if it would help me loose this excess weight.  

    As for now I just want to walk around nothing major no real swimming I just want totally know its damage ttbrio in chlorine pool thanks for the advice. I hate my pouch!

  • T1ffanyz
    T1ffanyz Member Posts: 41
    MDCinSC said:

    Scrofulous?

    Hahahahaha!

    I've heard Albuquerque's (and all of New Mexico's) water (if you can indeed call it that) described in many terms over the years, but "scrofulous" is a new one!  Hahaha!

    Tiffany, Icemantoo has given great advice.  You have nothing to prove by being a superstar.  You are a superstar because you are kicking cancer's ****!  Take your time and enjoy your recovery.

    Swim!  But use your head!

     

    Thanks :)

    Thanks :)

  • Djinnie
    Djinnie Member Posts: 945
    T1ffanyz said:

    Aqua therapy

    I was thinking of lookin into aqua therapy and see if it would help me loose this excess weight.  

    As for now I just want to walk around nothing major no real swimming I just want totally know its damage ttbrio in chlorine pool thanks for the advice. I hate my pouch!

    Water Therapy

    Enjoy the water then while you have the chance:-)

  • MDCinSC
    MDCinSC Member Posts: 574
    anmazon said:

    Scrofulous!

    Laughing

    C'mon, Michael, 

    You've lived here.  Admittedly, it's probably not the first adjective you think of, but it is apt.

    I think I'll go have a big glass of scrofulous tap water right now as a matter of fact.

    Annie

    Have two!

    I'm buying! Tongue Out

    There is nothing in the world like a big glass of water that you can take a bite of!

  • anmazon
    anmazon Member Posts: 144
    MDCinSC said:

    Have two!

    I'm buying! Tongue Out

    There is nothing in the world like a big glass of water that you can take a bite of!

    so thick you can slice it!

    Who needs ice?

    Annie

  • Miashelle1
    Miashelle1 Member Posts: 44
    Djinnie said:

    Water Therapy

    Enjoy the water then while you have the chance:-)

    This thread makes me realise

    This thread makes me realise maybe I am trying to run before I can walk :)

  • MDCinSC
    MDCinSC Member Posts: 574

    This thread makes me realise

    This thread makes me realise maybe I am trying to run before I can walk :)

    GOOD!

    LOL AllI am saying is gauge what you do by how your body reacts to it!

    Believe me, it will let you know, IN SPADES, very quickly if you are pushing too hard.

    "The race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, . .  but to those who endure." (Paraphrased-Eccl. 9-11)

     

  • Texas_wedge
    Texas_wedge Member Posts: 2,798
    MDCinSC said:

    GOOD!

    LOL AllI am saying is gauge what you do by how your body reacts to it!

    Believe me, it will let you know, IN SPADES, very quickly if you are pushing too hard.

    "The race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, . .  but to those who endure." (Paraphrased-Eccl. 9-11)

     

    BAD!

    Unfortunately, Michael, that's very bad advice you're giving and liable to do some readers a lot of harm.  We've seen that proved many times here on this forum (though probably not dramatically during  the time in which you've been on board).

    Most certainly,  it's always a good idea to pay close attention to what your body is telling you, but it's a serious mistake to suppose that it will never play you false.   Long gone, for most of us, are the days when (if ever) we were finely tuned into our bodies' messages and could safely depend on them to direct our actions.   Your statement:

    "Believe me, it will let you know, IN SPADES, very quickly if you are pushing too hard."

    is very far from the truth.  We have a wide spectrum here in age, general physical condition and overall health, such that generalisations about what's best are almost always dangerous.

    Among our younger friends here we have quite a few endurance athletes, such as triathlon types, whose normal state is an enviable level of fitness and strength.  We have seen far too many from those ranks rely to their cost on the assumption you've made above.  They've come roaring back into their previous life-styles and done themselves a lot of damage before they've discovered their current limitations. 

    Troublesome hernias are one frequent consequence but, in general, setting back their recovery and healing processes, often by many months, has been a feature we've seen all too often. 

    SO!  don't rely on your body to tell you if you're overdoing it.  Take that essential exercise but, in the first few weeks and months, errr on the side of caution!!

     

  • GSRon
    GSRon Member Posts: 1,303

    BAD!

    Unfortunately, Michael, that's very bad advice you're giving and liable to do some readers a lot of harm.  We've seen that proved many times here on this forum (though probably not dramatically during  the time in which you've been on board).

    Most certainly,  it's always a good idea to pay close attention to what your body is telling you, but it's a serious mistake to suppose that it will never play you false.   Long gone, for most of us, are the days when (if ever) we were finely tuned into our bodies' messages and could safely depend on them to direct our actions.   Your statement:

    "Believe me, it will let you know, IN SPADES, very quickly if you are pushing too hard."

    is very far from the truth.  We have a wide spectrum here in age, general physical condition and overall health, such that generalisations about what's best are almost always dangerous.

    Among our younger friends here we have quite a few endurance athletes, such as triathlon types, whose normal state is an enviable level of fitness and strength.  We have seen far too many from those ranks rely to their cost on the assumption you've made above.  They've come roaring back into their previous life-styles and done themselves a lot of damage before they've discovered their current limitations. 

    Troublesome hernias are one frequent consequence but, in general, setting back their recovery and healing processes, often by many months, has been a feature we've seen all too often. 

    SO!  don't rely on your body to tell you if you're overdoing it.  Take that essential exercise but, in the first few weeks and months, errr on the side of caution!!

     

    Indeed

    Indeed TW is right... ya wanna see my hernia..?   Good news is that it is not painful... but it will always be there..  I did too much too soon, and yes I felt that rip sensation... ouch..!!   Take the time to heal up, then wait even longer before risking it...

    Ron

  • T1ffanyz
    T1ffanyz Member Posts: 41

    BAD!

    Unfortunately, Michael, that's very bad advice you're giving and liable to do some readers a lot of harm.  We've seen that proved many times here on this forum (though probably not dramatically during  the time in which you've been on board).

    Most certainly,  it's always a good idea to pay close attention to what your body is telling you, but it's a serious mistake to suppose that it will never play you false.   Long gone, for most of us, are the days when (if ever) we were finely tuned into our bodies' messages and could safely depend on them to direct our actions.   Your statement:

    "Believe me, it will let you know, IN SPADES, very quickly if you are pushing too hard."

    is very far from the truth.  We have a wide spectrum here in age, general physical condition and overall health, such that generalisations about what's best are almost always dangerous.

    Among our younger friends here we have quite a few endurance athletes, such as triathlon types, whose normal state is an enviable level of fitness and strength.  We have seen far too many from those ranks rely to their cost on the assumption you've made above.  They've come roaring back into their previous life-styles and done themselves a lot of damage before they've discovered their current limitations. 

    Troublesome hernias are one frequent consequence but, in general, setting back their recovery and healing processes, often by many months, has been a feature we've seen all too often. 

    SO!  don't rely on your body to tell you if you're overdoing it.  Take that essential exercise but, in the first few weeks and months, errr on the side of caution!!

     

    My 15 minutes in the water

    As u can see I spent 15 minutes in the pool today and as much as I tried to love it, my 1 piece speedo felt like a straight jacket! It was so tight against my incision that all i wanted to do was get out of it.  I just waded in the water, a kid bumped into me, and tonight 6 hrs later I'm having to take Advil.  I think the combo 45 min drive, 2 hr shopping, and swim all contributed. It sucks but I needed a weekend to celebrate my health and my journey before summersend. 

     

    thanks for the feedback....no more water for me!

  • Djinnie
    Djinnie Member Posts: 945
    T1ffanyz said:

    My 15 minutes in the water

    As u can see I spent 15 minutes in the pool today and as much as I tried to love it, my 1 piece speedo felt like a straight jacket! It was so tight against my incision that all i wanted to do was get out of it.  I just waded in the water, a kid bumped into me, and tonight 6 hrs later I'm having to take Advil.  I think the combo 45 min drive, 2 hr shopping, and swim all contributed. It sucks but I needed a weekend to celebrate my health and my journey before summersend. 

     

    thanks for the feedback....no more water for me!

    Limitations

    Hi Tiffany, You did more than push the boat out with that combination. A couple of days rest and the pain should settle down again. At least this experience will give you a marker as to where you are in your recovery. There is a lot of healing to take place and it will continue for some time, everything has to be approached with caution. Just delay your celebrations for a little while longer.

    I think the water therapy is a good idea though, when you are ready. Maybe not in a speedo though lol!

    Hope you feel better soon:)

    Djinnie x

  • dhs1963
    dhs1963 Member Posts: 513
    T1ffanyz said:

    My 15 minutes in the water

    As u can see I spent 15 minutes in the pool today and as much as I tried to love it, my 1 piece speedo felt like a straight jacket! It was so tight against my incision that all i wanted to do was get out of it.  I just waded in the water, a kid bumped into me, and tonight 6 hrs later I'm having to take Advil.  I think the combo 45 min drive, 2 hr shopping, and swim all contributed. It sucks but I needed a weekend to celebrate my health and my journey before summersend. 

     

    thanks for the feedback....no more water for me!

    Are you ok with Advil?

    Often they recommend no advil post nephrectomy, primarly because Advil is harsh on the kidneys.  It depends on your creatinine level.   Advil is off my diet....I am stuck with sucky tylenol.

  • MDCinSC
    MDCinSC Member Posts: 574

    BAD!

    Unfortunately, Michael, that's very bad advice you're giving and liable to do some readers a lot of harm.  We've seen that proved many times here on this forum (though probably not dramatically during  the time in which you've been on board).

    Most certainly,  it's always a good idea to pay close attention to what your body is telling you, but it's a serious mistake to suppose that it will never play you false.   Long gone, for most of us, are the days when (if ever) we were finely tuned into our bodies' messages and could safely depend on them to direct our actions.   Your statement:

    "Believe me, it will let you know, IN SPADES, very quickly if you are pushing too hard."

    is very far from the truth.  We have a wide spectrum here in age, general physical condition and overall health, such that generalisations about what's best are almost always dangerous.

    Among our younger friends here we have quite a few endurance athletes, such as triathlon types, whose normal state is an enviable level of fitness and strength.  We have seen far too many from those ranks rely to their cost on the assumption you've made above.  They've come roaring back into their previous life-styles and done themselves a lot of damage before they've discovered their current limitations. 

    Troublesome hernias are one frequent consequence but, in general, setting back their recovery and healing processes, often by many months, has been a feature we've seen all too often. 

    SO!  don't rely on your body to tell you if you're overdoing it.  Take that essential exercise but, in the first few weeks and months, errr on the side of caution!!

     

    Duly Noted!

    Thanks for the corrective response!

    I should have qualified that with noting that it was MY personal experience and that I am a far different person!

    Thanks again!