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Who likes spirulina ???

pete43lost_at_sea's picture
pete43lost_at_sea
Posts: 3908
Joined: Nov 2010

i just really love it, and believe its got lots of benefits for my health and defeating my crc.

Interested in all comments for and against.

hugs,
pete

ketziah35
Posts: 1154
Joined: Jun 2010

Doigs like it. My hubby got some and the dogs broke into it like they we're cashing a female dog in heat. Don't know what is up with that, buit keep it away from the animals.

pete43lost_at_sea's picture
pete43lost_at_sea
Posts: 3908
Joined: Nov 2010

as i understand it, its a complete protein,
an antioxidant etc etc etc

see one many abstracts that sounds reasonable to me from pubmed.
it also seems to support vitd and vegan diet.

Med Hypotheses. 2011 Oct 14. [Epub ahead of print]
Minimizing the cancer-promotional activity of cox-2 as a central strategy in cancer prevention.
McCarty MF.
Source
NutriGuard Research, Inc., 1051 Hermes Ave., Encinitas, CA 92024, USA.
Abstract
A recent meta-analysis examining long-term mortality in subjects who participated in controlled studies evaluating the impact of daily aspirin on vascular risk, has concluded that aspirin confers substantial protection from cancer mortality. Remarkably, low-dose aspirin was as effective as higher-dose regimens; hence this protection may be achievable with minimal risk. There is reason to believe that this protection stems primarily from inhibition of cox-2 in pre-neoplastic lesions. Since safe aspirin regimens can only achieve a partial and transitory inhibition of cox-2, it may be feasible to complement the cancer-protective benefit of aspirin with other measures which decrease cox-2 expression or which limit the bioactivity of cox-2-derived PGE2. Oxidative stress boosts cox-2 expression by up-regulating activation of NF-kappaB and MAP kinases; NADPH oxidase activation may thus promote carcinogenesis by increasing cox-2 expression while also amplifying oxidant-mediated mutagenesis. A prospective cohort study has observed that relatively elevated serum bilirubin levels are associated with a marked reduction in subsequent cancer mortality; this may reflect bilirubin's physiological role as a potent inhibitor of NADPH oxidase. It may be feasible to mimic this protective effect by supplementing with spirulina, a rich source of a phycobilin which shares bilirubin's ability to inhibit NADPH oxidase. Ancillary antioxidant measures - phase 2 inducing phytochemicals, melatonin, N-acetylcysteine, and astaxanthin - may also aid cox-2 down-regulation. The cancer protection often associated with high-normal vitamin D status may be attributable, in part, to the ability of the activated vitamin D receptor to decrease cox-2 expression while promoting PGE2 catabolism and suppressing the expression of PGE2 receptors. Diets with a relatively low ratio of omega-6 to long-chain omega-3 fats may achieve cancer protection by antagonizing the production and bioactivity of PGE2. Growth factors such as IGF-I increase cox-2 expression by several complementary mechanisms; hence, decreased cox-2 activity may play a role in the remarkably low mortality from "Western" cancers enjoyed by Third World cultures in which systemic growth factor activity was minimized by quasi-vegan diets complemented by leanness and excellent muscle insulin sensitivity. Practical strategies for achieving a modest degree of calorie restriction may also have potential for down-regulating cox-2 expression while decreasing cancer risk. Soy isoflavones, linked to reduced cancer risk in Asian epidemiology, may suppress cox-2 induction by activating ERbeta. In aggregate, these considerations suggest that a comprehensive lifestyle strategy targeting cox-2 expression and bioactivity may have tremendous potential for cancer prevention.

Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID: 22001128 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

smokeyjoe
Posts: 1428
Joined: Feb 2011

Wonder what attracts the dogs to it?? I take it, mix it in with veggie greens, although the veggie greens already does contain it. Sometimes I take it in pill form, but they are kinda hard to swallow. Powder is kinda hard to stir into drinks, I find it likes to cake and stick to the bottom of the cup. Okay, so I looked up spirulina for dogs, it's apparently good for pets, especially for those who like to eat grass. I know I have seen in supplements you can give to horses. It was interesting to read a label of horse supplement and see the whole list of anti-oxidants we are taking.

Buckwirth's picture
Buckwirth
Posts: 1271
Joined: Jun 2010

it basically blames "western" cancers on us being overweight:

"...quasi-vegan diets complemented by leanness and excellent muscle insulin sensitivity..."

As it happens, this is not exactly an earth shattering discovery.

There is some difference between western and eastern cancers. The rate of stomach cancer in Eastern Asia is 750% greater than in North America, and 72% of stomach cancers occur in less developed countries. The rate of liver cancer is 600% that of North America, and 84% of liver cancers occur in less developed countries.

For CRC, the rates per 100,000 for Germany, South Korea and Chinese Taipei are about the same. About 59% of CRC cases are in the more developed countries.

Breast Cancer? Seems to have an equal distribution between the more developed and less developed countries.

Lung Cancer? 55% occurs in less developed countries, and we can expect that number to increase as tobacco use declines in the west and increases in the east and the third world.

Source:

Distribution of Cancer by Type

laurettas
Posts: 372
Joined: May 2011

Did some more reading on spirulina and blue green algae. Some blue green algae puts off toxins that are bad for the liver and promote tumor growth. Sounds like the spirulina grown in the US is pretty safe but here is a report about spirulina products from China:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18569007

Oh, as far as cancer in other countries, just read that India has over one million cases of cancer each year. Lower than the US since they have 3 times the population and only double the cancer cases but still a lot of cancer. Guess curcumin doesn't always prevent cancer--or some people in India aren't eating it!

Buckwirth's picture
Buckwirth
Posts: 1271
Joined: Jun 2010

that took me here (not directly, just thought process and seeing links):

Height and CRC

Now I know why I got this (I'm 6'4"):

Height and colon cancer 

Tall people have a higher risk of colon cancer. Researchers don’t know exactly why, but it may be related to the fact that tall people grow more. Some of the same hormones and other factors that make people grow may also increase the chance that dividing cells become abnormal and turn cancerous. 

laurettas
Posts: 372
Joined: May 2011

That's quite a jaunt from spirulina to the dangers of being tall. Could you replicate it? Sometimes I have no idea how I manage to get to certain sites!

BTW Jake is only 5'10". Wonder what his excuse is?! Oh, and my dad is the shortest brother in his family and the only one to get colon cancer. Go figure--seems that my experiences are always the opposite of the norm. Maybe its my ODD coming out!

Buckwirth's picture
Buckwirth
Posts: 1271
Joined: Jun 2010

(Who?) it could be your Ood coming out.

Buckwirth's picture
Buckwirth
Posts: 1271
Joined: Jun 2010

And only 30x more expensive than milk or eggs.

To be clear, this comes from a comment on another thread that noted that spirulina was blue-green algae, and that blue-green algae has been linked to ALS, Alzheimers and other neurological disorders. Of course, once it was pointed out that the the term "blue-green algae" is used to describe multiple organisms, and that the one connected to neurological disease was not spirulina, the conversation ended.

If you have Phenylketonuria or are using an anticoagulant, it is recommended you discuss the use of spirulina with your physician.

Interesting history. The first western experience with this algae came from the Cortez expedition that ended the Aztec empire. Seems the Mesoamericans were getting it from Lake Texcoco and making it into cakes. Given the lack of agricultural protein sources for the people of the new world, using an algae makes a lot of sense.

Unlike the tomato, the chili, the potato and corn, it was not unique to the new world. The people of Chad have been making it into cakes and using it in soup for about about a millenia.

pete43lost_at_sea's picture
pete43lost_at_sea
Posts: 3908
Joined: Nov 2010

spirulina i love it, cancer rates are not the focus.

i use my milkshake maker every morning to give the powder supplements a good mix.

if you research spirulina you will likely know more than your doctor about it, otherwise they would recommend it.

just goto pubmed and find out about the research if your interested.
most of the above discussion is off the subject.

my spirulina supplies vitamin k2, bet you don't know how good that is for your heart valves and arteries and bones. just read and learn everyone if you want, my western diet was just deficient in so many essential nutrients.

in terms of fighting cancer spirulina is 10000000 times more benefical then eggs for fighting crc, thats what i believe based on my research, it is simply what i do.

what's the price of eggs goto to do with it anyway ?
my organic freerange eggs are quiet expensive. at $1 an egg.
my spirulina cost about $1 a day. so they are the same cost, of course different benefits.

thanks everyone for the discussion.

heres cheers to the green juice and good health to you all.

hugs,
pete

ps off to the pool for 50 laps today, wish me luck

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