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CLL and the nuclear Navy?

734gold
Posts: 8
Joined: Feb 2012

Am new here and was wondering if anybody here has been diagnosed with CLL after serving on a nuclear powered ship or submarine?

If so, any luck with the VA. I haven't as CLL isn't one of their "certified" radiation caused cancers, yet SCL (small cell luekemia) is - funny thing is most oncologist consider CLL a form of SCL!!! Good ol' VA!

Anyway, hi to all, and would like to find out about my opening question - thanks!

nasher
Posts: 507
Joined: Apr 2010

I have had thyroid cancer after serving on a nuclear powered ship...

you can always talk to the DAV or such to redress the fact that CLL is not SCL.... you will probably have to talk to your doctors and get an official diagnosis that your CLL was "as likely as not" caused by your naval carrier also if they dont recongize CLL but do SCL make sure they list it as SCL then

from wikipedia

B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL), also known as chronic lymphoid leukemia (CLL), is the most common type of leukemia. Leukemias are cancers of the white blood cells (leukocytes). CLL affects B cell lymphocytes. B cells originate in the bone marrow, develop in the lymph nodes, and normally fight infection by producing antibodies. In CLL, the DNA of a B cell is damaged, so that it cannot produce antibodies.[citation needed] Additionally, B cells grow out of control and accumulate in the bone marrow and blood, where they crowd out healthy blood cells. CLL is a stage of small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL), a type of B-cell lymphoma, which presents primarily in the lymph nodes.[1] CLL and SLL are considered the same underlying disease, just with different appearances.
----

so if this is true that is the way to start working on it

donald54
Posts: 5
Joined: May 2012

I served 10 years on a nuclear powered submarine in the weapons department dealing with nuclear weapons. I have a case with the va with very little help from the va doctors, they become brain dead when you talk about radiation. Presently I am looking for a private doctor that knows about late effect radiation exposure pherifical neuropathy. If any one know about a doctor or wants to talk about how to deal with the va email me at donald.54@live.com.

Grammy6
Posts: 8
Joined: Aug 2016

MY HUSBAND SERVED ON A NUCLEAR SUBMARINE AND HE TOO WAS DIAGNOSED WITH CLL

 

donald54
Posts: 5
Joined: May 2012

I served 10 years on a nuclear powered submarine in the weapons department dealing with nuclear weapons. I have a case with the va with very little help from the va doctors, they become brain dead when you talk about radiation. Presently I am looking for a private doctor that knows about late effect radiation exposure pherifical neuropathy. If any one know about a doctor or wants to talk about how to deal with the va email me at donald.54@live.com.

ED597
Posts: 1
Joined: Jan 2013

I served on an SSN in the mid 70's. Weapons department. I was diagnosed with B Cell CLL this past November.

I'm interested in seeing if that had anything to do with my Leukemia.

Alfred1
Posts: 3
Joined: Feb 2013

Served in the late 60's for over three years, was diagnosed 14 years ago, also kidney cancer and a brain tumor.

Grammy6
Posts: 8
Joined: Aug 2016

My husband also served on a submarine and was diagnosed with CLL

Grammy6
Posts: 8
Joined: Aug 2016

My husband also served on a submarine and was diagnosed with CLL

Alfred1
Posts: 3
Joined: Feb 2013

Was on nuclear sub for over 3 years and have had CLL for 14 years, have a claim in now with VA

Alfred1
Posts: 3
Joined: Feb 2013

Served on a nuclear sub from 1966 to 1969 was diagnosed with CLL 14 years ago, filed a claim but was turned down, did  file again.  Waiting.

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ROAGUS
Posts: 1
Joined: Apr 2015

In the late 70's and early 80's I surved on a Boomer, I got out in '83 then in June 2009 I went through surgery and treatment for brain cancer(primarey brain tumor thankfully it has been stable so far) now in 2015 I have aa leasion on my kidney suspected carcenoma. I know of one other ex-Bubblehead has died of primary brain tumor, I just wonder how meny more are out there, I am not mad but I think we have earned the rite to know what they know.

Grammy6
Posts: 8
Joined: Aug 2016

My husband served on a nuclear submarine in the 60s. 18 years ago he was diagnosed with CLL in 1999, then Kidney cancer in 2010 skin cancer, then prostate cancer, being told one did not cause the other, then a meningioma  which was not cancer, but had brain surgery, then when went back for yearly checkup found out his cancer had metastasized to his brain, after test found out it came from lung, and also went to brain.  He was t down by VA but still has open claim

ssnwidow
Posts: 3
Joined: Sep 2016

My husband's brain/spinal cord tumor was a primary tumor.  Brain stem and cervical spine to C7.  

Joe_fh
Posts: 50
Joined: Aug 2012

Funny this subject comes up.

I served on a boomer in the 70s and was diagnosed with ccRcc 3 years ago. I have two other friends whom I served with - different boats - that were also diagnosed with Kidney cancer. I once asked the VA oncologist about this he dismissed it as unfortunate coincidence.

It would be interesting to compile a list of all submariners that were stricken and compare that ratio to the ratio of the general publc.

Grammy6
Posts: 8
Joined: Aug 2016

My husband served on a nuclear submarine for over three years, he was diagnosed with Kidney Cancer in 2010 before that was CLL

ssbn641widow
Posts: 4
Joined: Aug 2018

My husband served on Nuclear sub 1981-1985 and was diagnosed with Kidney cancer in 2011 that went to his spine.  VA denies that it was service connected.  His urologist disagrees and states that the radiation has been proven to cause cancer.

Grammy6
Posts: 8
Joined: Aug 2016

my husband was on a nuclear submarine and he took was diagnosed with CLL

Grammy6
Posts: 8
Joined: Aug 2016

My husband was diagnosed with CLL in 1999 he had served on a nuclear submarine in the 60s, since then he developed kidney cancer, a brain meningioma, and a few more cancers. Has A claim with VA but they keep turning him down

ssnwidow
Posts: 3
Joined: Sep 2016

My husband was an instructor at the D1G for 2.5 years and was on a nuclear submarine after that.  It was an older skate class submarine, Sargo.  He attributed his brain tumor to a one time large dose (exceeded 3rem in 10 minutes) while doing a purification change out.  I have a claim in the VA, as did he, but he died before it was determined.  He had a brain tumor in his spine, cervical.  They said it was extremely rare, and it left him paralyzed for the last year of his life.  Prior to the paralyzation, he was in excrutiating pain for 3 years.  When we finally figured out it was more than likely from all his radiation exposure, all we got were blank looks.  He told me before we got married that he "will never live to be an old man, between the radiation and the asbestos, I will die of cancer".  He died a year ago at the age of 62.  He was vibrant and healthy, never sick.  He served in the Navy from 1971-1977.  I wish someone would look into Navy Submarine veterans and all classes of cancer.  

Grammy6
Posts: 8
Joined: Aug 2016

I know how you feel, my husband was a machinist on a sub for over three years From 1966 to 1969.   He put in a claim about 5 or 6  years ago after he  was digagnosed with CLL in 1999 and Kidney cancer in 2010.  they turned him down shen he put in for lung cancer but still waiting on CLL and kidney cancer.  His cancer spread to the bone and brain and in the end his spine.  He fought for over seventeen years with CLL and five with all the other cancers he was diagosnosed with   Every doctor said one was not caused by another until the lung cancer went to bone and the brain.  Claim is still waiting for review but he also didnt live.  

 

 

 

bobhawk52
Posts: 1
Joined: Feb 2018

I am so very sorry to hear of your loss.  You mentioned your husband received a large dose of radiation while doing a purification changeout.  I believe you are referring to the Barium Hydroxide resin changeout performed at D1G circa 1974.  If so, I was the ELT who provided radiological coverage during the resin changeout.  I too have suffered from cancer.  melanoma, basal cell, and prostate.  

Here is what I wrote in my Notice Of Disagreement about that particular event when the VA denied my radiation claim:

Radiation modeling is being used by the VA to unfairly and unjustly deny veteran radiation exposure disability claims. Models used to calculate a probability of cancer inducement on the general population are not usable to calculate individual cancer probabilities for a radiation exposed individual. Models have no information for individual health or DNA information, and therefore cannot predict individual genetic response to radiation exposure. Models have no information on where, when, or how the individual was exposed. Models have no information on exposure rate, location, or distance from a radiation source. For example, I once provided radiological coverage during a resin change-out operation. When the resin was being discharged, I experienced a “foldover” on my monitoring instrument (an AN-PDR 45, which measured radiation levels from 0 to 500 Roentgens per hour). A “foldover” event occurs when radiation levels are so intense, the radiation being emitted causes the quenching gas inside the radiation detector to go into complete saturation so as to go to full scale, and then fold over to zero. No model can account for incidents such as that. Neither can a model accurately simulate radiation exposure geometry, such as straddling radiation emitting sources, like piping or deal with transitioning (moving) radiation sources.

I hope to hear back from you.  I just found this forum.  If you don't mind, what was your husband's name?  I'm sure he and I knew each other since I was a D1G instructor from February 1972 until September 1974.  Again, I am sorry for your loss and fully understand the problems with the VA and radiation claims.  I am in the process of submitting my appeal to the Board of Veterans appeals.  I believe the "model" used by the VA to determine probable cause is fatally flawed and does not give veterans any benefit of the doubt.  It's a great model for denying claims and saving the government a lot of money, but most radiation exposed veterans are getting the shaft.   

ssnwidow
Posts: 3
Joined: Sep 2016

I have sent you a message including my email address.  I would very much like to share Jim's statement as it sounds like you received the radiation at the same time Jim did.  He said he was only allowed to work on it for 10 minutes, and after that time, they checked his badge and determined that he had exceeded the 3rem quarterly limit.  He was then "off site" for the remainder of the quarter.  Because it was at the end of the year, he was back on site within a few weeks.  You had to have known each other, he was also an instructor at that time.  He did refer to it as a "resin changeout".  I am so happy you contacted me.  I can give you a copy of Jim's signed statement.  I am so glad that he dictated it to me before he died.  His wordage was his own, in technical terms.  Also interesting is the fact that the kind of tumor Jim had was so incredibly rare that the only thing that they know for sure causes these types of tumors are previous radiation exposure.  Mostly seen in people that were treated for leukemias in their early years, then many years later, develope a spinal cord tumor.  It was a primary tumor, from the brain stem to the C-7, by the time he died.  The surgeon at Johns Hopkins stated, "this is as bad as it gets".  It was akin to a speck of sand in an oyster, growing slowly and perfectly in the center of the spinal cord for decades before it grew to where he knew he had it.  He never had a good day in the last 3 years of his life.  Excrutiating pain at first and then topped off with paralysis.  He had Brown Sequard syndrome, also.  As if every thing else wasn't hideous enough.  

ssbn641widow
Posts: 4
Joined: Aug 2018

Sorry for your loss. My husband served on a Nuclear Sub from 1981-1985.  He too passed with cancer to his kidney that went to his spine.  He had filed a claim with the VA before he passed but it too was not determined before he passed.  He was 52 years old and was also paralyzed from the tumor on his spine.  By the time we found the cancer on his Kidney, it was the size of a half gallon jug.  He wasn't one to go to the doctor.  His claim was denied and is now in appeal status.  It is hard to get anything done with the VA.  I feel like I get the run around with them. 

jbtlaw
Posts: 1
Joined: Jan 2018

Has anyone discovered a link between service on 

submarines and Bladder, Kidney cancer?

ssbn641widow
Posts: 4
Joined: Aug 2018

My husband was on the Simon Bolivar 641.  He had kidney cancer that went to his spine.

ssbn641widow
Posts: 4
Joined: Aug 2018

My husband served on the Simon Bolivar SSBN 641 Gold in the early 80's.  He was found to have a very large tumor on his right kidney in 2011 and had his kidney removed.  He was cleared of any other cancer.  In July 2014, his cancer had come back with a vengence on  his spine.  He had surgery to remove it and was going through physical therapy.  In Sept. 2014, it returned again and took over his spine.  It was removed again except for one small spot on C3.  After the last surgery he lost pretty much all of his movement and feeling in his legs.  He suffered for almost 2 years with a huge whole in is back that went to his spine, that would not heal because of the chemo medication and radiation treatments.  He had filed with the VA prior to him passing and they tried to close it out at his passing.  I was able to keep the case open, they just recently ruled on it and said that his cancer was not caused by serving on a nuclear sub, that ionizing radiation wasn't a contributing factor.  I have now requested an appeal and as some of you probably know being a widow, they don't want to help you out much. 

God Bless you all!

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