CSN Login
Members Online: 10

You are here

stage iv survivors?

druidshadow's picture
druidshadow
Posts: 85
Joined: Feb 2012

i know minni asked about the stage 3 ones that is gave me the thought, everyone i have talked to outside this board has said that stage iv is treatable and they can make you comfy whle your life lasts but it is not cure able i need to know that there is a chance to go ned and that some have gotten past the 5 years most are given i was given only 3 at the most, i know take it one day at a time and all but i am not ready to think that in 3 years my sons and step daughter will not have a father i want to be there for my kids wedding days and when they all find love, please tell me that there are folks that have made it past this point well past this point. i start my second round of chemo starting monday and belive it or not i am more scared then when i did the first round 2 weeks ago.

john

Buckwirth's picture
Buckwirth
Posts: 1272
Joined: Jun 2010

mCRC Survival by Year of DX

It tracks survival by year of diagnoses. The study was in 2009, and at the moment, is the most up to date report I have come across.

You should hear from Phil and Craig, among others, who have made it well past the five year mark.

There are other factors that can improve those odds, or reduce them, but none of us are doctors and we should not be giving you a prognosis.

Good luck,

Blake

pepebcn's picture
pepebcn
Posts: 6352
Joined: Aug 2010

Hugs.

peterz54's picture
peterz54
Posts: 343
Joined: Feb 2012

I believe biologicals such as Avastin began to be used about that time to augment chemo...

PhillieG's picture
PhillieG
Posts: 4885
Joined: May 2005

I was diagnosed in Feb of 2004, one month later Avastin went on the market. They did the trials at Sloan Kettering. I had been inoperable due to a large tumor on my hepatic artery. I was able to do 5 months of Avastin out of the 6 months on FOLFOX. On September 21, 2004 I had my surgery for the liver resection, colon resection, HAI pump installation, gallbladder removal, and a few lymph nodes removed. Without the Avastin I most likely would not have been able to be operated on.

My first opinion did not give me this plan, the second one did. It was good timing and I am fortunate to have a good oncologist. That can not be stressed enough. Get the opinion for the BEST oncologist you can find. They don't have to do everything, they can just offer a plan of action. If you have some hack/quack operate or advise you first, it's very hard to undo things for one, and/or possibly your window of opportunity will have passed and then it's playing catch-up. BTW: I had my 2nd opinion at Sloan. I paid for it myself. The best $350 I ever spent. I had a different doctor carry the plan of action out due to insurance issues. I was able to have the surgery at Sloan do to intervention that was done where I work on my behalf.

The next drug that came out was Erbitux. That too has helped keep things in check.
It's slowed or stopped the growth of my lung tumors. I've been on it about 6 years or so...

New drugs are coming out. I had posted a few weeks ago how my niece is currently working on new cancer drugs that target certain attributes of cancer. Colon cancer in particular.
Advances ARE being made contrary to opinions that you may read online.
-p

Actsassy's picture
Actsassy
Posts: 37
Joined: Nov 2010

Hi Phil,

I am stage iv colon cancer patient with mets to liver. Was daignosed in May 2009. Was going to hospital here that is cancer only hospital,. suppose to be one of the best. Doc i saw was head of the department. Anyway they said could only control it with chenmo. No surgery. Well i was doing chemo and it had reduced my lesions and was down to where it was unseen. was off everything for a few months. then in Sept 2010 i started have the lesions growing again. went thru a lots of things along with that. husband had heart attacka nd by pass and other things, all at once. I was in a state of panic and anxiety. Well i got sick in may of 2011 with bacterial infection and my docs didn't do a whole lot or me nor felt that i was being heard. I was referred to another doc/facility. Went one las ttime to see the old doc and again i felt rediagnosed and was told that no surgerya and liver would look like swiss cheese. Long story short. new onco disagreed with just about everything the other doc said. New aggressive chemo and liver specialist. i saw liver specialsit and he said yes he said i could have surgery. long story short, i did agressive chemo and it shrunk a lot in a month. l had surgery on both my colon resection and lesions on liver zapped. as of right now i am ned. i just finished my heavy duty chemo and will be doing mainteance erbitux weekly tlll september.
liver specialist says may need to have liver zapped here and there throughout. It is looked at as a chronic disease. so i will be 3 years in may. good luck to you.... and we keep moving forward.

PhillieG's picture
PhillieG
Posts: 4885
Joined: May 2005

Wow! What a ride you had. I'm glad that things are going better now but it's (unfortunately) yet another example of WHY IT'S IMPORTANT TO GET A SECOND OPINION.
Don't mean to shout but it can't be stressed enough...
I hope you and your hubby are doing better.
-p

Actsassy's picture
Actsassy
Posts: 37
Joined: Nov 2010

Hi Phil,

I am stage iv colon cancer patient with mets to liver. Was daignosed in May 2009. Was going to hospital here that is cancer only hospital,. suppose to be one of the best. Doc i saw was head of the department. Anyway they said could only control it with chenmo. No surgery. Well i was doing chemo and it had reduced my lesions and was down to where it was unseen. was off everything for a few months. then in Sept 2010 i started have the lesions growing again. went thru a lots of things along with that. husband had heart attacka nd by pass and other things, all at once. I was in a state of panic and anxiety. Well i got sick in may of 2011 with bacterial infection and my docs didn't do a whole lot or me nor felt that i was being heard. I was referred to another doc/facility. Went one las ttime to see the old doc and again i felt rediagnosed and was told that no surgerya and liver would look like swiss cheese. Long story short. new onco disagreed with just about everything the other doc said. New aggressive chemo and liver specialist. i saw liver specialsit and he said yes he said i could have surgery. long story short, i did agressive chemo and it shrunk a lot in a month. l had surgery on both my colon resection and lesions on liver zapped. as of right now i am ned. i just finished my heavy duty chemo and will be doing mainteance erbitux weekly tlll september.
liver specialist says may need to have liver zapped here and there throughout. It is looked at as a chronic disease. so i will be 3 years in may. good luck to you.... and we keep moving forward.

Varmint5's picture
Varmint5
Posts: 384
Joined: Feb 2012

Blake, the graph is interesting, but does not include people who have had liver resection. Including them would make a dramatic and favorable difference for stage IV cc patients.

peterz54's picture
peterz54
Posts: 343
Joined: Feb 2012

true, but only a fraction of Stage IV get resection, so it needs to be separated out as its own graph. My wif as a stage IV does no yet know if she will be a candidate for surgery..

Doc_Hawk's picture
Doc_Hawk
Posts: 685
Joined: Jan 2012

Hi Peter, do you know why some patients are eligible to liver resections and others not? I've been told that I'm not a candidate but was only told that it would not fix the problem. My sister even offered a transplant, but my Oncologist said that it wouldn't work for me.

I've printed out the graph that was linked, but I was diagnosed in 2011, does anyone have any up dated stats?

Buckwirth's picture
Buckwirth
Posts: 1272
Joined: Jun 2010

Is pretty current, and I think the authors did a good job of designing this one. Even if the same data were reviewed today it would only provide real numbers to 2006, and there have not been any major changes to the standard of care in the last five years

peterz54's picture
peterz54
Posts: 343
Joined: Feb 2012

Doc I am wrestling with that issue now for my wife who is halfway through chemo with hope that tumors will become resectable... I have found resources which elaborate but do not have at my fingertips. will try to locate and post. my recollection is that there are several parameters which are considered. size of tumors. involvement of arteries. whether cancer resides elsewhere (other than colon and liver), physical condition of patient, etc. but precise criteria is hard to pin down.

will try to post later

PhillieG's picture
PhillieG
Posts: 4885
Joined: May 2005

A question. Where are you going for treatment?
There was someone how posted how Thier Onc said they could not do anything to help his liver. Indirected them to my Onc, dr. Kemeny at Sloan Kettering in NYC who looked at his scans etc, and she believes that he can be helped by having a HAI pump therapy, something she's pioneered.
Not for nothing, it might be worth a call. Many people are under her care and are around years later and cancer free.
-phil

Doc_Hawk's picture
Doc_Hawk
Posts: 685
Joined: Jan 2012

Sorry for the late reply, I just got back from vacation. I was first diagnosed and treated at Northern Arizona Oncology in Flagstaff Arizona. After I moved to Utah, I started going to Northern Utah Oncology and Hematology, which is an offshoot of the Huntsman Clinic. My liver is riddled with tumors and I do have two in my right lung as well.

Ray

PhillieG's picture
PhillieG
Posts: 4885
Joined: May 2005

Hope you had a great vacation...
I do know of about a half dozen people with a similar scenario as you with numerous liver mets. I was one of them. There are treatments out there. The HAI pump is an effective one even though some oncs will say differently. Possibly they don't know enough about it.
It's worth looking into IMO
-phil
Man, I just re-read my post. I love my iPad but it makes up words if you're not careful.

There's a great site called damnyouautocorrect.com that has funny iPad/iPhone mistakes...

peterz54's picture
peterz54
Posts: 343
Joined: Feb 2012

presentation by Dr Paty of MSKCC in 2009 discussing why most CRC patients should start with chemo and not surgery.

2009 Dr Paty Presentation

2011 slide presentation with some useful information relating to liver resection - surgical criteria, lessons learned, and survival statistics

2011 Presentation

peterz54's picture
peterz54
Posts: 343
Joined: Feb 2012

duplicate

peterz54's picture
peterz54
Posts: 343
Joined: Feb 2012

you might want to check into the work by Yuman Fong at MSKCC. he developed a clinical scoring system which can be used to help determiine suitability for resection of liver mets.
the scoring system uses these criteria: nodal status of primary, disease-free interval
from the primary to discovery of liver metastases <12 months, number
of tumors >1, preoperative CEA level >200 ng/ml, and size of the
largest tumor >5 cm.

2010 paper by Fong is titled: Use of Clinical Score to Stage and Predict Outcome of
Hepatic Resection of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

keep in mind that if a person is not a candiate for surgery at time of diagnosis, then chemo may be used to shrink tumors to the point where surgery becomes and option.

pluckey's picture
pluckey
Posts: 484
Joined: Jul 2009

search Sloan Kettering Site for Dr. Yuman Fong. He has a presentation online about the increase in liver resectability over the years. He did my liver resection.

As far as what makes someone resectable or not - My understanding is that it is a combo of objective and subjective factors. The number of tumors, the location of those tumors, what other cancer is currently in the body, and the overall health of the patient. Can the patient withstand the surgery and subsequent recovery.

My original surgeon told me, when I asked "Why can't you do the liver resection on me?" Responded "It's not a matter of can i do it, it is SHOULD I do the surgery". I did not undertand that comment at all. looking back, I think she felt I wasn't strong enough to handel the surgery. I had just recovered from another hospitlization0 bowel obstruction. I was 90 lbs and looked like death. She reversed my ileostomy. THAT was a turning point, as I began to stop having so much chemo/ileo diarreah and started gaining weight and getting stronger. So when I went to Sloan for 2nd opinion, Dr Fong saw me stronger and able to handle the surgery.

peterz54's picture
peterz54
Posts: 343
Joined: Feb 2012

x

Buckwirth's picture
Buckwirth
Posts: 1272
Joined: Jun 2010

Scratch that...

Brenda Bricco
Posts: 579
Joined: Aug 2011

Hi John,
I am writing you from the hospital,my husband just had liver resection last Wednesday in Madison Wi. When first dxed in our small town the doc was quick to tell us that it was terminal and that it would be two years (some less, some more). I want you too know that I sat in the post surgery room with my husband's children and one of the best liver surgeons I know of and she told us that we could see a cure. I almost jumped out of my chair when she said it. I was sort of in shock but then again since dx I have had the gall to dream of a cure for him even when we were told it wouldn't happen, that we need a miracle.
I do the same thing you are doing now from time to time... I try to imagine what the future might bring. The thing you need to be able to do is regognize when it's a time of feeling down and know that there will an "up" before you know it. I know what it feels like to be afraid, the thing that helps me is prayer. Sometimes I feel like I am so afraid that I forget to pray but that is alright, I believe GOD knows my heart and knows what I need.
I don't know what your faith is but I will be saying a prayer for you to find comfort and strength. Sometimes I wonder why I let myself go to the dark places I go but then again it just makes me realize how much I have, that I don't want to lose. It sounds like you have a lot to live for, I pray that you do just that everyday.

God's blessing to you!
Brenda

relaxoutdoors08
Posts: 520
Joined: May 2011

John,
Everyone who has been diagnosed with cancer feel just as you are feeling today. But Fear is not our friend. For me I needed to reach deep and muster all the courage, and hope I could, in order to prepare for chemo. Also for me it was preparing for all possibilities. My husband and I completed our wills, trusts, estate planning, and medical directives and then I was ready to do battle. I also had the priest give me the anointing of the sick with the words; courage, hope, and health. These became my prayer words. I used these prayerful words all through chemo anytime I felt the fear. I imagined those pacman eating the cancer cells when I felt the worst during chemo. I used these prayer words with each scan.

Now I try to take it one step at a time. I learned from those on this board how to take one step at a time, one test at a time, one scan at a time with hope.

Sending my prayers: Courage, Hope, and Health.
NB

Doc_Hawk's picture
Doc_Hawk
Posts: 685
Joined: Jan 2012

God Bless, NB. About a week and a half after my dx, it was the first gloriously perfect weather day in Flagstaff AZ that year (2009 - 2010, we had 12 feet of snow that winter)and my best friend and I had been cruising around town on my motorcycle and after lunch we had to part company for a few hours before meeting up again for karaoke. I looked at her and said "It's a great day to be alive." Then I paused and thought a second before adding "and in January when it's snowing two feet an hour it'll still be a great day to be alive." Since that day, it has become my Mantra and I say it at least once a day. Right now it's 5:45 am, in 15 minutes I'll have been up for 24 hours and that's on top of a 4 hour night of sleep. But, it's a great day to be alive!

God Bless

Doc Ray

John23's picture
John23
Posts: 2140
Joined: Jan 2007

Overall, cancer (all types of cancer combined), has a 25% survival rate.

That statistic has not changed in nearly 40 years. Stage four colon
cancer is usually considered to provide us with a 2% survival rate.

Diagnosis is being made earlier thanks to modern technology,
but medical treatment (chemo, etc) has not advanced enough to
be of serious value.

It's great to have folks telling us that there is great renewed hope
for longevity, and how far the industry has advanced in the fight
against cancer, but the facts simply do not bear their beliefs out.

The statistics have not changed, although the time from first
diagnosis to one's final hours, has. As a Norweigian study
had once pointed out.... we're not "living longer", we're just
being diagnosed sooner.

Although a search through the archives here will indicate the
amount of individuals that are no longer able to post.... And
although the percentages of those that have died, versus those
that remain, should be noted and compared to the real statistics..

It should not be reason to give up hope; it should be reason to
plan ahead for what is considered to be the inevitable, but never
to dispel hope!

Most of us had not considered writing a will prior to our diagnosis.

Having an attorney lead you through the all the legal tangles of
real-estate transfer, motor vehicle, bank and credit contracts, etc,
will make life easier for your survivors during their difficult time
of sorrow and grief.

Insuring that our loved ones are well provided for, is something that
we usually overlook doing until we have little time left, so do it now!

As far as building confidence and hope for your own longevity?

Click on the names of those that have been here the longest
and read their profiles and what course of action they've taken
for survival.

A lot has to do with "luck"....... and.... a lot has to do with proper
treatment. Some long-timers here have oncologists that are treating
their cancer as a "chronic disease", and they have lived long lives
thanks to the knowledge and expertise of those oncologists.

Others here have taken "alternate routes"......

You have to have to have the will to survive against all odds;
you were given that will and ability at birth.... You have to learn
to listen carefully to your inner being and common sense; it is
your survival instinct talking to you. Only -you- can hear it's
words, and only -you- should make your choices accordingly.

You'll do OK, John. Take a real deep breath and believe in
yourself to make the right choices.

My best wishes to you,

John23

smokeyjoe
Posts: 1428
Joined: Feb 2011

So many factors come into play....luck, yes....some are very lucky finding a doctor who will perform all kinds of procedures, giving a variety of drugs to battle, luck in how your body responds to these treatments is a huge factor. Phil is a great example of someone who has a great doc. and good response to the treatments. Others have done alternatives and have a great response. Who knows. Wishing you all the best.

PhillieG's picture
PhillieG
Posts: 4885
Joined: May 2005

People have done VERY WELL with advances in medicine...
John23, How/where/why do you post incorrect information?
P

smokeyjoe
Posts: 1428
Joined: Feb 2011

Okay, so after being on this site I went on to the Colon Club Forum to read...someone posted an article from The Toronto Star....hey this is in my neck of the woods...goes on to talk about liver surgeons....there is a man they highlight his story, he had liver cancer, told it's terminal months to live, he did chemo. the tumor didn't shrink, it didn't grow, his wife incorporated diet changes....9 years later, YES 9 YEARS, he came across a surgeon who could cut out his terminal tumor in his liver.....so what came into play here....the surgeon cannot explain if it was residual effects of the chemo, whether diet played into it. Anyhow you can go to Colon Club forum and read it for yourself, quite interesting. I'm glad I found it, I needed this lift.

PhillieG's picture
PhillieG
Posts: 4885
Joined: May 2005

One day that man will die and John23 will be proven right.... PEOPLE DIE

SmokeyJoe, I'm 8 years out of my diagnosis for Stage IV CC, with a side of liver & lung mets, also lymph node involvement.

Get a good doctor at a good facility. Ask questions, get 2nd opinions.
Use your head. Enjoy life... Someday I may die from this, or get hit by a bus, or run over by some angry guy with cancer. You don't know. I DO know that after 8 years, worrying about what may or may not happen is a total waste of (my) time.

You're only a victim if you want to be one, no one can pin that turd on you but you....

joemetz's picture
joemetz
Posts: 493
Joined: Nov 2011

Thanks Phillieg!

Excellent post.
congrats on 8 years. You are inspiration for me and others.

I'm only 8 weeks into this, but after comparable CT scan last week, things are looking up.
No NEW cancer. And, current mets in liver have reduced greatly.

For my first time, i have VERY uplifting and encouraging news.

Others... Phillieg is right, be positive. Take control of you health and don't forget to have fun and pull your family and fiends closer to you.

and... lastly, build your faith.

I never thought i'd say this, but my life is better today than it was 6 months ago... even though now i have (or know i have) Cancer, and am in the battle.

Let's all fight and encourage each other.

yes, that John guy is right... it never hurts to have a wil and be prepared... but healthy people do that.

my best

Joe

Doc_Hawk's picture
Doc_Hawk
Posts: 685
Joined: Jan 2012

That was great post, Phil, very uplifting. And like Joe, I do not look at this as an affliction, a curse, a cross to bear or whatever. It has been a life changing event (and Dear Lord, I never appreciated what those words meant until this.) I have achieved a level of serenity which had always escaped me all of my life. Things that I used to get worked up and (no pun intended -- or maybe it is) put a knot in my colon just don't matter any more. And things where I had placed little importance are now key factors in my life.

Sure, I'm tired and worn out all of the time; I refer to myself as a walking bio-hazard because the chemo has left the skin on the undersides of my hands and feet terribly cracked to the point where it's difficult doing simple things like typing, picking things up and sometimes walking is so agonizing that it brings tears to my eyes. But these just make me appreciate so much more the things that I was able to do in the past and make me look forward to the perfect body which I will have in the next life.

I had to move from Flagstaff AZ to Utah into my parents house and I've had to give up the autonomy that I enjoyed while living alone, but now I have the security of knowing when I need help, it's in the next room. I have had to come to terms with the simple fact that I'm inoperable and incurable and that the only way I can beat cancer is to die from something else, but so far there is no expiration or best when used buy date stamped on my carton. It could come next time I ride my motorcycle or eat a steak. Or it might come sometime in the 2020's. I'll be 53 in May and still tell people that I'm going to live to be 120 and get shot to death by a jealous husband.

With all of these uncertainties I have decided that for the first time in my life I have the means to be able to do what I want, when I want etc. Last fall, I bought an RV and next week I'm taking my first road trip, going back down to Flagstaff and then Prescott and Phoenix to visit friends, and more importantly, my daughter. In June, I'm going on a fishing retreat for men with cancer. And -- if gas prices don't get too out of hand and my doctor thinks it'll be safe to go a month w/o chemo -- I'll be going from there to visit friends back East and go see some of the historical sites back there. Finally, in August, I'm planning to get with some other people and go to the Sturgis Biker rally for the first time. My mother is convinced that I "came home to die." I've spent the past nine months convincing her that I left home to live.

May 19 will be my two year anniversary of my dx and I think of it as my second birthday. That is when -- after 51 years -- I learned how to live. I'll be getting a special tattoo to commemorate the occasion on my anniversary this year.

God Bless

Doc Ray

Buckwirth's picture
Buckwirth
Posts: 1272
Joined: Jun 2010

Welcome to the board. Do you happen to have any more info on that fishing retreat?

Blake

Doc_Hawk's picture
Doc_Hawk
Posts: 685
Joined: Jan 2012

Hi Blake,

Thanks for the greeting! I have the info available and will post it tomorrow after I find it. Sorry for the late reply, but I just got back from my big road trip and it was a blast!

Doc Ray

John23's picture
John23
Posts: 2140
Joined: Jan 2007

Loveya', Phil. You know that.

Those statistics I posted are as accurate and as up-to-date
as possible. I had posted links to the sites (.org, .net) numerous
times, and I'll opt to let you dig them out.

It's easy to get carried away with "statistics", Phil. It's like religion
or politics, there are facts, and there are "embellished facts", as
well as total fabrications.....

The industry would like patients to believe that there have
been remarkable advances and much reason to continue to
support the sciences involved ($$$). But lately the oncologists's
associations are speaking out and denouncing the industry's
fabricated "statistics".

To give false hope to individuals by telling them that
cancer is curable, and that new chemicals will provide them with
some profound amount of survival time, is more careless and
thoughtless than providing them with truth and insight.

People; cancer patients, need to know the real odds. Cancer
patients need to know what they're up against. This isn't some
sort of an adventure that romantic, comforting notions should
lead one down their path.

Yes, It's swell to give hope: "everything's going to be fine";
"there's a new cure for this any day now"...... but it's false hope.

This disease kills, Phil. It kills on a daily basis, and so far there
is no known cure.

A diagnosis should be sobering and a time to come to one's
senses regarding mortality.

I prefer to provide that sobering event, than pat the victim's head
and smile reassuringly.

Life is short; shorter for some of us, than others.... Being aware
of our own mortality may not be easy to face, but there comes
a time when it must be done.

My very best wishes for your continued good health.

John

tommycat's picture
tommycat
Posts: 790
Joined: Aug 2011

I dunno John...I've seen enough empirical evidence to prove that cancer does not always win. More than 25 percent...and enough to give me 100% hope.

John23's picture
John23
Posts: 2140
Joined: Jan 2007

None of us should ever lose any amount of hope; this isn't
about striking intense fear and causing lost hope.

We can not -ever- win -any- fight against -any- enemy, if we grossly
underestimate the power of that enemy.

We can do more knowing what the real facts are, than burying
our heads in the industrial sand and pretending that cancer is
fully treatable if not "beat-able".

When a DX of cancer is received, we should make our plans
for all those that will remain in our absence. Getting our papers
in order doesn't equate to giving up hope, it's just preparation
for a worse-case scenario, and something that should have
been done long before it smacked us between the eyes.

Make the plans, then fight the fight. Fighting anything is easier
when one's personal situation is organized.

The bottom line? Never, ever, lose hope.

I see individuals here giving up because they were told by their
physicians that there was nothing left to provide. No trials,
and no hope.......?

The fight shouldn't end with the failure of drugs, or herbs,
or anything else..... Hope should always remain....

Very often, it's only that hope; that drive to stay alive, that
keeps one alive.

Stay well!

John

dmdwins
Posts: 453
Joined: Aug 2008

Hi John

I was diagnosed Stage 4 in October of 2007...so that was 4 years and 4 months ago. I am currently no evidence of disease and striving to enjoy each and every day. I am keeping my fingers crossed and praying that I am lucky, blessed, fortunate enough to get to my 5 year mark in good shape. Dont give up on that hope! I havent :)

Dawn

Buckwirth's picture
Buckwirth
Posts: 1272
Joined: Jun 2010

Not the ones you pull out of a hat. I have been here for over a year, and you have never (to my knowledge) backed up your stats. You have shown you have difficulty reading statistical data (for instance, equating median with overall). In particular you keep waving the canard of early detection, and applying it to data that references ONLY late stage cancers.

Here is the full study from which I pulled that graph:

Improved Survival in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Is Associated With Adoption of Hepatic Resection and Improved Chemotherapy

This particular review covers the five year survival rate by date of dx (again, stage 4, there is no way to diagnose stage 4 "early") interesting enough, in 1990 that number was 9%, not 2%:

"Likewise, the 5-year overall survival rate increased from 9.1% for patients diagnosed in 1990 through 1997 to 13.0% for those diagnosed in 1998 through 2000 and 19.2% for those diagnosed in 2001 through 2003; 5-year overall survival is not yet available for those diagnosed from 2004 through 2006. Proportional hazards modeling of the survival curves for patients diagnosed in 2004 through 2006 predicts a 32% 5-year survival rate (95% CI, 27% to 38%)." 

Blake

relaxoutdoors08
Posts: 520
Joined: May 2011

Blake,
Thank you for the links. Prayers for you and all who are in treatment. Glad to have you back on board. You give us all hope.
NB

Buckwirth's picture
Buckwirth
Posts: 1272
Joined: Jun 2010

*

Sonia32's picture
Sonia32
Posts: 1078
Joined: Mar 2009

Knew I shouldn't have read this post so close to my scan on THursday. John 25% overall? arghhhhh great :-(

Buckwirth's picture
Buckwirth
Posts: 1272
Joined: Jun 2010

There is no "diagnosed earlier" for stage IV. By its very definition stage IV was discovered late. The data I posted is limited to stage IV patients, so the increased lifespans are real.

If you can't post legitimate info...

janderson1964
Posts: 2215
Joined: Oct 2011

Isn't that the truth. I wish they would have studies for stage IV survivors over 5 years and over 10 years. Phil Craig and I are all over 5 years and I have read about and met 10+ year survivors through the colon cancer alliance.

peterz54's picture
peterz54
Posts: 343
Joined: Feb 2012

Can you point to any study that supports this assertion of yours"

"Diagnosis is being made earlier thanks to modern technology,
but medical treatment (chemo, etc) has not advanced enough to
be of serious value."

skepticism is a valuable attribute, however, the ability to be objective is as well...

I have reviewed many studies since my wife became ill last thanksgiving and I have seen nothing to support your position of no changes, and quite a lot that makes me glad she was diagnosed in 2011 and not 2001. From what I can discern the combination of changes in chemo, biologicals, and surgery have made differences.

wmcbane
Posts: 33
Joined: May 2010

I wanted to wait until after today's CT scan to respond to this thread. I was dx'ed with stage 4 rectal cancer with metastatis to liver in Sept/Oct 2009. I was operable and had FOLFOX regimen, radiation, 2 surgeries, more FOLFOX, ending Sept 2010. As of today, NED. Prepare for the worse, but have hope and give it your best shot with exercise & modification of diet. Control blood sugar, control inflammation, boost immunity. Get to a top-level institution. It's possible it's just luck, but these seem to have made a difference for me.

druidshadow's picture
druidshadow
Posts: 85
Joined: Feb 2012

i just wanted to say congrats to you on the ned status, and i hope to make it that far one day.

john

mikew42
Posts: 114
Joined: Mar 2004

John,

I am an 8 year survivor of Stage 4 CC diagnosed in February 2004 at age 41. Afetr surgery, RFA and chemo I was NED for 6+ years with a recuurence in my liver in 2010. I had a liver resection in January of 2011 and finished my second round of chemo in Oct. 2011. I am very fortunate to once again be NED. BTW - in February 2004 I was given 1 1/2 to 2 years, but here it is 8 years later and I will be here to see my oldest son graduate from high school in June!

Take care John.

Mike

joemetz's picture
joemetz
Posts: 493
Joined: Nov 2011

Mike

thanks for sharing your note.
you are inspiration.

thanks for being here, you made my day!

THANK YOU!

joe

druidshadow's picture
druidshadow
Posts: 85
Joined: Feb 2012

thank you all for responding to my post i can not tell you how good it feels to have you all respond and see how many stage iv survivors there are on here, and to see that there is hope and it makes it not so harsh going thru this and going to and thru the chemo. my wife can only help so much but talking with you all helps bunches cause we are all going thru the same thing.
john

Brenda Bricco
Posts: 579
Joined: Aug 2011

I just want to point out that although everyone has their own ideas of how to battle this disease that everyone debating it is a stage lv survivor. I for one do not believe that there hasn't been any new ideas or treatment for the last 40 years. I have met several that have found themselves NED for very long period of times. If someone doesn't want to call it a "cure" then we will call it NEDI (the I is for indefinately). lol ;)

Pages

Subscribe to Comments for "stage iv survivors?"