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Colon Cancer Treatments and Decisions

flatom143's picture
flatom143
Posts: 2
Joined: Jun 2011

Last February I went to the ER due to vomiting blood and it was discovered I had a large blockage in my colon which turned out to be cancer. I had surgery the next day and about 9 inches of my colon was removed along with the tremor. They also removed 21 lymph nodes for testing. NONE of the nodes showed any signs of cancer. Since then, I have had almost every test imaginable including my most recent colonoscopy. My cancer doctor has recommended chemo. I have rejected his request (of course he thinks I am nuts). I do not have the results of yesterdays colonoscopy but I do know that they found over 40 polyps and this doctor is suggesting I have even more of my bowel removed, JUST IN CASE. I am 65 years old and believe strongly that quality is more important then quantity.

I am looking for others with similar experiences to help me make some very critical decisions. I am not a huge fan of doctors in general. I think too often they just recommend what is good for MOST people. A lot of this has to do with legal liability and your insurance coverage. If I sound cynical it is because I am.

Thanks for any and all comments.

tom b

GaryinUK
Posts: 63
Joined: Feb 2011

Tom

By your account it seems it is in the Colon only, well whilst I am the partner of a cancer sufferer and not the actual person, you want to get it all out, stop it spreading and ensure you stay healthy.

Chemo is another issue, but if the polyps turn cancerous and spread then you will have even more issues to resolve.

Gary

marygayle's picture
marygayle
Posts: 1
Joined: Jun 2011

Two years ago I swore I would never have chemo but when I was diagnosed with rectal cancer I was ready for anything.I had 33 rounds of radiation and 2 rounds of chemo.I just wanted to survive.I am 49 and two years ago I lost my sister to the same type cancer and I wanted to be around for my kids and grandkids so I jumped on it.I am cancer free now,with side effects I admit, but I am working full time and have a 10 month old new baby grandson.(he was #9).I did not have to have surgery ,Praise God, but I do live with pain everyday.One of thsoe side effects.But I manage it well.It is a hard decision but when faced with death I wanted whatever it took to live.Hope that helps.

Marianne313
Posts: 124
Joined: Mar 2011

I'm a caregiver of a family member with colon cancer. I have no insight to your situation but I did want to post that I'm sorry this happened and I do wish you all the best with the tests you have had and may have in the future.

*HUGS*
Marianne

idlehunters's picture
idlehunters
Posts: 1792
Joined: Apr 2009

My tumor was found in colon also...... removed 11" but it had burst thru colon wall and spread to distant organs...no node involvement..but still put me stage IV. I have done chemo and it has its advantages but LOTS of disadvantages also. You do not want to be here if you can AT ALL avoid it. My Opinion.... get ALL removed from inside BEFORE they turn into cancer. If you can avoid doing chemo at your stage...perhaps thru alternative methods such as diet, juicing,herbs, supplements.... I would look into that as well. You have a great frame of mind for dealing with this and I too never place myself in the "MOST" catagory..... I prefer to stay in a catagory all my own. Take care.

Jennie

biglaur's picture
biglaur
Posts: 72
Joined: Apr 2010

I went to the ER Sept '06, thought I had appendicitis. No...colon cancer, emergency surgery, 7" of my colon and the tumor removed. 14 lymph nodes removed...NO sign of disease. Dr thought no chemo necessary and I was stoked. Did blood tests every 3 months for a year and a half...started to feel crummy and insisted on a PET. Guess what...lesions in liver and lung!!!! Stage IV just like that. When we went back and looked at all my old scans...the liver lesion was there ALL along, they just missed it somehow. Bummer. I should have done chemo, shouldn't have been so quick to think I'd dodged a bullet. I did do chemo from June '08 to Feb '09, plus a clinical trial drug, stereotactic radiation in the middle, Xeloda for 6 months after all that. I'm good now...have had clean perfect scans since Feb '09, CEA is undetectable. My fingers are still crossed...but my advice to you...get a second opinion...and do whatever it takes to MAKE SURE you've gotten rid of everything. Mine was a comedy of errors on a lot of levels and I can't help but think I might have saved myself a lot of icky months if I'd not been so quick to think all was well with just the initial surgery.
Laurie

pepebcn's picture
pepebcn
Posts: 6352
Joined: Aug 2010

colon and liver resection ,decided not to do chemo and just a few months later got a recurrence wish to have done chemo! I'm an strong defender of chemo but it's your decision my friend and not an easy one, just think side effects can variate from one to the other, in my case chemo is very manageable until now just done my 8 th round now !
Hugs!

bkeen
Posts: 3
Joined: Jun 2011

I had the scope and they found mess in my colon. I had a large section removed. The cancer had spread to my liver and lungs. I went to MD Anderson and they put me on some really harsh chemo. The tumors have shrunk 75%. I go back on Aug 11 2011. You mentioned you took Xeloda and all is well. Praise God for your good health. I'm on Xeloda now. After the treatment did your feet and hands get to normal.

herdizziness's picture
herdizziness
Posts: 3642
Joined: Apr 2010

I've been doing chemo over a year and my quality of life has been GREAT. Lately I've suffered from some shoulder pain from Avastin (which is NOT CHEMO)so will probably stop that. Quality of life, watching my grandson grow, going to college full time, tending to my garden, mowing my lawn, yep, doing chemo all this time and I still have quality of life, so my advise is to think long about it, because believe it or not those of us that do chemo and end up living for years and years (plan on being one of those) we have QUALITY and QUANTITY. Just saying.
Winter Marie

pepebcn's picture
pepebcn
Posts: 6352
Joined: Aug 2010

if for life ! But not been an stg,4 I thing is worthy just to have some months of chemo.Not a big deal for me, 2 years going on and off with chemo !
Hugs !

janie1
Posts: 753
Joined: Apr 2011

I had a tumor in the colon which was removed along with 27 lymph nodes. 22 of those were positive for cancer, which caused spread to the liver. 15 tumors are in the liver. Your situation is far better than mine. If it were me, I would have more of the colon removed, whatever they suggest. Living without some of the colon is not bad for me. I had about 18 inches removed...don't even know anything is missing. The big deal is the liver. You DEFINITELY DO NOT want this to spread. So, sounds like you can "nip this in the but"....so to speak. I had 5 rounds of chemo...wasn't so bad for me. All tumors in the liver have shrunk to nothing, but I will still need major portion of the liver removed, and this is all to prevent recurrence. You are in a good position, my friend, to take care of this. I consider your age to still be very young. I don't know your other medical history, but my parents are 94 and 95 and loving life. It is your decision, but I would be proactive if it were me, considering my health otherwise is very good. Keep us posted.

scouty's picture
scouty
Posts: 1976
Joined: Apr 2004

When did Avastin stop being a chemotheraphy drug? It certainly was when I got it, it was just referred to as a targeted chemo drug that could tell the difference between a cancer cell and a healthy cell versus many of the other chemo drugs that can't.

Just curious, I've never heard anyone say it was not chemo.

smokeyjoe
Posts: 1428
Joined: Feb 2011

Actually I wondered about that too, so I looked it up and they have it listed as a chemo. drug. I didn't look to see how it's administered though...do you get it via I.V.? I hate hate hate these friggen infusions!!!

herdizziness's picture
herdizziness
Posts: 3642
Joined: Apr 2010

And had been told by nurses and onc, it isn't "chemo" I'll check why further, I knew before but I've forgotten, and let you know. I do know it's an inhibitor and also used for macular degeneration in the eye (injected in eye)also as an inhibitor.
UPDATE: HERE YOU GO, this is from the AVASTIN site and I quote "Avastin is a tumor-starving (anti-angiogenic) therapy. Avastin is not chemotherapy and works differently."
Here is their web site with the above words on it:
http://www.avastin.com/avastin/patient/overview/avastin/how/index.html
So Avastin hasn't STOPPED being a chemotherapy drug, it NEVER was. I remember thinking Avastin was chemo at first but the onc nurses and onc told me more about it informing me it wasn't when I had mentioned it being a chemo drug.
Winter Marie

smokeyjoe
Posts: 1428
Joined: Feb 2011

Huh, I went on the Avastin site this is what I found Avastin is a tumor-starving (or anti-angiogenic) therapy. Avastin is not chemotherapy and works differently.For mCRC, Avastin is taken with IV 5-FU–based chemotherapy and hits your cancer from another angle.

The purpose of Avastin is to block a protein called vascular endothelial growth factor, or VEGF. Normal cells produce VEGF, but cancer cells overproduce VEGF. Blocking VEGF may prevent the growth of new blood vessels that feed tumors

So, the makers of Avastin have that it's not a chemo. drug on their website, interesting. So, it's administered by infusion...I don't think I'd get it in any event because I had those friggen blood clots, urrrgh.

herdizziness's picture
herdizziness
Posts: 3642
Joined: Apr 2010

Yeh, I remember my onc informing me of that last year when I had referred to it as chemo, since it's given with chemo I assume that's why everyone tends to think it too is a chemo. Like I said I originally had thought the same thing.
Winter Marie

scouty's picture
scouty
Posts: 1976
Joined: Apr 2004

The maker of Avastin is trying to get it approved for all sorts of blood vessels type things like mascular degeneration, etc. so they are going to say anything to make that happen. It's all about money.

FYI, the definition of a chemotherapeutic drugs is:

"Any CHEMICAL used to treat cancer. It is usually used to refer to antineoplastic drugs."

Another definition of a non-biased website is:

"Bevacizumab (trade name Avastin, Genentech/Roche) is a drug that blocks angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels. It is used to treat various cancers, including colorectal, lung, and kidney cancer, and eye disease."

Sorry but in regards to CRC treatments, it is definitely a chemo drug with it's own list of side effects.

I'm curious as to why you being told it is not a chemo drug is so important to you Winter Marie.

Lisa P.

herdizziness's picture
herdizziness
Posts: 3642
Joined: Apr 2010

Believe what you want Lisa, heck it isn't worth arguing over. I know what my onc nurses and onc told me, then looked it up on the web for YOU, and who said it was SO IMPORTANT TO ME whether it's chemo or not??? I mentioned it in passing and then you gave a paragraph, with my name in the SUBJECT line, stating how it was chemo and questioning me as to why I didn't know that. So I simply looked up why it wasn't chemo in order for YOU to understand why I said it wasn't a chemo, YOU ASKED me a question. That simple. I answered, my apologies for doing so, apparently it wasn't what you wanted to hear. Again I apologize for answering your question to me. Not getting in an argument. Also, it was my oncologist and the oncology nurses that INFORMED ME when I mentioned it as a chemo, that it wasn't, and I TRUST MY oncologist, I like him, I think he is honest.
BUT if you really insist in wanting to know why I do differentiate between chemo and non-chemo? I CAN'T afford both the chemo Xeloda and the cell starving drug Avastin, so I have to give up one of them, I'm giving up the Avastin as I hadn't been able to afford the chemo Xeloda the past two cycles. Does it make you feel better to know that I have to make a choice of what drug to take because I don't bring in enough money? Should I ask everyone for opinions of which one to give up, or can I just state in a conversation with someone else that I'm stopping the drug that isn't chemo without mentioning ALL factors as to why (one being muscle pain from Avastin, two being I'm too poor)? Apparently not.
Winter Marie

SisterSledge's picture
SisterSledge
Posts: 342
Joined: Feb 2011

Glad to see I'm not the only one you get testy with ;-p
Janine

herdizziness's picture
herdizziness
Posts: 3642
Joined: Apr 2010

of a reply.

geotina's picture
geotina
Posts: 2117
Joined: Oct 2009

I was also told that Avastin is not a chemotherapy drug. Went on the web site and same thing stated. Never questioned it much. To us it really doesn't matter, it worked and continues to work for George.

Take care - Tina

tanstaafl's picture
tanstaafl
Posts: 1292
Joined: Oct 2010

If US doctors want to define "chemo" as cytotoxics, fine. Other researchers have used various non toxic adjuvants (e.g. cimetidine and PSK) and called their treatments immunochemotherapy.

Personally, we seem to be getting more mileage from light chemo cocktails with high dose nutrients inhibiting the same, related and more pathways as Avastin etc.

Buckwirth's picture
Buckwirth
Posts: 1272
Joined: Jun 2010

the combined use of immunotherapy and chemotherapy in the treatment or control of disease

*********************

One is immunotherapy, and one is chemotherapy, thus the need for a new word.

To the layman this is a tomayto - tomahto argument, but to the researchers involved drugs like Avastin (and Erbitux) work in very different ways from the cytotoxic drugs and need a different terminology.

herdizziness's picture
herdizziness
Posts: 3642
Joined: Apr 2010

It actually doesn't target the cell, it targets a protein (VGEF) that allows the blood vessels to grow which support the growth of a tumor (tumors produce an inordinate amount of VGEF, however normal cells also produce VGEF but not near as much)so it really doesn't know what a good cell is versus a bad (cancer) cell, it's just not allowing a growth spurt of blood vessels (good or bad)to feed the tumor via targeting the VGEF.

PhillieG's picture
PhillieG
Posts: 4888
Joined: May 2005

Since it wasn't found in your lymph nodes and in any other organs (correct?) it sounds like you'd be Stage I? I think your doc make be too anxious to do more surgery and/or treatments that may not be needed. Too often they can tend to overdo things, probably to protect their own colons from lawsuits! I probably would look into dietary changes and try to keep an eye on your situation through less extreme measures like blood-work and other non-invasive tests. I would not be keen on chemo if things looked pretty good.
I strongly agree with the quality of life issues.

I was 46 and diagnosed with stage IV colon cancer so I took a more aggressive approach to my treatment and did chemo etc. I trust my oncologist and agreed with her plan of attack and have no regrets at all. (as far as THAT goes...other things are another story!)
Best of luck to you...
-phil

geotina's picture
geotina
Posts: 2117
Joined: Oct 2009

Welcome to the Board. Cancer sure sucks. My hubby was diagnosed 3/09, Stage IV, mets to liver and lungs. Chemo is no fun, no doubt about it but it is doable. He worked full time through treatments but for infusion days.

I totally respect your thoughts on no chemo. It is your decision but I sure hope you weigh all your options.

You said your colonoscopy showed 40 plus polyps and the doctor wants to do another resection. Before making any final decisions regarding treatment wait for the pathology from those 40 plus polyps. Are they cancerous, pre-cancerous, just an annoyance or what. Once you have a complete picture then make your decision.

George met a lady in the chemo lab on Monday. She had a colonoscopy a couple years ago, they found a cancerous polyp and it was removed. No resection, no follow up. Well, she went for her annual physical and doc told her something not right. Long story short, she has cancer in her liver and lungs, it is metastatic colon cancer from that one little polyp a few years ago that was not properly treated. Had she had a resection and some follow up tests, etc., she would not be where she is today. She just said she wishes she had known and investigated that cancerous polyp a few short years ago. She said she feels fine so how can she be so sick. That is a story repeated over and over on this board, people had no clue they had cancer.

Best wishes and come back and let us know how things go. If those polyps turn out to be just a nuisance, lymph nodes clear, organs clear, I, like you, would be very tempted to say no to chemo but be very vigilant on follow ups.

Take care - Tina

khl8
Posts: 810
Joined: Nov 2009

I had a rectal tumor and the resection to remove it and then 9 rounds of chemo. I had one lymph node light up on the PET scan but it was negative when it was removed. My doc said chemo would be an additional boost to make sure a cell was notlurking anywhere. You say " Quality vs Quantity" . you are not old and have so many years left to enjoy your life. It is ultinmatly your decision. I did not have a difficult itme with the chemo, and the few side effects are worth it, knowing that I am still here for my family and to live the rest of my life with the one little thing that cancer does give us, the ability to see life differnt and to live eacvh moment as if it were your last. Take care!

Lovekitties's picture
Lovekitties
Posts: 3330
Joined: Jan 2010

Welcome to the board.

I am in your age group. I did agressive surgery (colostomy + ) but no chemo or radiation. I am now 15 months past surgery.

There are many things which impact our thoughts and decisions regarding how to deal with having had a cancer diagnosis. I have to say that one for me was the 'quality vs quantity'.

It sounds as if you have results to get yet from the colonoscopy but with over 40 polyps it sounds as if some action might be necessary.

Each and every person needs to consider their own circumstances, their own feelings/beliefs in what the medical community has to offer, and what is most important to them.

The one thing that is absolutely necessary is that whatever you decide, you can beleive now that you will not look back and wish you had taken a different path. You have to believe in your decision 100%.

Best of luck no matter your choice. I hope you will stay in touch with us.

Marie who loves kitties

scouty's picture
scouty
Posts: 1976
Joined: Apr 2004

Please get one, this is not something you want to regret down the road. There are many chemo drugs and combinations for colorectal cancer so you might want to see which one/ones he is suggesting.

It sounds like you are stage 1 and I think I remember reading something about the position on chemo for that stage is not completely agreed on giving that the long term effects of some chemos aren't worth the small percentage it gives for recurrence.

But I sure would get a second opinion. I recommend that to anyone that is diagnosed with cancer since if I had not gotten one, I would not be here today. If you can get to one of the comprehensive cancer centers, go there!!!

Lisa P.

tootsie1's picture
tootsie1
Posts: 5056
Joined: Feb 2008

Hi, Tom.

I was diagnosed at Stage 1, so posts like yours are of special interest to me. It's been about 3 1/2 years since my diagnosis and surgery. I've been "clean" until my recent colonoscopy in May. They found 1 polyp, which was determined to be benign. That worried me enough. I think if I knew they had found as many as you have, I'd be definitely thinking of getting them OUT.

*Hugs*
Gail

Kenny H.'s picture
Kenny H.
Posts: 503
Joined: Aug 2010

Id go all out against it (age)....Chemo not as bad considering. Dealing with neuropathy but rather that than other results without.

John23's picture
John23
Posts: 2140
Joined: Jan 2007

I haven't read all the posts that followed your initial question,
and started typing this immediately. If there's redundancy,
please excusa' mea'....

With colon cancer, it can traverse the colon, and do so undetected.

If you're concerned with having an Ileostomy, you have a right to
be concerned.

I have had an Ileostomy since 2006. The first six months were
a horror show. But once I took matters into my own hands, and
did what was best for me, things got better very fast.

Servicing an Ileostomy is easier than you can imagine. The ostomy
appliance needn't be obtrusive or a handicap to your sex life.

If what you're concerned with, is having an ostomy, please provide
more information. There are very important first steps to take
prior to surgery, to insure the stoma will be placed properly.

Help is here!

Best of health,

John

tanstaafl's picture
tanstaafl
Posts: 1292
Joined: Oct 2010

Life Extension Foundation has lengthy articles on colorectal cancer promoting a non-toxic approach.

We incorporated their views with others, at an even broader and higher dose nutrient schedule, for advanced colon cancer in my wife's case, along with a light immunochemotherapy cocktail that has had the surgeons scratching their heads over unusual improvement instead of deterioration.

jjaj133's picture
jjaj133
Posts: 869
Joined: Mar 2011

Hi Tom, sorry you have to be here but welcome. There is a lot of experience here, take what you learn from others and really think about it.
65! so many more years to go. I am going to be 66 soon and fully plan to celebrate my 80th birthday.
If you read my profile, you will see that i have had surgery,no chemo, surgery chemo and now surgery with chemo again. I had one cancerous polyp in the colon. and am still fighting. I had 5 years NED before it came back in the liver. Just had a 2nd liver resection and will be doing chemo in pill form for 6 months. It is doable. I have a friend who has 50-60 polyps removed all the time. so far none have been malignant. Wait til the results come back. Then make the decision. Get a second opinion. Please, weigh all your options. Not only for yourself, but for your family.
Good Luck, I hope the test results are good.
Judy

RickMurtagh's picture
RickMurtagh
Posts: 584
Joined: Feb 2010

I had two huge tumors and many polyps. I went through chemo and radiation, had my entire colon removed and had more chemo. I now have a permanent ileostomy, but I would ay my quality of life right now is pretty darn good. In fact so good I am beginning to train for a triathlon sometime around fall 2012 to celebrate living. I suppose it depends greatly what you would qualify as having a good life.

The reason I had the whole colon removed, etc. was my polyps had a tendency to become cancerous and I did not want to chase cancer my entire life. My dx was 2009 and at the moment I am glad I made the decisions I had. Other than the whole cancer thing, I have always enjoyed pretty darn good health. Don't you wish you could look into a crystal ball and know for sure? I hope your crystal ball gazers (fiends, doctors and assorted other inputs) give you the data you need to make a decision you will be happy with, regardless of the eventual outcome.

Sounds like if you chose to leave things as they are you would just have to be diligent in checking on your health (blood tests, colonoscopies, etc.), which you would have to do even if you chose a more radical approach, like I did. There are plenty of people here with success stories that did not involve much more than taking care of what was minimally required and then paid beter attention to their diet (most of us tend to, right?). We have lost good peeps here on both sides of the treatment fence. Cancer just sucks the life out of you.

Best wishes
Rick

I am currently 51.

smokeyjoe
Posts: 1428
Joined: Feb 2011

Rick it sounds like you've recovered from your recent ordeal, training for a triathalon is GREAT!!!! Did they ever figure out what the heck was going on, was it an infection or what???

RickMurtagh's picture
RickMurtagh
Posts: 584
Joined: Feb 2010

Yes, it was a chronic infection, ate away part of my sacrum, gave me a blockage and everything. The only indication that it might not be cancer (other than a mess of biopsies) was that my CEA did not rise, but that was never a good indicator for me anyways. Now that the drugs have all been consumed it is a just sit and wait situation. My last biopsy (an area they did not want to go into during the surgery for the permanent ileo) showed nothing but scar tissue. My blockage and therefore ileo remain. That scar tissue is not likely to shrink and open up my jpouch. Too little small intestine left to mess with it more, unless I want to guarantee lifetime IV treatments and tube feeding. No thank you! After two years I am really starting to live a better life. Still tired like an old dog, but doing well - thanks for asking.

If only I could manage to get a job, life would be really great. Selling the house and moving someplace cheaper really sucks, but hey, it is all better than dying of cancer.

thxmiker's picture
thxmiker
Posts: 1282
Joined: Oct 2010

I would still consider having the blood work checked for Octreotides, H5IAA and CEA. If any of these rise, then consider to look for the issue. I had similar symptoms and treatment for my first time with cancer at 44 years old. My CEA went through the roof and I had another colon blockage 3 years later. Had my medical team been watching my CEA closer I probably would not have such a difficult second surgery and treatment.

Quality of Life is everything! Start a balanced diet and start thinking about high antioxidents to help prevent future cancer. Cheers to a long life Tom!
Best Always, mike

2bhealed's picture
2bhealed
Posts: 2085
Joined: Dec 2001

Hello Tom,

In 2001, at 39, I was dx'ed with Stage III colon cancer (sigmoid), 2/19 lymph pos, zero mets. Adjuvant chemo of 5FU and leucovorin was recommended by the Mayo Clinic. I opted to NOT do any chemo and embarked on a different path that led me to Eastern Medicine for healing while using Western diagnostics and surgery.

The chemo scared me more than the cancer since 9 years before my diagnosis my 33 year old sister had died of small intestinal cancer after having both chemo and radiation. My grandfather died of lung cancer after having conventional treatment as did my aunt of breast cancer. No one in my family survived their cancer for very long, and I know that in my sister's case she was worse after the chemo.

The thing about allopathic doctors and western medicine in general is that they "practice" medicine. They are taught about medications that alleviate symptoms but they are not taught root cause healing. Cancer is a symptom of a deeper root problem. Eastern healing is based on root causes that focuses on holistic and personal cases -- tailored for you. It's not a one-size-fits-most approach.

So you can decide which approach you want to follow; and for me, I based mine on digging to the root cause. I am still researching and digging and uncovering problems and potential problems after 10 years (remaining cancer free too, by the way, so it's worked for me), all the while building up my immune system rather than depleting it with dumping cytotoxic chemicals into my body.

There is definitely a place for western style doctors and I wouldn't be alive today if it weren't for my wonderful surgeon (who actually advised me against the chemo). My oncologist has also been quite supportive of my choices.

Because of my choice to decline the chemo I will never fear secondary cancers from the chemo, nor will I fear chemo-induced leukemia. I will not have to deal with chemo-induced permanent heart and/or kidney damage, peripheral neuropathy, fatigue, mouth sores, rashes, hair loss, chemo-brain etc etc etc.

The foundation of my protocol was diet and juicing along with the Traditional Chinese Medicine. I consulted with a Naturopathic Doctor who tweaked my diet and helped with supplement choices, but my TCM was my hands-on gal who did acupuncture, massage, aromatherapy, counseling, Chinese herbs, etc.

I loosely followed The Gerson Method for the juicing, a vegan/macrobiotic diet for detoxing. To this day I still juice for maintenance.

These are just some of the references that helped me:

Beating Cancer with Nutrition by Patrick Quillin
A Cancer Battle Plan by Anne Frahm
Prescription for Nutritional Healing by Balch and Balch
Spontaneous Healing by Dr. Andrew Weil
The pH Miracle by Dr. Robert Young

www.cancerdecisions.com

As for the issue of removing the colon due to the multiple polyps, I second scouty's advice to get a 2nd opinion. My own onc had colon ca with multiple polyps and they were able to save enough to not get a bag. Just a thought.

I hope this helps.

peace, emily

thingy45's picture
thingy45
Posts: 633
Joined: Apr 2011

HI Tom,
In april I was diagnosed with colorectal cancer, on April 25 I Had a left Hemicolectomy 34 cm of colon removed and 4 cm of rectum, no stoma.My tumor was high up on the left side. Tumor the size of a basball had exploded and reattached it self at three different places. All 9 lymphnodes taken came back clear.
Onc. advised chemo and radiation for 24 weeks. as a preventative messure. He frowned on my decision and warned me that if the cancer reoccured I might be incurable.
I obted for the naturopath. MY decision, I know the risks.
I think it is induvitual for each of us which direction we choose, as long as we are aware of the risks what is involved with our decisions. Reoccurance can always happen.Cancer is cancer.
You have polyps and the have to be taken care of or they can become canceres, please look carefully at your options. Fourty is a lot.
I also obt for quality and not for quantaty.
I wish you well whatever decision you make,
Marjan

You never walk alone

LOUSWIFT
Posts: 372
Joined: Aug 2006

I had colon cancer in 2006 did the radiation/chemo/surgery/chemo and NED for about 4 years then in 2010 colon cancer came back ...smaller tumor but 3 nodes involved. Folfox 6 months and it turns out the chemo damaged by liver so now I have cirrhosis. Gastro doc says good news chemo is out so no more damage. He feels I have somewhere between 2 years and 10 years due to the cirrhosis. I'm 61 and I'll never do chemo again. I have been so sick that I lost 40 lbs and it will take 6 months to a year for me to recover so I can walk a distance and even get up off the floor. Quality of life very important. Good luck Lou

bkeen
Posts: 3
Joined: Jun 2011

Louswift,

I have been on chemo for 8 months. Thinking of stopping the chemo. It is really bad for the liver and the rest of the body. The side effects are crazy. I'm thinking of becoming a vegan have you tried that?

PGLGreg's picture
PGLGreg
Posts: 741
Joined: Jul 2006

Well, of course doctors tend to recommend what is good for most people. Isn't that what they should be doing? Aren't you a person? However, I can think of a possible, conditional, rationale for you not following the recommendation of getting more colon removed. That's a lot of polyps, 40, and your doctor may be making his recommendation on the basis of statistics which include patients who didn't continue with prudent colonoscopies to remove polyps, as they occur. If you're sure that you will continue to have frequent colonoscopies to clip out those polyps that your colon seems to like to raise, maybe your odds for remaining cancer free will be better than typical. At any rate, this might be an issue worth raising with your doctor.

--Greg

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