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Husband dx yesterday

TLG320
TLG320 Member Posts: 167
edited March 2014 in Colorectal Cancer #1
My 42 year old husband has been diagnosed with Colon Cancer. We met with the gastrointerologist and surgeon yesterday. The CT scans indicate that the cancer is isolated to the colon - there are no indications of cancer in any other organs or the lymph nodes at this time - I'm praying the pathology reports say the same after the surgery. He's been scheduled for surgery on November 9. The surgeon is not going to do the surgery laproscopically. He is going to remove a part of the small intestine, the appendix and part of the colon.

I go from being upbeat and positive, to being terrified, to sad - I don't know how I'm going to be able to focus these next few weeks. What questions should I be asking? What should we expect these next few weeks? Any advice and prayers would be greatly appreciated. Thanks for your support!

Scared Wife
Baltimore, MD.

Comments

  • dianetavegia
    dianetavegia Member Posts: 1,942
    HI TLG
    I'm sorry to hear about your husband. Stage III is curable. :o) Almost 50% are cured by surgery alone. I was dx'd Stage III on Jan. 2nd with surgery on Jan. 7th 2009. My chemo ended on Aug. 12th. :o)

    Your hubby will not begin chemo for 5 or 6 weeks after his surgery. That's so he can heal up because chemo affects healing. During this time, have hubby get to the dentist for a cleaning and X-Rays. Dental work during chemo can be very, very dangerous.

    Hubby will have a port inserted into his upper chest. No big deal. It allows chemo to be given via that instead of through the veins.

    Hubby will have chemo every 2 weeks for a total of 12 treatments. He'll wear home a fanny pack pump for 46 hours. Chemo takes about half a day and doesn't hurt. It does cause neuropathy that can last for a year after chemo ends, or forever. It also causes some people to have nausea and almost everyone feels like they've crashed after the pump is disconnected. Chemo on Wed. with disconnect on Friday allows hubby to rest over the weekend.


    BTW... our 39 year old son and family live in Baltimore and attend Eastern AOG. Scott is one of the managers at the Tweeter store in Towsend. His wife teaches at the local college. Scott has Celiac Syndrome (a colon issue that puts him at a much higher risk for co)

    I will gladly pray for both of you!

    Diane
  • TLG320
    TLG320 Member Posts: 167

    HI TLG
    I'm sorry to hear about your husband. Stage III is curable. :o) Almost 50% are cured by surgery alone. I was dx'd Stage III on Jan. 2nd with surgery on Jan. 7th 2009. My chemo ended on Aug. 12th. :o)

    Your hubby will not begin chemo for 5 or 6 weeks after his surgery. That's so he can heal up because chemo affects healing. During this time, have hubby get to the dentist for a cleaning and X-Rays. Dental work during chemo can be very, very dangerous.

    Hubby will have a port inserted into his upper chest. No big deal. It allows chemo to be given via that instead of through the veins.

    Hubby will have chemo every 2 weeks for a total of 12 treatments. He'll wear home a fanny pack pump for 46 hours. Chemo takes about half a day and doesn't hurt. It does cause neuropathy that can last for a year after chemo ends, or forever. It also causes some people to have nausea and almost everyone feels like they've crashed after the pump is disconnected. Chemo on Wed. with disconnect on Friday allows hubby to rest over the weekend.


    BTW... our 39 year old son and family live in Baltimore and attend Eastern AOG. Scott is one of the managers at the Tweeter store in Towsend. His wife teaches at the local college. Scott has Celiac Syndrome (a colon issue that puts him at a much higher risk for co)

    I will gladly pray for both of you!

    Diane

    Thanks Diane
    Thanks for the encouragement, Diane. He hasn't been staged by his doctors yet - out of curiosity, why do you say stage III?

    Congratulations on finishing your chemo! I will definitely be picking your brain over the coming weeks and months. This whole board seems to be really wonderful and encouraging - more so than any other I've found so far.

    We live near Towson - in Lutherville. I know where the Tweeter store is! :-)
  • abmb
    abmb Member Posts: 311
    Welcome
    Hi, my husband was diagnosed on April 8th with colon cancer. the doc knew right away his tumors were cancerous, he had a total of 3 tumors. After surgery it took about 7-8 days for the pathology report to come through with a complete diagnosis, 4 out of 30 lymph nodes tested positive for cancer so he is staged at stage 3C. He had all but about 6 inches of his colon removed and today received his 10th treatment. Expect your husband to be in the hospital about 5-8 days, and whenever you think of something don't expect to remember it to ask the docs. Write everything down. I started keeping a journal of meds and procedures that started on 4/8. Every med they gave him in the hospital and since surgery. He has trouble with clotting, so he is on coumadin and that has to be monitored closely. Not everyone has this problem. Remember your doc works for you. If you think your husband will require chemo, start checking out different docs now. Try to find one that is compassionate and will spend time talking to you. His onc will spend as much time with us each visit. The letter explaining what to expect when we first visited him, said "Be prepared to wait." Nicest doc and my husband needed that. You did the right thing by checking out this website. The people on this site are very supportive and always receptive to whatever your needs. Take care and God Bless. Margaret
  • Steve Z
    Steve Z Member Posts: 51
    About 5 Weeks In Front of You
    I'm 38 and was Diagnosed on 9/14. My tumor and Ascending Colon was removed on 9/21. 0 for 37 on my Lymphnodes. It's a roller coaster ride. I chose to focus on whatever the next step was and not get caught up in %'s etc. The thing with %'s no matter what they are you don't know which side you'll end up on. I got as much information as I could, found Doc's I was confident in, and assumed things would work out.

    My surgery was Laparoscopic. I had some difficulties after surgery. My digestive system went on vacation for a few days, then I had a small infection. Within 2 weeks I was feeling like my old self, just needed to take naps for a while. I return on work this coming Monday.

    Now I'm working with my Oncologist to figure out whether to have Chemo or not. . . Again I would worry about that now. Focus on Surgery and recovering from that. I tell you my experience just so you can get a sense for what you may experience. By the way I'm outside of Philly, as a kid I spent summers with my gradmother on the Elk River at the top of the Chesapeake.
  • abmb said:

    Welcome
    Hi, my husband was diagnosed on April 8th with colon cancer. the doc knew right away his tumors were cancerous, he had a total of 3 tumors. After surgery it took about 7-8 days for the pathology report to come through with a complete diagnosis, 4 out of 30 lymph nodes tested positive for cancer so he is staged at stage 3C. He had all but about 6 inches of his colon removed and today received his 10th treatment. Expect your husband to be in the hospital about 5-8 days, and whenever you think of something don't expect to remember it to ask the docs. Write everything down. I started keeping a journal of meds and procedures that started on 4/8. Every med they gave him in the hospital and since surgery. He has trouble with clotting, so he is on coumadin and that has to be monitored closely. Not everyone has this problem. Remember your doc works for you. If you think your husband will require chemo, start checking out different docs now. Try to find one that is compassionate and will spend time talking to you. His onc will spend as much time with us each visit. The letter explaining what to expect when we first visited him, said "Be prepared to wait." Nicest doc and my husband needed that. You did the right thing by checking out this website. The people on this site are very supportive and always receptive to whatever your needs. Take care and God Bless. Margaret

    This comment has been removed by the Moderator
  • dianetavegia
    dianetavegia Member Posts: 1,942
    TLG320 said:

    Thanks Diane
    Thanks for the encouragement, Diane. He hasn't been staged by his doctors yet - out of curiosity, why do you say stage III?

    Congratulations on finishing your chemo! I will definitely be picking your brain over the coming weeks and months. This whole board seems to be really wonderful and encouraging - more so than any other I've found so far.

    We live near Towson - in Lutherville. I know where the Tweeter store is! :-)

    Sparrows Point
    Scott lives in Sparrows Point. :o) Stop by the store and introduce yourself. He's got a whole group of prayer warriors he calls on.

    Hmmm... I thought I read Stage III but am guessing I assumed it because of the extent of the surgery. Has the surgeon implied the tumor broke through the wall?

    I'll help any way I can. We have loads of people who've been doing this much longer than I have.

    Hubby should start taking Calcium, Vit. D3, NO red meats (eat a Mediterranean Diet), exercise 5 X week and once he's finished with surgery and chemo, 1 full strength aspirin daily.

    Click Here
  • dianetavegia
    dianetavegia Member Posts: 1,942
    Ms. R: Rectal cancer would
    Ms. R: Rectal cancer would be radiation and chemo, surgery, then more chemo. Colon cancer, unless it's spread to other organs, is surgery and then chemo.

    Anal cancer is a totally different thing. It's caused by the Human Papilloma Virus, like cervical cancer, and gets different chemo drugs, etc.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
  • TLG320
    TLG320 Member Posts: 167
    Steve Z said:

    About 5 Weeks In Front of You
    I'm 38 and was Diagnosed on 9/14. My tumor and Ascending Colon was removed on 9/21. 0 for 37 on my Lymphnodes. It's a roller coaster ride. I chose to focus on whatever the next step was and not get caught up in %'s etc. The thing with %'s no matter what they are you don't know which side you'll end up on. I got as much information as I could, found Doc's I was confident in, and assumed things would work out.

    My surgery was Laparoscopic. I had some difficulties after surgery. My digestive system went on vacation for a few days, then I had a small infection. Within 2 weeks I was feeling like my old self, just needed to take naps for a while. I return on work this coming Monday.

    Now I'm working with my Oncologist to figure out whether to have Chemo or not. . . Again I would worry about that now. Focus on Surgery and recovering from that. I tell you my experience just so you can get a sense for what you may experience. By the way I'm outside of Philly, as a kid I spent summers with my gradmother on the Elk River at the top of the Chesapeake.

    My husband's ascending colon
    My husband's ascending colon is also being removed. Did your surgeon recommend laproscopic surgery, or did you have the option between that and open?

    Good luck returning to work on Monday. I'm sure you're looking forward to getting back to a schedule. Keep up posted on whether or not you decide to do Chemo.
  • TLG320
    TLG320 Member Posts: 167
    abmb said:

    Welcome
    Hi, my husband was diagnosed on April 8th with colon cancer. the doc knew right away his tumors were cancerous, he had a total of 3 tumors. After surgery it took about 7-8 days for the pathology report to come through with a complete diagnosis, 4 out of 30 lymph nodes tested positive for cancer so he is staged at stage 3C. He had all but about 6 inches of his colon removed and today received his 10th treatment. Expect your husband to be in the hospital about 5-8 days, and whenever you think of something don't expect to remember it to ask the docs. Write everything down. I started keeping a journal of meds and procedures that started on 4/8. Every med they gave him in the hospital and since surgery. He has trouble with clotting, so he is on coumadin and that has to be monitored closely. Not everyone has this problem. Remember your doc works for you. If you think your husband will require chemo, start checking out different docs now. Try to find one that is compassionate and will spend time talking to you. His onc will spend as much time with us each visit. The letter explaining what to expect when we first visited him, said "Be prepared to wait." Nicest doc and my husband needed that. You did the right thing by checking out this website. The people on this site are very supportive and always receptive to whatever your needs. Take care and God Bless. Margaret

    How soon after...
    How soon after surgery did you husband begin chemo? How many months is his chemo regimen? Thanks Margaret!
  • TLG320
    TLG320 Member Posts: 167

    Sparrows Point
    Scott lives in Sparrows Point. :o) Stop by the store and introduce yourself. He's got a whole group of prayer warriors he calls on.

    Hmmm... I thought I read Stage III but am guessing I assumed it because of the extent of the surgery. Has the surgeon implied the tumor broke through the wall?

    I'll help any way I can. We have loads of people who've been doing this much longer than I have.

    Hubby should start taking Calcium, Vit. D3, NO red meats (eat a Mediterranean Diet), exercise 5 X week and once he's finished with surgery and chemo, 1 full strength aspirin daily.

    Click Here

    thanks for the info
    Neither the surgeon nor gastrointerologist implied that the tumor had broken through the wall. What caught all of this was my husband's anemia - he's had no other symptoms whatsoever. Before the biopsy results even came back, his gastrointerologist said that whatever it was, it needed to come out because of the bleeding. That was his initial reasoning for getting him in for surgery quickly.

    Thank you for your prayers, Diane!
  • dianetavegia
    dianetavegia Member Posts: 1,942
    TLG320 said:

    How soon after...
    How soon after surgery did you husband begin chemo? How many months is his chemo regimen? Thanks Margaret!

    Chemo begins
    Chemo begins 5-6 weeks after surgery. It's 12 treatments over approx. 6 months. One every two weeks. FOLFOX is the standard treatment for Stage II, III and other drugs are added for Stage IV's. Tx can be postponed if the WBC's or platelets drop or liver enzymes rise.

    FOLFOX is a cocktail of 3 drugs. Pre-treatment is an infusion of a steroid, usually Benadryl or another antihistamine to prevent allergic reactions and a med to prevent nausea.

    The pre treatment takes about 30 mins, then the RN starts the chemo. That can take 2 - 4 hours. Some people are given smaller amounts two days in a row. When the chemo ends, the nurse gives a 'bolus', think booster shot, of a chemo drug into the line and then hooks up the fanny pack to wear home for 46 hours.

    Diane
  • Ms. R: Rectal cancer would
    Ms. R: Rectal cancer would be radiation and chemo, surgery, then more chemo. Colon cancer, unless it's spread to other organs, is surgery and then chemo.

    Anal cancer is a totally different thing. It's caused by the Human Papilloma Virus, like cervical cancer, and gets different chemo drugs, etc.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    This comment has been removed by the Moderator
  • Jacq03
    Jacq03 Member Posts: 9
    unknown said:

    This comment has been removed by the Moderator

    Take it a day at a time
    I was diagnosed on July 27, and had surgery on Sept. 3. I too focused on the next steps, never allowing my mind to go beyond that. (I am 45 with three kids). And I agree with not dwelling too much on %'s. True, you never know what side you'll end up on. Every test I did came back with "something" which always turned out to be not much of anything. Doc told me after surgery that the tumor was deep in the wall- and we were all surprised and pleased that I was negative in all 26 nodes! Stage 1- after "all that." Stay in the moment. And experience all the emotions you are experiencing. We have all been there and will hold you through this.
  • impactzone
    impactzone Member Posts: 538
    As a stage 4 guy here is
    As a stage 4 guy here is some advice:
    1) Make sure you are going to a well known cancer center if at all possible. Get a surgeon who has done this before

    2) keep all records - start a binder

    3)You have plenty of time... but do your research in your area. Find a good onc that you feel comfortable with

    4)Accept all help from friends and family and get support for yourself as a caregiver.

    I'm sure all will be good.

    Chip
  • Kathryn_in_MN
    Kathryn_in_MN Member Posts: 1,252
    TLG320 said:

    My husband's ascending colon
    My husband's ascending colon is also being removed. Did your surgeon recommend laproscopic surgery, or did you have the option between that and open?

    Good luck returning to work on Monday. I'm sure you're looking forward to getting back to a schedule. Keep up posted on whether or not you decide to do Chemo.

    I would opt for laproscopic
    I would opt for laproscopic if he is a candidate for it. The recovery is much faster. They will warn you that if things don't go smoothly you can end up with open anyway.

    It isn't quite like other laps, because you need an incision large enough to take out the colon. I had one small incision below the bikini line (on a previous scar line), two small incisions upper and lower abdomen on the right side, and a larger incision on the left (about 3 inches). My surgeon says it is the same one he uses for laproscopic appendectemies. I am thrilled with the results of my surgery. I healed quickly, and 7 weeks out you can't hardly even see any scars - it is amazing! (I've had multiple surgeries before, and this was the easiest one.)
  • AceSFO
    AceSFO Member Posts: 229

    As a stage 4 guy here is
    As a stage 4 guy here is some advice:
    1) Make sure you are going to a well known cancer center if at all possible. Get a surgeon who has done this before

    2) keep all records - start a binder

    3)You have plenty of time... but do your research in your area. Find a good onc that you feel comfortable with

    4)Accept all help from friends and family and get support for yourself as a caregiver.

    I'm sure all will be good.

    Chip

    I'm a caregiver also
    Hi - I'm sorry to hear about your husband's diagnosis. My partner was dx'd 2 years ago with stage 3 as well (age 49). Chip's suggestions are good ones. We started a notebook right away where we keep track of questions we want to ask, the answers we receive, notes about each visit and procedure and a list of medications. We also picked up business cards from each doctor or nurse that we met with and keep those in the notebook as well. I recently started my own notebook and keep a list of current medications in the front. It comes in really handy if you have to go to the ER or urgent care where they'll need that information.

    There's a really great book I'd recommend called The Power of Two: Surviving a Serious Illness with an Attitude and an Advocate, by Gerri and Brian Monaghan. First off, it's a great story (even funny in places) and it's full of really useful tips for caregivers. I think it's about $15 on Amazon.

    Take care of yourself through this as well -

    wishing you tenacity and courage,
    Adrian
  • patsy1954
    patsy1954 Member Posts: 85
    Hello and Welcome
    Welcome! You will find tons of support on this site and it does help to have people to chat with that are going through the same stuff. I was diagnosed on 4/10/09 and had surgery on 4/12/09. I didn't even have time to think about what was happening. I had a CT scan on 4/9 that showed cancer in my transferse colon, and cancer in half of my liver with cancer in many lymph nodes. My cancer was Stage 4 because it had spread to the lymphatic system and to a major organ. It sounds like they caught your husbands cancer at an early stage since it is not in a major organ like the liver or lungs. When I had my surgery they removed half of my colon and did a biopsy of the liver and removed 16 lymph nodes. There are lymph nodes that are cancerous around the major blood vessel leading to my heart. Due to the danger of removing those lymph nodes they had to leave them there. I started chemo 3 weeks after surgery on 5/4, they wanted to start it on 4/27 (2 weeks after surgery) but I was still feeling pretty miserable from the surgery. My surgical oncologist was involved in the trials for Oxilaplatin which is one of the newest chemos for colon cancer, so I felt really confortable with the decision to have the chemo tx. The side effects from the chemo can be brutal, but just keep saying "it's getting rid of the cancer." I just finished my last round of 12 treatments and have a CT scan in 2 days to see how the chemo worked. I am convinced that it did the trick. Make sure that you let the oncologist know if your husband gets lots of nausea from the chemo. There is no need to be nauseous, there are lots of drugs that can help control it. I have been a nurse for 33 yrs and never thought that I could get cancer, but it happens to lots of people. We on the board are here for you, just ask and people will help as best they can.

    Pat
  • amyboston
    amyboston Member Posts: 91
    Thoughts and Prayers!
    TLG,
    You and your husband will be in my thoughts and prayers.

    I was diagnosed Oct 6th with Stage IIB SIgmoid colon cancer. My surgery is scheduled for Nov 13th. is going to be laproscopic (if everything goes as planned).

    This discussion group has been heaven sent for me. It has helped me through a very difficult time. I have received support here that has helped me wade through all the medical terms and decisions. The folks on here are great! And I don't feel so alone.

    My blessings and prayers for you and your husband during this difficult time,

    Amy
  • TLG320
    TLG320 Member Posts: 167
    You all are amazing!
    You'll be hearing more from me in the coming weeks, I'm sure. I am so appreciative of your encouragement and willingness to share your experiences. You are all incredibly strong human beings. I feel as though I'm in very good company!
  • Buzzard
    Buzzard Member Posts: 3,043
    TLG320 said:

    You all are amazing!
    You'll be hearing more from me in the coming weeks, I'm sure. I am so appreciative of your encouragement and willingness to share your experiences. You are all incredibly strong human beings. I feel as though I'm in very good company!

    Well My Dear You Are !!!
    In the best of company...and in the most knowledgeable bunch of semi colons one could ever meet. You need to first learn how to "b-r-e-a-t-h-e", then proceed with each individual task with him. Take each appt, each scan or whatever it is as another step towards the finish line, and you will both get there, it just takes patience and time. Look at it as spending the quality time with each other that the both of you never could find the time for before now. It will be taxing but manageable...Good luck to both of you,Clift
  • shrevebud
    shrevebud Member Posts: 105
    Hi TLG
    Hi there:

    I am 49 with stage IV - was diagnosed almost three years ago. I'm still living life, still working full-time, doing what I can whenever I have the energy. There will be good days/bad days and sometimes good weeks and bad weeks. I had a bad week last week. It can be a journey with a lot of ups and downs but you just have to hang in there and try not get overwhelmed with bad news, lab results, scan results, etc. Just take it one step at a time. I found that trying to keep my routine as similar as before diagnosis helped me mentally deal with the unexpected, etc. There are a lot of good people on this forum with good advice and lots of support and encouragement. I'll keep you and your husband in my prayers. Take care. Roy
  • tootsie1
    tootsie1 Member Posts: 5,036
    Scary, but it'll be okay
    Hi! I'm sorry about your husband's diagnosis. I know it's a scary time, but you WILL get through it. I was diagnosed in Nov. almost 2 years ago, and I understand the emotions it can bring. Just believe this-life will be different from now on, but it will also be very, very good. The two of you WILL get to travel, play, work, be with family, all the things you like to do now.

    Please come here often and get help and comfort from a great group.

    *hugs*
    Gail
  • lisa42
    lisa42 Member Posts: 3,625
    encouragement
    Dear "Scared Wife",

    Many people have given lots of information already, so I don't really have any info to add to that. I will, however, offer my support and prayers. I know how scary this can be. I was diagnosed 2-1/2 yrs ago as stage IV w/ mets to liver and lungs when I had just turned 41.
    I've been hanging in there & still function as a busy mom of three kids.
    There is hope and this doesn't mean it's a death sentence.
    If you have a faith in Jesus, then know that I share that faith and will be praying not only for good physical health in the near future, but strong emotional/mental/spiritual health and strength during all this.

    Hugs,
    Lisa
  • thready
    thready Member Posts: 474
    lisa42 said:

    encouragement
    Dear "Scared Wife",

    Many people have given lots of information already, so I don't really have any info to add to that. I will, however, offer my support and prayers. I know how scary this can be. I was diagnosed 2-1/2 yrs ago as stage IV w/ mets to liver and lungs when I had just turned 41.
    I've been hanging in there & still function as a busy mom of three kids.
    There is hope and this doesn't mean it's a death sentence.
    If you have a faith in Jesus, then know that I share that faith and will be praying not only for good physical health in the near future, but strong emotional/mental/spiritual health and strength during all this.

    Hugs,
    Lisa

    Glad you are here
    Diane,
    It is a good thing that you are here. You will get a lot of incouragement and a lot of really good advice. I am sort of a newbie. I just started chemo today, it went better than I expected.

    I have received info from Diane about ways that I can help my self, from others who, when I questioned the need to have chemo (I'm a IIIB), suggested I wake up and realise this is my chance for survival. (I did hear from others who were a bit more colorful, but they made their point) I am very grateful that so many here were willing to speak to me and at me this helped.

    Best wishes. I am learning and would be willing to share how my chemo and what they are doing for me etc. The other stuff-well I am learning.
    Jan
  • jen58
    jen58 Member Posts: 34
    hey all
    My hubby was dx on 9/15/09 (age 43) -- he had 2 tumors, one in ascending and one at splenic flexture... we had to wait a month to get surgery, but he had his surgery on 10/18 -- he had a total colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis and all his lymph nodes were removed for his colon.

    his ascending tumor was as big as an orange, but my hubby never had any symptoms, he went in for routine screening, because both his father and brother had/died from CC... My hubby has HNPCC (lynch syndrome) and also has signet ring cell.

    he was in hospital for 8 days, tho day 1 was just prep, and he is doing GREAT!!! he is already almost back to his normal self and he isn't having any bathroom issues that are associate with his kind of surgery.

    We are still awaiting pathology, which will probably be getting next friday during our appt with onc...but we are expecting IIIB or C based on the fact that the surgeon said that there was significant lymph node involvement on the 1 tumor -- he'll be doing FOLFOX for 6 months once he's cleared to get started

    the thing that bothers him the most is that he feels great physically and has not had 1 symptom of 'cancer' and it's weird to feel so healthy and yet know that you are not.

    TLG -- i sure hope you are going to a board certified colorectal surgeon, that can make all the difference in the world -- my hubby's surgeon is literally the 'best' surgeon in our area and has been winning awards since the 1990s -- my hubby also had the open surgery and his incision is already fading, after less than 2 weeks!

    best of luck to you and your hubby!
  • TLG320
    TLG320 Member Posts: 167
    AceSFO said:

    I'm a caregiver also
    Hi - I'm sorry to hear about your husband's diagnosis. My partner was dx'd 2 years ago with stage 3 as well (age 49). Chip's suggestions are good ones. We started a notebook right away where we keep track of questions we want to ask, the answers we receive, notes about each visit and procedure and a list of medications. We also picked up business cards from each doctor or nurse that we met with and keep those in the notebook as well. I recently started my own notebook and keep a list of current medications in the front. It comes in really handy if you have to go to the ER or urgent care where they'll need that information.

    There's a really great book I'd recommend called The Power of Two: Surviving a Serious Illness with an Attitude and an Advocate, by Gerri and Brian Monaghan. First off, it's a great story (even funny in places) and it's full of really useful tips for caregivers. I think it's about $15 on Amazon.

    Take care of yourself through this as well -

    wishing you tenacity and courage,
    Adrian

    Thanks Adrian!
    I'm going to look for the book. I appreciate your tips! You all will no doubt be hearing a lot from me in the coming weeks. You are all in my prayers!
    Tashina
  • pf78248
    pf78248 Member Posts: 209
    Hi TLG
    I, too, am the wife of a colon cancer survivor, stage 3C in 2008, now stage 4. This is a great sight for information and support. You've been given lots of advice and now there is so much information to digest. It's almost overwhelming. As you have questions, post them and there are so many who will give you advice.

    My only other suggestion for now is to order from either the American Cancer Society direct, or Amazon, or in a big bookstore, the American Cancer Society Guide to Colorectal Cancer and also their book on caregiving. Very good information and a good reference book as you make your way through this new language you'll be learning.

    Best of luck to your hubby. He's going to need lots of love and support and I know you will be there for him. But do take time for yourself, too. Life changes after cancer and you can find it can make you even closer.

    Hugs to you and all the other newly diagnosed cancer families.
    Priscilla
  • Julie 44
    Julie 44 Member Posts: 476
    pf78248 said:

    Hi TLG
    I, too, am the wife of a colon cancer survivor, stage 3C in 2008, now stage 4. This is a great sight for information and support. You've been given lots of advice and now there is so much information to digest. It's almost overwhelming. As you have questions, post them and there are so many who will give you advice.

    My only other suggestion for now is to order from either the American Cancer Society direct, or Amazon, or in a big bookstore, the American Cancer Society Guide to Colorectal Cancer and also their book on caregiving. Very good information and a good reference book as you make your way through this new language you'll be learning.

    Best of luck to your hubby. He's going to need lots of love and support and I know you will be there for him. But do take time for yourself, too. Life changes after cancer and you can find it can make you even closer.

    Hugs to you and all the other newly diagnosed cancer families.
    Priscilla

    Hey there
    First I want to welcome you both here.We are a greatbunch of people with so much experience and love to share.We have all been there and done that in some form or another....
    Once things start to sink in you won't feel like a deer caught in head lights...Yes it is scarey for both of you.
    Being the caregiver is just as hard and emotional as being the one to have it...Try to talk it all over with each.Go over everything doctors,appts,meds,surgery everything and if it doesn't all feel right to you I WOULD HIGHLY RECOMMEND A SECOND OPINION. It has given me a great peice of mind to know what the docs at Sloane Kittering Memerial Cancer Center in NYC said they would do the exact treatment that my doc had planned for me.So right there I knew things were getting better.
    Hang it there I won't lie it is very hard emotionaly and physically but we all came through and are here to shaere what we have learned...So Good luck Get that second opinion to stop the what ifs then move on from there.
    One day at a time sometimes its one minuet at a time but you find you will get through it...Ask questions like crazy because knowledge is power..Good feel free to ipm me if you wish.I will help you out whenever I can and if I can't I am sure we can find someone who can.Best of luck..
    Keep the communications line open with Hubby it helps....JULIE