CSN Login
Members Online: 2

You are here

Multivitamin Use Doesn't Impact Colon Cancer Outcomes, Study Finds

Nana b's picture
Nana b
Posts: 3045
Joined: May 2009

ScienceDaily (Sep. 7, 2010) — Patients with colon cancer who used multivitamins during and after being treated with post-surgical chemotherapy did not reduce the risk of the cancer returning or their dying from it, according to researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.
See Also:
Health & Medicine

* Colon Cancer
* Lung Cancer
* Breast Cancer
* Leukemia
* Cancer
* Ovarian Cancer

Reference

* Metastasis
* Tumor suppressor gene
* Nanomedicine
* Stomach cancer

In a study of patients with stage III colon cancer -- characterized as cancer in the large bowel area with some cancer cells in a few nearby lymph nodes -- the researchers found that while multivitamin use had no beneficial effect on patients' outcomes, it also did not have a detrimental effect. The findings are reported online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology and later will be published in a print edition.

Kimmie Ng, MD, MPH, the paper's first author and a gastrointestinal oncologist at Dana-Farber, said that despite conflicting evidence on the efficacy of multivitamins to reduce cancer risk and death, studies suggest that approximately 30 percent of Americans take multivitamins to prevent and treat chronic diseases such as cancer. Among cancer survivors, between 26 and 77 percent report using multivitamins.

"With such a high proportion of cancer patients utilizing multivitamin supplements in the belief that it will help them fight their cancer, we felt it was important to really examine the data to see what impact multivitamins had on cancer recurrence and survival," said Ng.

The researchers used two questionnaires to track multivitamin use during and after chemotherapy. Of the 1,038 patients who completed the first survey, nearly half (518) responded they used multivitamins while receiving chemotherapy. Of the 810 cancer-free patients who completed the second survey six months after chemotherapy, more than half (416) reported multivitamin use.

Ng and her colleagues found no statistically significant differences in the rates of disease-free survival (the study's primary endpoint), recurrence-free survival, or overall survival between those who used multivitamins and those who didn't.

They also determined that an array of factors, including socio-economic status, household income, multivitamin and individual vitamin dosage, and consistency of multivitamin use did not impact their findings.

However, they did find a small beneficial association between age and weight and the use of multivitamins while receiving chemotherapy. Those 60 and younger experienced some survival benefit, as did obese patients. There were no benefits for either subgroup when the multivitamins were taken after chemotherapy was completed. Ng said additional studies are needed to confirm their findings and to investigate whether there were other factors that influenced the outcomes.

"This study adds to a growing body of research that questions the purported benefit of multivitamin use, and it underscores the need to investigate the use of individual vitamins, such as vitamin D, which may, in fact, provide real benefit," said Charles Fuchs, MD, director of gastrointestinal oncology at Dana-Farber and the paper's senior author. He noted that the average multivitamin typically contains only a small to modest amount of vitamin D.

The study was funded in part by the National Cancer Institute and by an American Society of Clinical Oncology Young Investigator Award.

In addition to Ng and Fuchs, the other authors are Jeffrey A. Meyerhardt, MD, MPH, Jennifer Chan, MD, and Robert J. Mayer, MD, Dana-Farber; Donna Niedzwiecki, PhD, and Donna R. Hollis, BS, Duke University; Leonard Saltz, MD, Memorial Sloane Kettering Cancer Center; Al B. Benson, III, MD, Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago; Paul L. Schaefer, MD, Toledo Community Hospital Oncology Program, Toledo, OH; Renaud Whittom, MD, Hôpital du Sácre-Coeur de Montréal; Alexander Hantel, MD, Edward Cancer Center, Naperville, IL; and Richard M. Goldberg, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, N.C.
Email or share this story:
| More

Story Source:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100907113042.htm

******

I don't take a multi vitamin but do take individual supplements. Actually, I believe I did take the multi vitamin during chemo, and then stopped when I found out it had folic acid.

KathiM's picture
KathiM
Posts: 8077
Joined: Aug 2005

I didn't take anything without her knowing about it (including green tea, with antioxidents...she was against it...this was 5 years ago...).

But now, I include a multi vitamin each day, along with eating well. Fresh fruits and vegies, low fat, only small amounts of 'throw away' calories (like french fries...ROFL...the Dutch make the MOST yummy 'frites'...mmmmmm!).

Thanks for the article!

Hugs, Kathi

John23's picture
John23
Posts: 2140
Joined: Jan 2007

Factory made multi-vitamins and supplements don't contain the
enzyms, nutrients, or protiens that the natural product contains.

You can't fool momma nature!

John

Anonymous user (not verified)

This comment has been removed by the Moderator

John23's picture
John23
Posts: 2140
Joined: Jan 2007

Sitting in the sun for 15 minutes will cause your
body to generate all the vitamin D you'll need.

"approximately 5-30 minutes of sun exposure between 10 AM and 3 PM
at least twice a week to the face, arms, legs, or back without
sunscreen usually lead to sufficient vitamin D synthesis "

From: http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/vitamind.asp

Sometimes we make living so damned complicated when living
should be so damned natural to us.

John

Anonymous user (not verified)

This comment has been removed by the Moderator

coloCan
Posts: 1956
Joined: Oct 2009

to my diet, NEVER as a possible preventor or cure for cancer at all. Too many vitamins/minerals taken in pill form rather via foodstuffs will help your tumor more than your health.....Even now, won't take nothing without onc's approval first......steve

Babs:do you drink stuff like Boost,Ensure, CVS Plus nutrition drinks in addition to food? Might help with weight.....

Anonymous user (not verified)

This comment has been removed by the Moderator

Nana b's picture
Nana b
Posts: 3045
Joined: May 2009

My 100 year grandmother lives on Ensure....and blended up food. Her body does not have to work too hard to digest any of her food. The lady is healthier then most of us! She swears a shot of Aloa Vera each day!

What about eating bananas daily, they are recommended for helping with diarrhea. Peanut butter, smoothies, anything with some calories, that isn't too unhealthy.

I have been eating healthy and gaining weight, too much weight, so now I have started counting my calories.

Hope you find something that helps!

Anonymous user (not verified)

This comment has been removed by the Moderator

Nana b's picture
Nana b
Posts: 3045
Joined: May 2009

Aloe vera is one of the only known natural vegetarian sources of Vitamin B12, and it contains many minerals vital to the growth process and healthy function of all the body's systems. Numerous studies worldwide indicate that aloe vera is a general tonic for the immune system, helping it to fight illness of all kinds. Various research studies are underway to explore the potential of aloe vera components to boost immunity and combat the HIV virus, and to treat certain types of cancer (particularly leukemia). It may even have a role to play in managing diabetes.

Over 200 worldwide scientific research papers have been published on the effects of Aloe vera. The three main categories of research include anti-inflammatory, anti- bacterial, and anti-viral actions of Aloe vera. The juice is said to soothe digestive tract irritations such as colitis, ulcers and irritable bowel syndrome. Aloe's ability to encourage the release of pepsin (a gastric juice enzyme necessary for digestion) when the stomach is full is a possible reason for its ulcer-healing effects (Journal of the American Osteopathic Society, 1963, vol.62). In one study, oral use of Aloe for six months helped mitigate asthma symptoms in almost half of the participants. Eleven of twenty-seven patients studied who drank Aloe reported feeling better at the end of the study. Researchers think that results might be due to stimulation of the immune system, as well as naturally occurring anti-inflammatory agents in Aloe vera.

http://www.herbwisdom.com/herb-aloe-vera.html

Nana b's picture
Nana b
Posts: 3045
Joined: May 2009

I take forever aloe...

https://www.foreverliving.com/marketing/Home.do

PS...I am not endorsing it. :)

Anonymous user (not verified)

This comment has been removed by the Moderator

KathiM's picture
KathiM
Posts: 8077
Joined: Aug 2005

I'm one of two people on the entire PLANET that is allergic to Aloe Vera. Double blind study....including one luscious bottle of cranberry/fluiberry drink...after a few sips, I wanted to know what made it taste so good...probably the Aloe...my sinuses let me know, and I took some antihistimines...

Hugs, Kathi

nudgie's picture
nudgie
Posts: 1483
Joined: Sep 2006

a multi-vitamin, but years before receiving my DX in 2006, I began incorporating Caltrate 600D which is a Calcium + Vit D supplement. I never stopped taking my vitamins and actually added two additional ones once I got back into weight lifting due to the physical activity.

DAILY VITAMINS - AM
Women's One-A-Day w/Calcium

DAILY VITAMINS - PM
Caltrate 600 D
Folic Acid
Protein shakes 3 X weekly

Anonymous user (not verified)

This comment has been removed by the Moderator

Subscribe to Comments for "Multivitamin Use Doesn't Impact Colon Cancer Outcomes, Study Finds"