colds-advice

cww71964
cww71964 Member Posts: 97
What is safe to take for a head cold when we have one kidney? I came down with one last night and I took some tylenol cold medicine today, is that safe to continue?

Health and Happiness to all,

Wayne
«1

Comments

  • MikeK703
    MikeK703 Member Posts: 235
    Tylenol for colds?
    Hi Wayne,
    Tylenol (acetaminophen) is one of the few over-the-counter pain killers that are not taboo to us. However, if you plan to continue with the cold medicine, I suggest you call your urologist or nephrologist, as there are ingredients other than acetaminophen in it and I doubt if anyone here would feel comfortable telling you to go ahead and take it.
    Mike
  • Texas_wedge
    Texas_wedge Member Posts: 2,798
    MikeK703 said:

    Tylenol for colds?
    Hi Wayne,
    Tylenol (acetaminophen) is one of the few over-the-counter pain killers that are not taboo to us. However, if you plan to continue with the cold medicine, I suggest you call your urologist or nephrologist, as there are ingredients other than acetaminophen in it and I doubt if anyone here would feel comfortable telling you to go ahead and take it.
    Mike

    Tylenol
    Mike, isn't it just straight acetaminophen? Other brands contain that plus other ingredients. We don't know the name in Europe where, like the rest of the world, it's usually known as paracetamol. Avoid much use of ibuprofen if you have problem kidney(s) and avoid acetaminophen if you have liver problems. I would have thought moderate use of it just to combat a cold for a few days unlikely to do any material harm but your suggestion of seeking expert advice of course makes sense.
  • MikeK703
    MikeK703 Member Posts: 235

    Tylenol
    Mike, isn't it just straight acetaminophen? Other brands contain that plus other ingredients. We don't know the name in Europe where, like the rest of the world, it's usually known as paracetamol. Avoid much use of ibuprofen if you have problem kidney(s) and avoid acetaminophen if you have liver problems. I would have thought moderate use of it just to combat a cold for a few days unlikely to do any material harm but your suggestion of seeking expert advice of course makes sense.

    Tylenol
    Tex,
    The only active ingredient in Tylenol the pain killer (Tylenol Regular Strength, Tylenol Extra Strength) is acetaminophen (there are scores of other "inactive ingredients") but the Tylenol Cold Medicines have other "active ingredients" as well -- I don't have a label in front of me but in one of them there is a cough suppressant, an antihistamine, and a nasal decongestive. All with long unpronounceable names. Those are the ones I am not sure about.
    Mike
  • Texas_wedge
    Texas_wedge Member Posts: 2,798
    MikeK703 said:

    Tylenol
    Tex,
    The only active ingredient in Tylenol the pain killer (Tylenol Regular Strength, Tylenol Extra Strength) is acetaminophen (there are scores of other "inactive ingredients") but the Tylenol Cold Medicines have other "active ingredients" as well -- I don't have a label in front of me but in one of them there is a cough suppressant, an antihistamine, and a nasal decongestive. All with long unpronounceable names. Those are the ones I am not sure about.
    Mike

    Tylenol
    Thanks Mike - that makes your advice to Wayne look all the wiser.
  • Limelife50
    Limelife50 Member Posts: 476
    Hi Wayne
    What I used,which might be a little different than most people was all day allergy medicine like clariton ,also used nasal sprays they work great for clearing those sinuses ,I also have been told it is a good ideal to avoid any medications containing NSAIDS,hope I got that right,any ways hope you feel better soon.
  • cww71964
    cww71964 Member Posts: 97

    Hi Wayne
    What I used,which might be a little different than most people was all day allergy medicine like clariton ,also used nasal sprays they work great for clearing those sinuses ,I also have been told it is a good ideal to avoid any medications containing NSAIDS,hope I got that right,any ways hope you feel better soon.

    colds
    Went to the family doc yesterday and told him my symptoms, cold and stiff neck. He checked to make sure I didn't have signs of meningitis and when that was clear he said I had a respiratory something and my stiff neck was caused by sneezing, Yea whatever, what can you do for me? He said to treat the symptoms, I said ok with what? I asked if Tylenol Cold was ok, pulls out his iphone and googles it (like I hadn't already done that) and said should be ok as long as I don't take a ton of it. Really amazing advice doc. The he said I will give you an prescription naproxin for you neck. I asked if that was ok with only one kidney, he said, oh, probably not, just try some heat. Needless to say I left there lacking confidence in my quality of healthcare.
  • cww71964
    cww71964 Member Posts: 97

    Hi Wayne
    What I used,which might be a little different than most people was all day allergy medicine like clariton ,also used nasal sprays they work great for clearing those sinuses ,I also have been told it is a good ideal to avoid any medications containing NSAIDS,hope I got that right,any ways hope you feel better soon.

    nose spray
    I have been using the nose spray, it does help a lot. I do have some Clariton I can try as well.

    Thanks for the advice,

    Wayne
  • livealive
    livealive Member Posts: 127
    cww71964 said:

    nose spray
    I have been using the nose spray, it does help a lot. I do have some Clariton I can try as well.

    Thanks for the advice,

    Wayne

    Stiff neck
    Wayne, for the stiff neck, try ice 20 mins..if that does not work, then try moist heat - alternating can work too...you will see some relief..I have had a herniated disc for years, back goes into spasms, seems to be better with the weight loss now...but it helped the spasms..
    Thx.
  • livealive
    livealive Member Posts: 127
    Wayne ?
    Hey I emailed you, wanted to check what's going, if you feel any changes etc. - when you get a chance ?
  • foxhd
    foxhd Member Posts: 3,181
    livealive said:

    Wayne ?
    Hey I emailed you, wanted to check what's going, if you feel any changes etc. - when you get a chance ?

    Aspirin
    I've always been an advocate of aspirin. But now with the MDX, inflammation is encouraged.So anything but low dose 81 mg ASA is discouraged. So, I just deal with everything. Acetaminophen is what is recommended. Never cared for that.
  • livealive
    livealive Member Posts: 127
    foxhd said:

    Aspirin
    I've always been an advocate of aspirin. But now with the MDX, inflammation is encouraged.So anything but low dose 81 mg ASA is discouraged. So, I just deal with everything. Acetaminophen is what is recommended. Never cared for that.

    Aspirin
    I was reading on CNN about aspirins antic cancer properties, it all keeps changing from one 'truth' to another ...
  • Texas_wedge
    Texas_wedge Member Posts: 2,798
    livealive said:

    Aspirin
    I was reading on CNN about aspirins antic cancer properties, it all keeps changing from one 'truth' to another ...

    Aspirin and cancer
    Raj, it's not really as contradictory as appears. Aspirin has been, and continues to be, a wonder drug in many respects and its utility in reducing risk from heart attack, stroke and cancer, for instance, are well established.

    The latest research emanates from Oxford Uni, and has been very widely reported upon in the UK. It seems very clear that regular low dose aspirin reduces the risk of suffering from many forms of cancer AND is an effective treatment also, for those who have cancer, in reducing the likelihood of metastasis. However, there have long been known to be contraindications, in particular in respect of internal bleeding so you mustn't take it for a while in advance of surgery. You may have conditions that make taking it less desirable and it's thought that over 70's should only do so if approved by their GP.

    Unfortunately, the beneficial effects appear not to apply to kidney cancer, but maybe the picture will become clearer with further research.

    One interesting side-light on the economic interests involved is apparent from this bit in an article in the UK newspaper, The Guardian:

    Can aspirin help people with cancer?

    Aspirin appears to slow the spread of cancer, but doctors need to do studies on patients to confirm how effective the drug is. "If you have a new diagnosis of cancer then, with the exception of children, I think no matter what age you are, it's worth thinking about. The drugs you are already taking are much more dangerous than aspirin," Rothwell said.

    When was aspirin's anticancer effect discovered?

    Studies in mice in the 1960s showed that aspirin slowed the spread of cancer, but the research never made it into clinics, partly because aspirin was off patent, so companies had little to gain from funding trials."

    [Peter Rothwell is the man behind the latest research.]
  • foxhd
    foxhd Member Posts: 3,181

    Aspirin and cancer
    Raj, it's not really as contradictory as appears. Aspirin has been, and continues to be, a wonder drug in many respects and its utility in reducing risk from heart attack, stroke and cancer, for instance, are well established.

    The latest research emanates from Oxford Uni, and has been very widely reported upon in the UK. It seems very clear that regular low dose aspirin reduces the risk of suffering from many forms of cancer AND is an effective treatment also, for those who have cancer, in reducing the likelihood of metastasis. However, there have long been known to be contraindications, in particular in respect of internal bleeding so you mustn't take it for a while in advance of surgery. You may have conditions that make taking it less desirable and it's thought that over 70's should only do so if approved by their GP.

    Unfortunately, the beneficial effects appear not to apply to kidney cancer, but maybe the picture will become clearer with further research.

    One interesting side-light on the economic interests involved is apparent from this bit in an article in the UK newspaper, The Guardian:

    Can aspirin help people with cancer?

    Aspirin appears to slow the spread of cancer, but doctors need to do studies on patients to confirm how effective the drug is. "If you have a new diagnosis of cancer then, with the exception of children, I think no matter what age you are, it's worth thinking about. The drugs you are already taking are much more dangerous than aspirin," Rothwell said.

    When was aspirin's anticancer effect discovered?

    Studies in mice in the 1960s showed that aspirin slowed the spread of cancer, but the research never made it into clinics, partly because aspirin was off patent, so companies had little to gain from funding trials."

    [Peter Rothwell is the man behind the latest research.]

    aspirin
    If aspirin was invented today, we'd probably need a script and it would be expensive. The "wonder" drug.
  • livealive
    livealive Member Posts: 127
    foxhd said:

    aspirin
    If aspirin was invented today, we'd probably need a script and it would be expensive. The "wonder" drug.

    Aspirin
    Maybe I can pop a few a day ?
  • garym
    garym Member Posts: 1,647
    livealive said:

    Aspirin
    Maybe I can pop a few a day ?

    Aspirin...
    One caution...too much aspirin can cause tinnitus (ringing in the ears) which I have from relying heavily on aspirin years ago. I've found that one low dose every morning and one full strength before exercising works well for me.
  • Texas_wedge
    Texas_wedge Member Posts: 2,798
    garym said:

    Aspirin...
    One caution...too much aspirin can cause tinnitus (ringing in the ears) which I have from relying heavily on aspirin years ago. I've found that one low dose every morning and one full strength before exercising works well for me.

    Aspirin
    Oh Fox, you're so cynical! :)
    Gary, are you sure the tinnitus isn't due to Harley crashing, plus repeated clips round the ear for the jokes you come up with?
    Raj - yes, unless you are advised of any contra-indicating factors, regular low-dose aspirin (buffered, preferably) might have a lot to commend it for you. Ask your medicos and tell us what they say.
  • garym
    garym Member Posts: 1,647

    Aspirin
    Oh Fox, you're so cynical! :)
    Gary, are you sure the tinnitus isn't due to Harley crashing, plus repeated clips round the ear for the jokes you come up with?
    Raj - yes, unless you are advised of any contra-indicating factors, regular low-dose aspirin (buffered, preferably) might have a lot to commend it for you. Ask your medicos and tell us what they say.

    Speaking of which...
    A businessman was attending a conference in Africa . He had a free
    day and wanted to play a round of golf and was directed to a golf
    course in the nearby jungle. After a short journey, he arrived at the
    course and asked the pro if he could get on.

    “Sure,” said the pro, “What’s your handicap?”

    Not wanting to admit that he had an 18 handicap, he decided to cut it
    a bit. “Well, it’s 16,” said the businessman, “but what’s the
    relevance since I’ll be playing alone?”

    “It’s very important for us to know,” said the pro, who then called a caddy.

    “Go out with this gentleman,” said the pro, “his handicap is 16.”

    The businessman was very surprised at this constant reference to his
    handicap. The caddy picked up the businessman’s bag and a large rifle.
    Again, the businessman was surprised, but decided to ask no questions.
    They arrived on the 1st hole, a par-4.

    “It’s wise to avoid those trees on the left,” said the caddy. Needless
    to say, the businessman duck-hooked his ball into the trees. He found
    his ball and was about to punch it out when he heard the loud crack of
    the rifle and a large snake fell dead from a tree above his head.

    The caddy stood next to him with the rifle smoking in his hand.
    “That’s the Black Mamba, the most poisonous snake in all Africa .
    You’re lucky I was here with you.”

    After taking a bogey, they moved to the 2nd hole, a par-5. “Good to
    avoid those bushes on the right,” says the caddy. Of course, the
    businessman’s ball went straight into the bushes. As he went to pick
    up his ball, he heard the loud crack of the caddy’s rifle once again,
    and a huge lion fell dead at his feet.

    “I’ve saved your life again,” said the caddy.

    The 3rd hole was a par-3 with a lake in front of the green. The
    businessman’s ball came up just short of the green and rolled back to
    the edge of the water. To take a shot, he had to stand with one foot
    in the lake. As he was about to swing, a large crocodile emerged from
    the water and bit off much of his right leg. As he fell to the ground
    bleeding and in great pain, he saw the caddy with the rifle propped at
    his side, looking on unconcernedly.

    “Why didn’t you kill it?” asked the man incredulously.

    “I’m sorry, sir,” said the caddy. “This is the 17th handicap hole. You
    don’t get a shot here.”

    And that, my golfing friends, is why you should never lie about your
    handicap!
  • Texas_wedge
    Texas_wedge Member Posts: 2,798
    garym said:

    Speaking of which...
    A businessman was attending a conference in Africa . He had a free
    day and wanted to play a round of golf and was directed to a golf
    course in the nearby jungle. After a short journey, he arrived at the
    course and asked the pro if he could get on.

    “Sure,” said the pro, “What’s your handicap?”

    Not wanting to admit that he had an 18 handicap, he decided to cut it
    a bit. “Well, it’s 16,” said the businessman, “but what’s the
    relevance since I’ll be playing alone?”

    “It’s very important for us to know,” said the pro, who then called a caddy.

    “Go out with this gentleman,” said the pro, “his handicap is 16.”

    The businessman was very surprised at this constant reference to his
    handicap. The caddy picked up the businessman’s bag and a large rifle.
    Again, the businessman was surprised, but decided to ask no questions.
    They arrived on the 1st hole, a par-4.

    “It’s wise to avoid those trees on the left,” said the caddy. Needless
    to say, the businessman duck-hooked his ball into the trees. He found
    his ball and was about to punch it out when he heard the loud crack of
    the rifle and a large snake fell dead from a tree above his head.

    The caddy stood next to him with the rifle smoking in his hand.
    “That’s the Black Mamba, the most poisonous snake in all Africa .
    You’re lucky I was here with you.”

    After taking a bogey, they moved to the 2nd hole, a par-5. “Good to
    avoid those bushes on the right,” says the caddy. Of course, the
    businessman’s ball went straight into the bushes. As he went to pick
    up his ball, he heard the loud crack of the caddy’s rifle once again,
    and a huge lion fell dead at his feet.

    “I’ve saved your life again,” said the caddy.

    The 3rd hole was a par-3 with a lake in front of the green. The
    businessman’s ball came up just short of the green and rolled back to
    the edge of the water. To take a shot, he had to stand with one foot
    in the lake. As he was about to swing, a large crocodile emerged from
    the water and bit off much of his right leg. As he fell to the ground
    bleeding and in great pain, he saw the caddy with the rifle propped at
    his side, looking on unconcernedly.

    “Why didn’t you kill it?” asked the man incredulously.

    “I’m sorry, sir,” said the caddy. “This is the 17th handicap hole. You
    don’t get a shot here.”

    And that, my golfing friends, is why you should never lie about your
    handicap!

    Aspirin and cancer
    Gary, forgive me if I should know the answer already but why do you take aspirin regularly?

    The latest research on this topic has elicited animated debate in the british press. One of the more interesting items, which I find persuasive is this:

    "Then on the conflict between the profit motive and patient health:

    Here's a useful recent survey of aspirin & cancer, 1968-2011.

    In rather understated academic terms, it reinforces the idea that aspirin has indeed been largely disregarded in favour of much more expensive and toxic drugs because, as a medical friend told me, 'there's no money in it' (he wrote a doctorate on the lowly drug 25 years ago, and is now clinical director of one of the largest hospitals in the UK).

    The article concludes:

    Current drug development work recognises that the growth of tumours involves cross-talk between different signalling pathways, and that resistance develops to agents that have a single target. Aspirin affects multiple intracellular pathways and influences physiological processes such as apoptosis and angiogenesis that are important in the growth and development of malignancies. Publicly funded researchers have a responsibility to ensure that drugs for which there is no longer a financial incentive for pharmaceutical companies to develop further are assessed in light of current knowledge and evolving clinical practice. Aspirin pre-dates current anti-cancer strategies such as the use of adjuvant chemotherapy after a potentially curative operation. Although significant tumour shrinkage is not seen when aspirin is administered for other clinical indications such as cardiovascular disease, epidemiological evidence and pre-clinical data suggest that aspirin is worthy of further investigation particularly in the adjuvant setting, after potentially curative surgery and chemotherapy if appropriate, when disease burden is expected to be minimal.

    There is also potential for wider health benefits; colorectal cancer shares similar risk factors, such as smoking and the metabolic syndrome, with coronary artery disease; thus, aspirin could potentially be beneficial from both an oncological and cardiological perspective (Chan et al, 2007). In any future trials the challenge will be to identify and exclude those individuals most at risk of toxicity, for example, those with a previous history of gastric ulceration (Patrono et al, 2001) and include those most likely to benefit.

    The current limited testing of aspirin (http://clinicaltrials.gov) as a therapeutic agent either in the adjuvant setting (ASCOLT and Big A trial) or in combination with other anti-cancer agents is in marked contrast to the number of studies that were initiated using selective Cox-2 inhibitors before 2004. There were numerous phase II studies and at least 12 randomised phase III trials that were ongoing in 2004, before the concerns about cardiovascular toxicity [of Cox-2 inhibitors targeting only a single pathway] were raised, with >9000 planned participants including those with breast, colorectal, oesophageal, prostate and lung malignancies. A number of these studies involved rofecoxib and had to be discontinued when the product was withdrawn. Others were stopped early although the investigational agent (usually celecoxib) was not withdrawn.

    Aspirin continues to be evaluated in vitro and in pre-clinical models to help elucidate mechanisms involved in carcinogenesis and the response of tumours to anti-neoplastic agents. Recent randomised evidence from trials primarily designed to prevent cardiovascular disease show a reduction in cancer incidence with long-term follow-up and epidemiological evidence from colorectal and breast cancer studies evaluating the effects of aspirin use after diagnosis suggests that aspirin may have a role in the adjuvant setting. The clinical management of patients is also continually evolving, with new combinations of agents or strategies being assessed; aspirin should not be overlooked in this process because it is neither new nor expensive."
  • Texas_wedge
    Texas_wedge Member Posts: 2,798

    Aspirin and cancer
    Gary, forgive me if I should know the answer already but why do you take aspirin regularly?

    The latest research on this topic has elicited animated debate in the british press. One of the more interesting items, which I find persuasive is this:

    "Then on the conflict between the profit motive and patient health:

    Here's a useful recent survey of aspirin & cancer, 1968-2011.

    In rather understated academic terms, it reinforces the idea that aspirin has indeed been largely disregarded in favour of much more expensive and toxic drugs because, as a medical friend told me, 'there's no money in it' (he wrote a doctorate on the lowly drug 25 years ago, and is now clinical director of one of the largest hospitals in the UK).

    The article concludes:

    Current drug development work recognises that the growth of tumours involves cross-talk between different signalling pathways, and that resistance develops to agents that have a single target. Aspirin affects multiple intracellular pathways and influences physiological processes such as apoptosis and angiogenesis that are important in the growth and development of malignancies. Publicly funded researchers have a responsibility to ensure that drugs for which there is no longer a financial incentive for pharmaceutical companies to develop further are assessed in light of current knowledge and evolving clinical practice. Aspirin pre-dates current anti-cancer strategies such as the use of adjuvant chemotherapy after a potentially curative operation. Although significant tumour shrinkage is not seen when aspirin is administered for other clinical indications such as cardiovascular disease, epidemiological evidence and pre-clinical data suggest that aspirin is worthy of further investigation particularly in the adjuvant setting, after potentially curative surgery and chemotherapy if appropriate, when disease burden is expected to be minimal.

    There is also potential for wider health benefits; colorectal cancer shares similar risk factors, such as smoking and the metabolic syndrome, with coronary artery disease; thus, aspirin could potentially be beneficial from both an oncological and cardiological perspective (Chan et al, 2007). In any future trials the challenge will be to identify and exclude those individuals most at risk of toxicity, for example, those with a previous history of gastric ulceration (Patrono et al, 2001) and include those most likely to benefit.

    The current limited testing of aspirin (http://clinicaltrials.gov) as a therapeutic agent either in the adjuvant setting (ASCOLT and Big A trial) or in combination with other anti-cancer agents is in marked contrast to the number of studies that were initiated using selective Cox-2 inhibitors before 2004. There were numerous phase II studies and at least 12 randomised phase III trials that were ongoing in 2004, before the concerns about cardiovascular toxicity [of Cox-2 inhibitors targeting only a single pathway] were raised, with >9000 planned participants including those with breast, colorectal, oesophageal, prostate and lung malignancies. A number of these studies involved rofecoxib and had to be discontinued when the product was withdrawn. Others were stopped early although the investigational agent (usually celecoxib) was not withdrawn.

    Aspirin continues to be evaluated in vitro and in pre-clinical models to help elucidate mechanisms involved in carcinogenesis and the response of tumours to anti-neoplastic agents. Recent randomised evidence from trials primarily designed to prevent cardiovascular disease show a reduction in cancer incidence with long-term follow-up and epidemiological evidence from colorectal and breast cancer studies evaluating the effects of aspirin use after diagnosis suggests that aspirin may have a role in the adjuvant setting. The clinical management of patients is also continually evolving, with new combinations of agents or strategies being assessed; aspirin should not be overlooked in this process because it is neither new nor expensive."

    Aspirin and cancer
    Given the significance of the topic, I make no apology for quoting this article which appeared on Tuesday, also in the Uk's Guardian newspaper:

    "In some people, such as pregnant women at risk of high blood pressure, the benefits of taking aspirin are said to outweigh the risks. However, to date, cancer has not been part of this calculation.

    Rothwell said it was time to think again. "It's certainly time to add prevention of cancer into the analysis of the balance of risk and benefits of aspirin. So far, all the guidelines have just been based on the prevention of strokes and heart attacks.

    "This research really shows that the cancer benefit is as large, if not larger, than the benefit in terms of preventing heart attacks and strokes. It does change the equation quite drastically."

    A spokeswoman for the Department of Health said: "We are currently considering how to ensure the public gets the best advice on this issue, given that there are risks as well as potential benefits from taking aspirin."

    Rothwell suggested that the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, which issues treatment guidelines for the NHS, should issue advice on the use of aspirin to combat cancer.

    "I think it would be helpful in the fullness of time if a body like Nice, for example, would come up with an independent recommendation on the basis of all the evidence that has been gathered," he said. "That would give people confidence."

    Nice has never been asked by the department to develop guidance on aspirin and cancer prevention.

    But the drug is mentioned in the latest Nice guidance on colorectal cancer. It says that "regular use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), notably aspirin, seems to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer".

    Two American experts commenting in The Lancet pointed out some limitations to the research. Dr Andrew Chan and Dr Nancy Cook, from Harvard Medical School in Boston, said the analysis did not include findings from two large US trials that failed to show an anti-cancer benefit from taking aspirin every other day. Some analyses were also limited by the quality of available data.

    However the US experts concluded: "These caveats notwithstanding, Rothwell and colleagues show quite convincingly that aspirin seems to reduce cancer incidence and death."
  • Beingbless
    Beingbless Member Posts: 46

    Aspirin and cancer
    Given the significance of the topic, I make no apology for quoting this article which appeared on Tuesday, also in the Uk's Guardian newspaper:

    "In some people, such as pregnant women at risk of high blood pressure, the benefits of taking aspirin are said to outweigh the risks. However, to date, cancer has not been part of this calculation.

    Rothwell said it was time to think again. "It's certainly time to add prevention of cancer into the analysis of the balance of risk and benefits of aspirin. So far, all the guidelines have just been based on the prevention of strokes and heart attacks.

    "This research really shows that the cancer benefit is as large, if not larger, than the benefit in terms of preventing heart attacks and strokes. It does change the equation quite drastically."

    A spokeswoman for the Department of Health said: "We are currently considering how to ensure the public gets the best advice on this issue, given that there are risks as well as potential benefits from taking aspirin."

    Rothwell suggested that the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, which issues treatment guidelines for the NHS, should issue advice on the use of aspirin to combat cancer.

    "I think it would be helpful in the fullness of time if a body like Nice, for example, would come up with an independent recommendation on the basis of all the evidence that has been gathered," he said. "That would give people confidence."

    Nice has never been asked by the department to develop guidance on aspirin and cancer prevention.

    But the drug is mentioned in the latest Nice guidance on colorectal cancer. It says that "regular use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), notably aspirin, seems to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer".

    Two American experts commenting in The Lancet pointed out some limitations to the research. Dr Andrew Chan and Dr Nancy Cook, from Harvard Medical School in Boston, said the analysis did not include findings from two large US trials that failed to show an anti-cancer benefit from taking aspirin every other day. Some analyses were also limited by the quality of available data.

    However the US experts concluded: "These caveats notwithstanding, Rothwell and colleagues show quite convincingly that aspirin seems to reduce cancer incidence and death."

    A bucket of warm water with salt and ginger
    Hi,
    This is a traditional Chinese home remedy way if you like to give it a try. My sister sent me a book of cancer survival expience from Asia. I thouught to share with anyone who will be interested.

    Boil a pot of hot water with a piece of unpeeled ginger (about your palm size) with 30 g of salt. When it's boiling, turn down the heat and let it comtinues to boil for another 30 min.

    Pour the hot water into a tall bucket, and adjust the water temperature by reducing to 42 degr C. by adding in some cold water. Keep some hot water in the pot for later use.

    The water level in the bucket needs to cover your legs below the knee high. Put in a ping pong ball, when the water is warm hot( can not be too cold), start using the ping pong ball to message your feet. Step your feet on the ping pong ball. This will circulate your feet and also help you to get rid of the cold by purified your body system.

    Sit there for 30 min. If the temperature of the water turns cold, please add in more hot water from the pot you have just boiled. You should be sweating after that. Drink a cup of warm beverage follow that.

    Beside the cold, there are so many cancer patients living prove in Asia has benefited from this method. This method can be used after surgery or at anytime. The best result is used it everyday.

    Sweating is one way to get rid of our 'waste' or 'poison' ( Chinese called it) from our body system. The more you sweat, and if the sweat is smelling, that means your body is reacting to the purity system, which will be a good thing. Therefore the temperature of the water is very important to start with.

    Since I am a cancer patient, I have started this process, and I see the benefit, beside the sweat, it relaxes my muscle, and help me to get a better sleep at night too.

    Hope this helps if you're interested to try.