Radiation with Hormone Therapy-Firmagon

RADIATION HOPEFUL
RADIATION HOPEFUL Member Posts: 218
edited March 2014 in Prostate Cancer #1
Hello Kongo ,VGama & ALL wanting to follow my journey. I took the advice of Kongo & will post my journey on this site.

A few details> Original PSA was 55 , Gleason score of 9. Both Bone scan & MRI were clear-no metastasis. Also had a cystoscopy & confirmed nothing spread to the bladder. Had 3 gold seeds inserted into the prostrate January 12,2011 which will act as a GPS to guide the radiation beam to the prostrate. Latest PSA after two shots of Firmagon was>4.1 Got a third shot in the stomach 0n Jan.26th --in a month I'll see what the new PSA reading is--
hoping it goes to zero especially with the radiation treatments helping it along. The prostrate also shrank & was 17 grams vs. original of 30.

Yesterday -January 28,2011 I was told I will be receiving a wide beam dose of radiation (180 Grey) with 80 concentrated to the prostrate. (I was very concerned with the high dosage & questioned it)This will cover the siminal vesicles & lymph nodes in case any microscopic cells are located there. I was also told-The higher dose to the prostrate alone is to help assure the cancer doesn't return in years to come.
After some research, I accepted it & just for info> according to CURE magazine ---radiation is the NEW surgery without using a knife.
Two sessions were held prior to the start of actual radiation. One was to make a form fitting mold of my upper torso, apply 3 very small tattoos(size of a freckle)to the area being treated again for alignment of the form assuring I'm in the same position every day--similar to a jig if your a machinist.
The second was a simulation run to take X-ray pictures for proper mapping of the beam. Treatment day> you undress in a private room (remove everything from the waist down--you can keep your shirt & shoes on)--I was given a gown & a sheet to wrap around myself due to the open rear. I laid on a table with the VARIAN machine directly above me , the technicians adjusted me via moving the sheet around & adjusted the table to line up all the marks,the body cast was installed & the technicians left the room. They stay behind a 5 ft. thick wall but can talk to me with a microphone etc.-pictures are also on monitors they watch. The machine made two 90 degree arcs on both sides of my body --I didn't feel a thing & it was over (time -less than 10 min.) Forgot to mention I had to drink 16oz. of water prior to start --this helps keep the bladder out of the way. Got up, went to dressing room & left. So far so good--no discomfort but realize this was my first treatment. Hopefully this initial dose killed some of the cancer cells. Cordially
Radiation Hopeful
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Comments

  • Kongo
    Kongo Member Posts: 1,166 Member
    Congratulations
    Hopeful, congratulations on the embarkation of this phase of your battle against prostate cancer. You have gone through an extensive educational and physical preparation and now you have to trust your medical team and the technology they are bringing to bear to treat your cancer. I hope your treatment sessions go smoothly and you come out the other side free of side effects and see many positive indications that all of this effort is curbing your PCa.

    We will all be looking forward to your progress reports.

    Wishing you the very best.

    K
  • VascodaGama
    VascodaGama Member Posts: 3,549 Member
    Kongo said:

    Congratulations
    Hopeful, congratulations on the embarkation of this phase of your battle against prostate cancer. You have gone through an extensive educational and physical preparation and now you have to trust your medical team and the technology they are bringing to bear to treat your cancer. I hope your treatment sessions go smoothly and you come out the other side free of side effects and see many positive indications that all of this effort is curbing your PCa.

    We will all be looking forward to your progress reports.

    Wishing you the very best.

    K

    You are a good example
    RadHope

    Your post is impressive. You serve as a good example of the many that get to this forum frightened by the news of having prostate cancer, confront the situation by educating own self on the problematic theme, and then turn that fear into a source of expertise offered to other fellows in the same situation.

    Along your path you can expect moments of uncertainty but those will turn into occasions of joy and relief that you will remember as milestones in your fight.
    Please keep posting your experiences.

    I wish you a continuous uneventful treatment with successful results.
    VGama.
  • FreddyJoe
    FreddyJoe Member Posts: 45 Member
    Radiation Treatment
    I had a similar treatment well over a year ago. I had the body cast made, the markers inserted and the tattoo dots, and drank a lot of water before the treatment. The object of the water was to keep the bladder full. The machine would move the table slightly if the bladder or bowel was filling and moved the prostate markers. My radiation was non eventfull to me. I left work a little early to get the treatment and kept a fishing rod in the car and fished several times after the treatment before I went home.
    The hormone therapy after that for over a year has had more side effects than the radiation. My last couple of PSA test were zero. I am glad I did not let them talk me into
    surgery.
  • RADIATION HOPEFUL
    RADIATION HOPEFUL Member Posts: 218
    FreddyJoe said:

    Radiation Treatment
    I had a similar treatment well over a year ago. I had the body cast made, the markers inserted and the tattoo dots, and drank a lot of water before the treatment. The object of the water was to keep the bladder full. The machine would move the table slightly if the bladder or bowel was filling and moved the prostate markers. My radiation was non eventfull to me. I left work a little early to get the treatment and kept a fishing rod in the car and fished several times after the treatment before I went home.
    The hormone therapy after that for over a year has had more side effects than the radiation. My last couple of PSA test were zero. I am glad I did not let them talk me into
    surgery.

    Treatment
    Hello Freddy Joe & Thanks for the reply & experience you encountered--your outcome is FANTASTIC. May you keep the PSA at zero the rest of your life. What Hormone therapy are you on? Do you know how much radiation (dose)you were given?
    Would you mind informing me about some of your statistics? My E-mail address is in my original post if you do not want to post personal info.

    Freddy Joe>
    After considerable research, I chose radiation over surgery for several reasons. One of them was I want to go after the ROOT CAUSE of the problem, that is the radical cells that turned cancerous. Hopefully by killing them since they are much weaker than normal cells,& this can be done several ways-radiation being one of them. Hopefully the normal cells can eventually take over which is what appears to have happened with your treatment. I respect everyone for their chosen treatment of choice & pray all can recover from this disease.
    Looking forward to more posts.

    ALSO THANK YOU to everyone that posts replies (Kongo,VGama etc.)----they are all very uplifting giving support & advice which is appreciated. "BLESS everyone"


    Rad Hopeful
  • RADIATION HOPEFUL
    RADIATION HOPEFUL Member Posts: 218

    Treatment
    Hello Freddy Joe & Thanks for the reply & experience you encountered--your outcome is FANTASTIC. May you keep the PSA at zero the rest of your life. What Hormone therapy are you on? Do you know how much radiation (dose)you were given?
    Would you mind informing me about some of your statistics? My E-mail address is in my original post if you do not want to post personal info.

    Freddy Joe>
    After considerable research, I chose radiation over surgery for several reasons. One of them was I want to go after the ROOT CAUSE of the problem, that is the radical cells that turned cancerous. Hopefully by killing them since they are much weaker than normal cells,& this can be done several ways-radiation being one of them. Hopefully the normal cells can eventually take over which is what appears to have happened with your treatment. I respect everyone for their chosen treatment of choice & pray all can recover from this disease.
    Looking forward to more posts.

    ALSO THANK YOU to everyone that posts replies (Kongo,VGama etc.)----they are all very uplifting giving support & advice which is appreciated. "BLESS everyone"


    Rad Hopeful

    Second day of treatment
    All --second day of treatment similar to first only the Varian radiation machine made two 180 degree arcs on each side of my body. When completed , I asked the rad technician if I had enough water in my bladder to keep it away from the rad beam. She told me they can't tell where the bladder is lying that I should just drink the same amount of water each day at least 1/2 hour prior to treatment.
    Guess I just follow her recommendation & hope for the best. Each day there are new technicians involved with my treatment, I would like some consistency but have no choice.

    Rad Hopeful
  • FreddyJoe
    FreddyJoe Member Posts: 45 Member

    Treatment
    Hello Freddy Joe & Thanks for the reply & experience you encountered--your outcome is FANTASTIC. May you keep the PSA at zero the rest of your life. What Hormone therapy are you on? Do you know how much radiation (dose)you were given?
    Would you mind informing me about some of your statistics? My E-mail address is in my original post if you do not want to post personal info.

    Freddy Joe>
    After considerable research, I chose radiation over surgery for several reasons. One of them was I want to go after the ROOT CAUSE of the problem, that is the radical cells that turned cancerous. Hopefully by killing them since they are much weaker than normal cells,& this can be done several ways-radiation being one of them. Hopefully the normal cells can eventually take over which is what appears to have happened with your treatment. I respect everyone for their chosen treatment of choice & pray all can recover from this disease.
    Looking forward to more posts.

    ALSO THANK YOU to everyone that posts replies (Kongo,VGama etc.)----they are all very uplifting giving support & advice which is appreciated. "BLESS everyone"


    Rad Hopeful

    Treatment
    I really did not pay much attention to the numbers at the time. I do not know what the Gleason Scores were. And I am not sure of the radiation dose. I was sort of in denial about the whole thing until recently. I had no symptoms that I knew of, and was shocked when they said my PSA was so high and that I should have a biopsy ASAP. They had support group meetings and I refused to go, and it was not bothering me in the least. I am on Eligard and after several months of it, I began to have some of the usual side effects, and that is when I started the research and found this forum. I am scheduled for what they say should be my last injection of the stuff in about a week, and may try to talk the Dr out of it or changing to another one. My thought was, since it did not bother me before I found about it and it was only in the prostate that I did not want them cutting on me, so I got the radiation and I am quite happy with the results, compared to what I hear from some who have had surgery.
  • Kongo
    Kongo Member Posts: 1,166 Member

    Second day of treatment
    All --second day of treatment similar to first only the Varian radiation machine made two 180 degree arcs on each side of my body. When completed , I asked the rad technician if I had enough water in my bladder to keep it away from the rad beam. She told me they can't tell where the bladder is lying that I should just drink the same amount of water each day at least 1/2 hour prior to treatment.
    Guess I just follow her recommendation & hope for the best. Each day there are new technicians involved with my treatment, I would like some consistency but have no choice.

    Rad Hopeful

    Radiation Plan
    Hopeful,

    When I went through my treatments I had the same team, there were two of them, and sometimes one was there or the other. The important thing is that they are following an approved radiation plan which has been made specially for you. Building the radiation plan involves a radiation physicist, a dose physicist, your board certified radiologist, and the doctor who is supervising your overall treatment. In my case they developed a 3-D image that they showed me and it highlighted the areas in the anatomy that were getting which dose levels and how they were avoiding certain other areas.

    The next time you go in for treatment, ask them to show you the plan and how they verify everything is set up right so that it doesn't realy make much difference which technician is pushing the buttons.

    Best,

    K
  • RADIATION HOPEFUL
    RADIATION HOPEFUL Member Posts: 218
    Kongo said:

    Radiation Plan
    Hopeful,

    When I went through my treatments I had the same team, there were two of them, and sometimes one was there or the other. The important thing is that they are following an approved radiation plan which has been made specially for you. Building the radiation plan involves a radiation physicist, a dose physicist, your board certified radiologist, and the doctor who is supervising your overall treatment. In my case they developed a 3-D image that they showed me and it highlighted the areas in the anatomy that were getting which dose levels and how they were avoiding certain other areas.

    The next time you go in for treatment, ask them to show you the plan and how they verify everything is set up right so that it doesn't realy make much difference which technician is pushing the buttons.

    Best,

    K

    Rad Plan
    Hello Kongo & THANKS for the post

    FYI> I DO NOT see anyone but the three lady technicians each day. I would love to see the actual plan but was told it was mapped out after x-rays were taken. I'm being treated at a local hospital which has a Cancer center & rely on their expertise. The radiation oncologist I spoke to before the treatments started had very good credentials & I'm more or less relying on her expertise. Providing I get to see her again, I'll ask for a description of the areas being treated. I did call & asked about the high dose of 180grey & she did call me back to inform me they planned a broad beam rad treatment due to the original high PSA & Gleason score.
    I appreciate your post--once again you are giving good advice & food for thought. It appears you were treated at a very good cancer center.

    Rad Hopeful
  • RADIATION HOPEFUL
    RADIATION HOPEFUL Member Posts: 218
    FreddyJoe said:

    Treatment
    I really did not pay much attention to the numbers at the time. I do not know what the Gleason Scores were. And I am not sure of the radiation dose. I was sort of in denial about the whole thing until recently. I had no symptoms that I knew of, and was shocked when they said my PSA was so high and that I should have a biopsy ASAP. They had support group meetings and I refused to go, and it was not bothering me in the least. I am on Eligard and after several months of it, I began to have some of the usual side effects, and that is when I started the research and found this forum. I am scheduled for what they say should be my last injection of the stuff in about a week, and may try to talk the Dr out of it or changing to another one. My thought was, since it did not bother me before I found about it and it was only in the prostate that I did not want them cutting on me, so I got the radiation and I am quite happy with the results, compared to what I hear from some who have had surgery.

    Treatment
    Thanks for the reply Freddy Joe

    FYI>My urologist wanted to change from Firmagon to Eligard but I requested to stay on the Firmagon monthly shots. I read some terrible side affects from the ELigard vs. the Firmagon & didn't want to face unknown issues while going through radiation treatments. The reason for the switch I was told --that a 4 month shot is available with Eligard rather than coming in monthly. My urologist isn't in the same hospital where my radiation oncologist resides thus I don't know how this may affect my treatment.
    I'm VERY HAPPY to hear your end result & hope I can achieve similar results.
    I'm sure you heard >We are all snowflakes & as such everyone chose their form of treatment based on their own research/reasoning. So far I'm glad I chose the radiation treatment especially after hearing your end result. Thank you for the reply, I truly appreciate it.

    Rad Hopeful
  • VascodaGama
    VascodaGama Member Posts: 3,549 Member

    Treatment
    Thanks for the reply Freddy Joe

    FYI>My urologist wanted to change from Firmagon to Eligard but I requested to stay on the Firmagon monthly shots. I read some terrible side affects from the ELigard vs. the Firmagon & didn't want to face unknown issues while going through radiation treatments. The reason for the switch I was told --that a 4 month shot is available with Eligard rather than coming in monthly. My urologist isn't in the same hospital where my radiation oncologist resides thus I don't know how this may affect my treatment.
    I'm VERY HAPPY to hear your end result & hope I can achieve similar results.
    I'm sure you heard >We are all snowflakes & as such everyone chose their form of treatment based on their own research/reasoning. So far I'm glad I chose the radiation treatment especially after hearing your end result. Thank you for the reply, I truly appreciate it.

    Rad Hopeful

    RadHope; Schedule of Firmagon
    Hi RadHope,
    I like to read about your progress. You shouldn’t be concerned if your urologist is in a different hospital. Firmagon can be given to you also at your radiotherapy clinic. Just certify the matter with your doctor or, if you prefer to be followed by your urologist, mark the date in your calendar and call him a few days in advance.
    The treatment at your local clinic also includes an identical team of physicists as described by Kongo. You can rely on your radiation oncologist and you should request an appointment if you want to clarify anything along your progress, or report about any symptom.
    The daily Gys will differ as per treatment area. However, it is new to me to hear of 180Gys. It is more likely 80 Gys (?) as you mentioned in another thread.
    In my case (no prostate) I had 68Gys in 37 sections.

    I wish you a continuous uneventful progress.
    VGama
  • RADIATION HOPEFUL
    RADIATION HOPEFUL Member Posts: 218

    RadHope; Schedule of Firmagon
    Hi RadHope,
    I like to read about your progress. You shouldn’t be concerned if your urologist is in a different hospital. Firmagon can be given to you also at your radiotherapy clinic. Just certify the matter with your doctor or, if you prefer to be followed by your urologist, mark the date in your calendar and call him a few days in advance.
    The treatment at your local clinic also includes an identical team of physicists as described by Kongo. You can rely on your radiation oncologist and you should request an appointment if you want to clarify anything along your progress, or report about any symptom.
    The daily Gys will differ as per treatment area. However, it is new to me to hear of 180Gys. It is more likely 80 Gys (?) as you mentioned in another thread.
    In my case (no prostate) I had 68Gys in 37 sections.

    I wish you a continuous uneventful progress.
    VGama

    Treatment & dose of Radition
    VGama
    Thanks for the post--as noted earlier I did question the radiation oncologist about>180grey & was told the high dose is due to my high Gleason Score & psa reading -it will be a wide beam radiation to cover vesiles & lymph glands---80 will be going to the prostrate itself.
    I'm somewhat concerned even after this explanation. Last evening I had pain in my hip & I can only assume it was from the radiation. I sure don't want bone problems on top of what I'm facing. Never had pain in my hip until this treatment? If I press on the hip bone I can feel the pain--right side only.
    The MRI & bone scan showed clear-no evidence of metatasis.Plus the Bladder was clear -confirmed via a spectoscopy exam.
    WE have a snow/ice storm this morning, all the schools are closed but I will try & get to the hospital for my treatment. (I want to let them know about the hip pain I experienced)

    Hope things go better today & Thanks again for the post
    RadHopeful
  • Mark58
    Mark58 Member Posts: 41

    Treatment & dose of Radition
    VGama
    Thanks for the post--as noted earlier I did question the radiation oncologist about>180grey & was told the high dose is due to my high Gleason Score & psa reading -it will be a wide beam radiation to cover vesiles & lymph glands---80 will be going to the prostrate itself.
    I'm somewhat concerned even after this explanation. Last evening I had pain in my hip & I can only assume it was from the radiation. I sure don't want bone problems on top of what I'm facing. Never had pain in my hip until this treatment? If I press on the hip bone I can feel the pain--right side only.
    The MRI & bone scan showed clear-no evidence of metatasis.Plus the Bladder was clear -confirmed via a spectoscopy exam.
    WE have a snow/ice storm this morning, all the schools are closed but I will try & get to the hospital for my treatment. (I want to let them know about the hip pain I experienced)

    Hope things go better today & Thanks again for the post
    RadHopeful

    Radiation Dose
    You are probably receiving 180 centigreys (180 Rads) per day total with portions of that total going to specific areas. That's what I received. Now, mine was a salvage situation, but still, a centigrey is equivalent to the old Rad unit of radiation measurement (1 Rad = 0.01 Grey or 1 centigrey. Ask your radiation oncologist. I don't think you would want to receive 180 greys in one day. That would be more than 3 times the annual (whole body) dose limit for a radiation worker. That could be dangerous.
  • RADIATION HOPEFUL
    RADIATION HOPEFUL Member Posts: 218
    Mark58 said:

    Radiation Dose
    You are probably receiving 180 centigreys (180 Rads) per day total with portions of that total going to specific areas. That's what I received. Now, mine was a salvage situation, but still, a centigrey is equivalent to the old Rad unit of radiation measurement (1 Rad = 0.01 Grey or 1 centigrey. Ask your radiation oncologist. I don't think you would want to receive 180 greys in one day. That would be more than 3 times the annual (whole body) dose limit for a radiation worker. That could be dangerous.

    Radiation Dose
    Hello Mark58

    Thanks for the info---you are correct it's 180 centigreys with 80 going to the prostrate. I had my third treatment this morning & questioned the dose etc. I was told I will be receiving 25 treatments with the broad beam radiation & the last 19 with the conformed style. Only 41 more treatments to go, should be done when spring arrives.

    Rad Hopeful
  • VascodaGama
    VascodaGama Member Posts: 3,549 Member

    Radiation Dose
    Hello Mark58

    Thanks for the info---you are correct it's 180 centigreys with 80 going to the prostrate. I had my third treatment this morning & questioned the dose etc. I was told I will be receiving 25 treatments with the broad beam radiation & the last 19 with the conformed style. Only 41 more treatments to go, should be done when spring arrives.

    Rad Hopeful

    Thanks Mark for clearing the rad measurement
    RadHope

    Yes, no cancer but flowers, that’s what you can expect for spring.
    Some guys experience pain in the spine or muscle due to the strict positioning in the mold during treatment. Without noticing we are nervous and tense, and that cause a variety of symptoms.
    Nevertheless you should tell the staff about the matter and get a satisfying answer. Radiation does not hurt or cause damage is such low doses (1.80Gy) at the pelvic area. Usually symptoms, if any, become apparent on the 5th week. Shoveling snow could be the cause of the pain too.
    Do not worry. Think that each time you are under radiation some of the “cancer cells” are being killed. Soon all is part of the past.
    Thanks Mark for clearing the rad measurement. My sections were also similarly of 1.7Gy.

    Wishing you both good prognoses.
    VGama
  • FreddyJoe
    FreddyJoe Member Posts: 45 Member

    Thanks Mark for clearing the rad measurement
    RadHope

    Yes, no cancer but flowers, that’s what you can expect for spring.
    Some guys experience pain in the spine or muscle due to the strict positioning in the mold during treatment. Without noticing we are nervous and tense, and that cause a variety of symptoms.
    Nevertheless you should tell the staff about the matter and get a satisfying answer. Radiation does not hurt or cause damage is such low doses (1.80Gy) at the pelvic area. Usually symptoms, if any, become apparent on the 5th week. Shoveling snow could be the cause of the pain too.
    Do not worry. Think that each time you are under radiation some of the “cancer cells” are being killed. Soon all is part of the past.
    Thanks Mark for clearing the rad measurement. My sections were also similarly of 1.7Gy.

    Wishing you both good prognoses.
    VGama

    Radiation Pain
    I do not understand the pain either. I had 44 of these treatments, working standing on my feet all day during and after the treatment with no pain. During my treatment we had a weekly visit with the Dr., but he was not in the room during the treatments.
  • FreddyJoe
    FreddyJoe Member Posts: 45 Member

    Thanks Mark for clearing the rad measurement
    RadHope

    Yes, no cancer but flowers, that’s what you can expect for spring.
    Some guys experience pain in the spine or muscle due to the strict positioning in the mold during treatment. Without noticing we are nervous and tense, and that cause a variety of symptoms.
    Nevertheless you should tell the staff about the matter and get a satisfying answer. Radiation does not hurt or cause damage is such low doses (1.80Gy) at the pelvic area. Usually symptoms, if any, become apparent on the 5th week. Shoveling snow could be the cause of the pain too.
    Do not worry. Think that each time you are under radiation some of the “cancer cells” are being killed. Soon all is part of the past.
    Thanks Mark for clearing the rad measurement. My sections were also similarly of 1.7Gy.

    Wishing you both good prognoses.
    VGama

    Radiation Pain
    Deleted- the computer posted it twice.
  • RADIATION HOPEFUL
    RADIATION HOPEFUL Member Posts: 218
    FreddyJoe said:

    Radiation Pain
    Deleted- the computer posted it twice.

    NO Radiation Pain
    Thanks everyone for the posts

    First >I apologize for the misunderstanding of the dosage grey to centigrey--quite a difference. (Thanks to Mark58)

    Second> The pain I experienced was from bumping into the snow plow not the radiation

    Third> Yesterday I had my third treatment & noticed the rad machine (Varian) made a complete 360 degree circle. The first treatment it made 90 degree arcs on each side of my body & the second made 180 degree arcs each side. I questioned this & was told I'm receiving the same treatment each day. I'm still wondering why the difference in rotation each day?
    Today will be my 4th treatment if I can get in --we had a ice storm last night, my spouting is a solid ice cube & the water is backing up under the shingles. I must clear the overhang & spouting as soon as I can. Thank goodness I'm still feeling "OK" to perform said task.
    4th Treatment today --Machine made a 360 arc. The tech informed me they can't control the way the machine delivers the dose but it's supposedly the same every day.
    Bless you EVERYONE that is supplying info & hope as I venture into this treatment.


    Rad Hopeful
  • 2ndBase
    2ndBase Member Posts: 220
    Radiation
    My starting psa was 24 and Gleason 9. I took one shot of Lupron to shrink the prostate and then received the maximum dose allowed of radiation over the next couple months. I was 52 when diagnosed. My psa dropped to .17 after treatment. The treatment killed all the cancer cells in my prostate. This was confirmed by another biopsy 4 years later. Unfortunately the cancer had already spread, this was assumed, and now almost 8 years later I am in hospice care with many tumors on spine and other bones throughout my body. My hospice oncologist was at my house last week and explained how it all works and told me what to expect when the end comes. Hospice has done a very good job in controlling my pain and believe me it is not easy to do. I do hope your cancer has not spread at all and you have a long and full life. In my case it was somewhat disappointing to find out that the radiation had killed all the cancer in my prostate because that, along with a rising psa meant the cancer was thriving somewhere else. I had hoped to find a little cancer left in the prostate and then we were going to freeze what was left. Anyway the radiation did what it was supposed to do and I hope you have total success. It seems to me with my radiation that it was not the same every day as far as location and dosage of radiation but it was done well and it did all it could do. All the best.
  • RADIATION HOPEFUL
    RADIATION HOPEFUL Member Posts: 218
    2ndBase said:

    Radiation
    My starting psa was 24 and Gleason 9. I took one shot of Lupron to shrink the prostate and then received the maximum dose allowed of radiation over the next couple months. I was 52 when diagnosed. My psa dropped to .17 after treatment. The treatment killed all the cancer cells in my prostate. This was confirmed by another biopsy 4 years later. Unfortunately the cancer had already spread, this was assumed, and now almost 8 years later I am in hospice care with many tumors on spine and other bones throughout my body. My hospice oncologist was at my house last week and explained how it all works and told me what to expect when the end comes. Hospice has done a very good job in controlling my pain and believe me it is not easy to do. I do hope your cancer has not spread at all and you have a long and full life. In my case it was somewhat disappointing to find out that the radiation had killed all the cancer in my prostate because that, along with a rising psa meant the cancer was thriving somewhere else. I had hoped to find a little cancer left in the prostate and then we were going to freeze what was left. Anyway the radiation did what it was supposed to do and I hope you have total success. It seems to me with my radiation that it was not the same every day as far as location and dosage of radiation but it was done well and it did all it could do. All the best.

    2nd Base
    2nd Base

    Sorry to hear your outcome after radiation, I guess my question is if your doctor noticed the rising PSA after treatments why wasn't anything done to control it? Can you tell me what year you had this treatment done--was it back in 2002? Weren't you monitored as you were receiving radiation treatments?
    Todays technology is using a broad beam radiation approach to try & capture any microscopic cells that may have escaped from the prostrate.
    Do you know if you had the broad beam treatments. I ask this based on your post that 8 years have passed & you are now in Hospice.
    It's good to see you enjoyed 8 years but the end result isn't pleasant. Thank you for the well wishes --I send the same to you > Isn't there anything else that can be done to save you?
    Bless you in your struggle --wishing you the best

    Rad Hopeful
  • RADIATION HOPEFUL
    RADIATION HOPEFUL Member Posts: 218

    Thanks Mark for clearing the rad measurement
    RadHope

    Yes, no cancer but flowers, that’s what you can expect for spring.
    Some guys experience pain in the spine or muscle due to the strict positioning in the mold during treatment. Without noticing we are nervous and tense, and that cause a variety of symptoms.
    Nevertheless you should tell the staff about the matter and get a satisfying answer. Radiation does not hurt or cause damage is such low doses (1.80Gy) at the pelvic area. Usually symptoms, if any, become apparent on the 5th week. Shoveling snow could be the cause of the pain too.
    Do not worry. Think that each time you are under radiation some of the “cancer cells” are being killed. Soon all is part of the past.
    Thanks Mark for clearing the rad measurement. My sections were also similarly of 1.7Gy.

    Wishing you both good prognoses.
    VGama

    Rad Dose
    Hello VGama & Thanks again for the reply

    I did some quick calculations on the dosage & would like your opinion

    If 1 Rad equals 0.01 grey or 1 centigrey----.01 times the 180 centigrey dose times the 44 treatments equals 79.2 Grey (TOTAL)----- & 44% of the daily dose goes to the prostrate> .44 times 79.2 equal only 35 to the prostrate.

    But I must remember I'm receiving 25 treatments (broad beam) & the last 19 focused on the prostrate --perhaps it all works out.

    I value your opinion & look forward to a reply

    Bless all afficted with this demon

    Rad Hopeful