Forgetfulness, inability to put my thoughts into words..

cinreag
cinreag Member Posts: 154
Does anybody know of any foods or supplements that will help with bad memory and inability to express your thoughts?
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Comments

  • herdizziness
    herdizziness Member Posts: 3,624
    Fish Oil
    is supposed to help, I prefer to get mine by eating fish a couple times or more a week, but I think they come in capsules. I'm sure there are other things that I don't know about, but others will chime in.
    Here's to a better memory,
    Winter Marie
  • cinreag
    cinreag Member Posts: 154

    Fish Oil
    is supposed to help, I prefer to get mine by eating fish a couple times or more a week, but I think they come in capsules. I'm sure there are other things that I don't know about, but others will chime in.
    Here's to a better memory,
    Winter Marie

    Thank you.

    Thank you.
  • thxmiker
    thxmiker Member Posts: 1,278
    Cinnamon, Potassium, Gingko
    Cinnamon, Potassium, Gingko Bilboa, and Fish Oil was already said.

    Juicing for Life is a great reference for foods that sooth and help heal the body. One can eat or juice to get the nutrition.

    The Anti-Cancer Diet is another good book about how we can assist the body to heal, and the inspiring treatments that are coming. (Written by a Neural Surgeon whom went through Cancer.)

    I got both books on ebay for under $10 each w/shipping.

    Best Always, mike

    PS I take all but Ginko.
  • cinreag
    cinreag Member Posts: 154
    thxmiker said:

    Cinnamon, Potassium, Gingko
    Cinnamon, Potassium, Gingko Bilboa, and Fish Oil was already said.

    Juicing for Life is a great reference for foods that sooth and help heal the body. One can eat or juice to get the nutrition.

    The Anti-Cancer Diet is another good book about how we can assist the body to heal, and the inspiring treatments that are coming. (Written by a Neural Surgeon whom went through Cancer.)

    I got both books on ebay for under $10 each w/shipping.

    Best Always, mike

    PS I take all but Ginko.

    Thank you for the response.
    Thank you for the response. Will def check into the books and the supplements tomorrow. Lucky for me I like to read!!
  • cinreag
    cinreag Member Posts: 154

    Fish Oil
    is supposed to help, I prefer to get mine by eating fish a couple times or more a week, but I think they come in capsules. I'm sure there are other things that I don't know about, but others will chime in.
    Here's to a better memory,
    Winter Marie

    fish oil
    Hi Winter Marie. I had to disappear for a few, Im on a phone and it was giving me problems. What kind of fish do you eat to get the good fish oil?
  • Doc_Hawk
    Doc_Hawk Member Posts: 685
    Welcome to Chemo-brain
    I read an article in Chemo Magazine about two years ago that said milk and coffee are both good to counter the effects of chemo-brain. Salmon and Halibut are both rich in Omega-3, the fish oil that helps.
  • herdizziness
    herdizziness Member Posts: 3,624
    cinreag said:

    fish oil
    Hi Winter Marie. I had to disappear for a few, Im on a phone and it was giving me problems. What kind of fish do you eat to get the good fish oil?

    Salmon
    Is my fish of choice, tuna is good but I worry about mercury from it, so only eat it once a month, I also eat tapia fish and halibut, but I believe that salmon is best and I have no scientific basis for this other then my mother is half Alaskan Native and my grandmother full and I was raised in Alaska, and they taught me that salmon had a good amount of fish oil, halibut a second. But that may have been for my region.
    Winter Marie
  • cinreag
    cinreag Member Posts: 154
    Doc_Hawk said:

    Welcome to Chemo-brain
    I read an article in Chemo Magazine about two years ago that said milk and coffee are both good to counter the effects of chemo-brain. Salmon and Halibut are both rich in Omega-3, the fish oil that helps.

    Chemo-brain
    Wow. I can tell joining this site sure is going to be one of my smarter moves, already. You guys are great. I was the first person in my family to ever be diagnosed with cancer. I can tell just by reading the few blogs and posts that I have read that I did not ask near enough questions about my illness or the treatments. My mother and dad went to my first several onc/chemo appointments with me but they had no idea what questions to ask either.
  • herdizziness
    herdizziness Member Posts: 3,624
    cinreag said:

    Thank you for the response.
    Thank you for the response. Will def check into the books and the supplements tomorrow. Lucky for me I like to read!!

    Potassium
    If you are on chemo, depending which one, you tend to get potassium loss, I have a bottle of pills prescription from my onc when it got to bad (I knew when the cramping of muscles would get bad) and take them for a couple of days, because the loss was too much for bananas to help. But I notice after getting my potassium back up and eating a banana a day since then, I haven't had a potassium problem. My belief (and this is only my belief) is that I prefer as much as possible to get my supplements (fish oil, potassium , vitamin D , etc) when possible from natural foods then supplements in the pill form, I believe the body absorbs it better, Mike does the same for the most part I think?
    Winter Marie
  • cinreag
    cinreag Member Posts: 154

    Salmon
    Is my fish of choice, tuna is good but I worry about mercury from it, so only eat it once a month, I also eat tapia fish and halibut, but I believe that salmon is best and I have no scientific basis for this other then my mother is half Alaskan Native and my grandmother full and I was raised in Alaska, and they taught me that salmon had a good amount of fish oil, halibut a second. But that may have been for my region.
    Winter Marie

    salmon
    Would you care to share some pointers on how you prepare it? I love salmon patties made from canned salmon. Would that be a good way to get salmon into my diet? By the way, Im Cindy.
  • herdizziness
    herdizziness Member Posts: 3,624
    cinreag said:

    salmon
    Would you care to share some pointers on how you prepare it? I love salmon patties made from canned salmon. Would that be a good way to get salmon into my diet? By the way, Im Cindy.

    Hello Cindy
    My favorite way to prepare salmon (by the way salmon patties are my son's and my top 5 ways to eat salmon) is to grill it, I take two layers of tin foil lay the salmon on it, take a lemon and squeeze half onto the salmon, then Morton's seasoning salt and sprinkle over salmon, chop a sweet onion and add that on top, fold foil over, but on grill for 20 minutes check and see if it flakes, if not keep checking every 5 minutes, I do this in winter and summer. I save some of the onion, mince it, add chopped dill pickles, squeeze the other half of lemon on that, add some mayonnaise and stir which provides me with tarter sauce.
    And yes canned salmon and salmon patties are a great way to get the benefits from it as well.
    Oh, by the way, you can do the same thing to the salmon in the oven at 350 , just put the foil wrapped salmon on a baking sheet.
    Winter Marie
  • cinreag
    cinreag Member Posts: 154

    Potassium
    If you are on chemo, depending which one, you tend to get potassium loss, I have a bottle of pills prescription from my onc when it got to bad (I knew when the cramping of muscles would get bad) and take them for a couple of days, because the loss was too much for bananas to help. But I notice after getting my potassium back up and eating a banana a day since then, I haven't had a potassium problem. My belief (and this is only my belief) is that I prefer as much as possible to get my supplements (fish oil, potassium , vitamin D , etc) when possible from natural foods then supplements in the pill form, I believe the body absorbs it better, Mike does the same for the most part I think?
    Winter Marie

    I'm not taking chemo. I
    I'm not taking chemo. I havent been in treatment for 2 years.
  • cinreag
    cinreag Member Posts: 154

    Hello Cindy
    My favorite way to prepare salmon (by the way salmon patties are my son's and my top 5 ways to eat salmon) is to grill it, I take two layers of tin foil lay the salmon on it, take a lemon and squeeze half onto the salmon, then Morton's seasoning salt and sprinkle over salmon, chop a sweet onion and add that on top, fold foil over, but on grill for 20 minutes check and see if it flakes, if not keep checking every 5 minutes, I do this in winter and summer. I save some of the onion, mince it, add chopped dill pickles, squeeze the other half of lemon on that, add some mayonnaise and stir which provides me with tarter sauce.
    And yes canned salmon and salmon patties are a great way to get the benefits from it as well.
    Oh, by the way, you can do the same thing to the salmon in the oven at 350 , just put the foil wrapped salmon on a baking sheet.
    Winter Marie

    Great info!!
    Great. Thank you so much.
  • Doc_Hawk
    Doc_Hawk Member Posts: 685
    cinreag said:

    salmon
    Would you care to share some pointers on how you prepare it? I love salmon patties made from canned salmon. Would that be a good way to get salmon into my diet? By the way, Im Cindy.

    Howdy Cindy
    Salmon is one of my favorite fish especially for sashimi and sushi. When I do cook it, my preferred method is smoking. When I do that I get several large filets and smoke enough to last most people a month (me about three days!) I like hard smoke (what we grew up calling Indian Candy) as opposed to gravlax or soft smoked. I also make a pretty good salmon thermidor and Hawaiian Lomi Lomi salmon which is "cooked" by first curing with salt and then marinating in citrus juice.

    Ray/Doc
  • Doc_Hawk
    Doc_Hawk Member Posts: 685
    At a loss for words ...
    You mentioned an inability to put thoughts into words in your header. When I was was first dx'd I was in grad school and the classes involve sitting around a table and discussing that week's reading. Many times after I started on chemo I would have the word I wanted to say perfectly clear in my head, could even write it down but just could not get it to come out of my mouth until someone else said. I rather imagined that was something that a person with a bad stutter would feel like as you struggled to get a word out. I'd start saying "bean town, Paul Revere's ride, the Big Dig!) just because I couldn't say the word Boston. It still happens sometimes but it's not as bad as I've learned to sneak up on words by a back door approach.
  • cinreag
    cinreag Member Posts: 154
    Doc_Hawk said:

    At a loss for words ...
    You mentioned an inability to put thoughts into words in your header. When I was was first dx'd I was in grad school and the classes involve sitting around a table and discussing that week's reading. Many times after I started on chemo I would have the word I wanted to say perfectly clear in my head, could even write it down but just could not get it to come out of my mouth until someone else said. I rather imagined that was something that a person with a bad stutter would feel like as you struggled to get a word out. I'd start saying "bean town, Paul Revere's ride, the Big Dig!) just because I couldn't say the word Boston. It still happens sometimes but it's not as bad as I've learned to sneak up on words by a back door approach.

    Doc_Hawk you just described
    Doc_Hawk you just described it to a T!!!! I know exactly what I am wanting to say but always 1 word will get me hung up. I just have to wait for whomever Im talking with to supply the word to get me going again. Never thought about it before but a stutterer probably does know exactly how I feel. Hopefully this can be reversed. I have already started exercising my brain some. I could stand to step that up a little (or a lot).
  • cinreag
    cinreag Member Posts: 154
    Doc_Hawk said:

    At a loss for words ...
    You mentioned an inability to put thoughts into words in your header. When I was was first dx'd I was in grad school and the classes involve sitting around a table and discussing that week's reading. Many times after I started on chemo I would have the word I wanted to say perfectly clear in my head, could even write it down but just could not get it to come out of my mouth until someone else said. I rather imagined that was something that a person with a bad stutter would feel like as you struggled to get a word out. I'd start saying "bean town, Paul Revere's ride, the Big Dig!) just because I couldn't say the word Boston. It still happens sometimes but it's not as bad as I've learned to sneak up on words by a back door approach.

    Doc_Hawk you just described
    Doc_Hawk you just described it to a T!!!! I know exactly what I am wanting to say but always 1 word will get me hung up. I just have to wait for whomever Im talking with to supply the word to get me going again. Never thought about it before but a stutterer probably does know exactly how I feel. Hopefully this can be reversed. I have already started exercising my brain some. I could stand to step that up a little (or a lot).
  • cinreag
    cinreag Member Posts: 154
    Doc_Hawk said:

    At a loss for words ...
    You mentioned an inability to put thoughts into words in your header. When I was was first dx'd I was in grad school and the classes involve sitting around a table and discussing that week's reading. Many times after I started on chemo I would have the word I wanted to say perfectly clear in my head, could even write it down but just could not get it to come out of my mouth until someone else said. I rather imagined that was something that a person with a bad stutter would feel like as you struggled to get a word out. I'd start saying "bean town, Paul Revere's ride, the Big Dig!) just because I couldn't say the word Boston. It still happens sometimes but it's not as bad as I've learned to sneak up on words by a back door approach.

    Back door approach
    Hmmm.... will have to have "sneaking up on words by a back door approach" explained to me. My guess would be one of two possible meanings 1) talk very slowly or 2) try to talk very fast and get your words out before your brain has a chance to forget. But I would be interested in hearing what your meaning is.
  • ketziah35
    ketziah35 Member Posts: 1,145
    It is called chemobrain in
    It is called chemobrain in various places. My mom ended chemo in2010. Chemo brain is a mainstay now along with neurapothy. She has a reflexologist to help with that.
  • cinreag
    cinreag Member Posts: 154
    ketziah35 said:

    It is called chemobrain in
    It is called chemobrain in various places. My mom ended chemo in2010. Chemo brain is a mainstay now along with neurapothy. She has a reflexologist to help with that.

    chemobrain
    I was told to expect it during treatment but I expected it would go away after stopping treatment. This site is going to be an insanity savior for me. I may even start realizing that Im not crazy after all. I literally knew nobody that had dealt with cancer and therefore had nobody I could talk to who was actually going through the same things I was.