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Something Great on the Horizon

yesyes2
Posts: 592
Joined: Jul 2009

Okay, this is just what I heared on the radio news as I was driving home from Costco. According to the report, Stanford University scientists have just identified the gene in the cancer cells which will turn the cells on to our own immunsystem, allowing the immunsystem to kill the cell. No chemo, no radiation necessary. I can only hope that this turns out to be true and a cure could be on the horizon for all cancers in our lifetime. Alas sometimes news reports are not accurate.

What a Happy New Year that would be. Let me know if anyone has any other information on this.

Leslie

COBRA666's picture
COBRA666
Posts: 2413
Joined: May 2010

Leslie,
All I can say is it would be so nice if that turns out to be true. I relly think they are getting close to a cure. They are making bigs steps in the last few years. Just keep our fingers crossed. John(FNHL-1-4A-5/10)

allmost60's picture
allmost60
Posts: 3184
Joined: Jul 2010

I found this article..(just published today) that you might find interesting. I believe good things will come for us....Love...Sue
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December 22, 2010 Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have discovered that many cancer cells carry the seeds of their own destruction — a protein on the cell surface that signals circulating immune cells to engulf and digest them. On cancer cells, this "eat me" signal is counteracted by a separate "don't eat me" signal that was described in an earlier study. The two discoveries may lead to better cancer therapies, and also solve a mystery about why a previously reported cancer therapy is not more toxic.
In the study to be published Dec. 22 in Science Translational Medicine, the researchers discovered that many forms of cancer display the protein calreticulin, or CRT, which invites immune cells called macrophages to engulf and destroy them. The reason most cancer cells are not destroyed by macrophages is that they also display another molecule, a "don't eat me" signal, called CD47, which counteracts the CRT signal.

The characterization of the function of CD47 protein in cancer was previously published by the Stanford scientists. In the earlier work, they reported that an antibody that blocks CD47 could be a potent anti-cancer therapy. They demonstrated that the anti-CD47 antibody could eliminate disease in mice transplanted with human acute myeloid leukemia and cure a large proportion of mice with human non-Hodgkin's lymphoma when combined with a second antibody.

Although the result was exciting, it presented a couple mysteries. "Many normal cells in the body have CD47, and yet those cells are not affected by the anti-CD47 antibody," said Mark Chao, a Stanford MD/PhD candidate who is first author of the new paper. "At that time, we knew that anti-CD47 antibody treatment selectively killed only cancer cells without being toxic to most normal cells, although we didn't know why."

The researchers also questioned whether simply blocking CD47 would be enough to bring on a cell's destruction. "It wouldn't be likely that killing cells was the default action of the immune system," said Ravindra Majeti, MD, PhD, assistant professor of hematology and co-principal investigator on the project. "We postulated that there had to be an 'eat me' signal that the cancer cells were also carrying in addition to CD47." CRT became the leading candidate for this signal because other researchers had previously shown that CRT and CD47 work together to govern a process of programmed cell death called apoptosis.

Indeed, when the scientists looked for CRT they found it on a variety of cancers, including several leukemias, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and bladder, brain and ovarian cancers. "This research demonstrates that the reason that blocking the CD47 'don't eat me' signal works to kill cancer is that leukemias, lymphomas and many solid tumors also display a calreticulin 'eat me' signal," said Irving Weissman, MD, director of the Stanford Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine and the study's other co-principal investigator. "The research also shows that most normal cell populations don't display calreticulin and are therefore not depleted when we expose them to a blocking anti-CD47 antibody."

yesyes2
Posts: 592
Joined: Jul 2009

Much appreciate the article. I looked for something published today and didn't turn any thing up. Good for you to find it for us. Where did you see it?

Thanks,
Leslie

allmost60's picture
allmost60
Posts: 3184
Joined: Jul 2010

physorg.com...Leslie.
Love...Sue

COBRA666's picture
COBRA666
Posts: 2413
Joined: May 2010

Leslie,
Don't you know by now Sue can find a needle in a haystack. HAHAHA John

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