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have stage 111 and am still smoking HELP

patricia55
Posts: 10
Joined: Aug 2009

I was diagionsed with lung cancer in may 09 had ct scan, bome scan, pet scan and nothing had spread. I saw an oncoligest who is great and a surgon who will not even talk to me about any options of quiting EXECPT COLD TURKEY i have smoked for 48 years and smoked 2 to 3 packs a day no matter how hard I try I can not put them down. I am on radiation 5 days a week for last 2 weeks and on chemo 1 day a wwek taking pacital and carboplatain anyone got any advice or sugestions?

soccerfreaks's picture
soccerfreaks
Posts: 2801
Joined: Sep 2006

Although I managed to quit twice, for a year each time, and both times going cold turkey, the only thing that has really worked for me is getting half of my tongue cut out. I doubt you want to go to that extreme (and I'm fairly certain that even THAT doesn't work for some people, as you, yourself, can attest to vis a vis the lung cancer dx :)).

Some friends of mine swear by the Chantrix (or whatever...my spelling is certainly off). I think it is a prescription.

Personally, I just remind myself now what the smoking has done, and that all of the money I gave to the tobacco companies over the years was money spent so that they could kill me while spending my money on mansions and motorboats.

It really does boil down to you, though.

Good luck.

Take care,

Joe

Glenna M's picture
Glenna M
Posts: 1576
Joined: May 2009

I really wish there was a "magic" cure for the addiction as it is one of the hardest things I have tried to do. The next hardest thing was the treatments I had to undergo for something that was caused by this addiction.

I smoked for about 40 years and was up to 2 packs a day and the only thing that has helped me was reading that smoking while undergoing treatment decreases the effects of the treatment. Every time I think of a cigarette now I remind myself that they were the cause of both of my cancers. Both of my cancers are inoperable and I'll be damned if I will let cigarettes take away what precious time these treatments are buying me.

I agree with Joe, it's all up to you. I wish I could be of more help to you but it's a tough battle but you can win, just keep reminding yourself that cigarettes aren't going to help you win the battle with cancer.

Wishing you the best of luck.

Glenna

catcon49's picture
catcon49
Posts: 398
Joined: Aug 2008

I quit after they took a portion of my lung out. That was enough for me. I tried about 6 times in the 3 years before my dx. with no luck. But I decided that losing part of my lung was enough for me. I tried zyban, hypnosis, and welbutrin, and something else. Nothing seemed to last until I really made my mind up to quit.

stayingcalm's picture
stayingcalm
Posts: 656
Joined: Feb 2007

Patricia,

At the risk of sounding like a broken record (as I've given this advice a couple of times here) or a patch pitchman - try using the Patch, whether Nicoderm or store brand, doesn't really matter. Once you make up your mind that you really need to quit, that's when it will work for you, giving you the nicotine without causing more lung damage. You may have a couple of false starts (as I did, a 2-pack/day smoker for 35 years), but give yourself kudos for trying and then go ahead and try again. Luck be with you!

suebanj
Posts: 16
Joined: Jul 2009

When I was told that I most likely had lung cancer in June, 2009 I still smoked through the CT Scan and PET Scan...When I went to the thoracic surgeorn for removal of my upper left lobe, he told me he would not do the operation until I had stopped smoking for atleast two weeks since smoking can cause alot of problems during and after the operation. Well, I did finish smoking that day, June 17th but that was it. The next day I put the patch on and wore it until July 5th, two days prior to my surgery and haven't had to use it since. I think when I finally realized what the cigarette did to my body and the pain and recovery after the surgery...that's it for me...no more cigarettes. It's sad that it took Lung Cancer for me to finally quit smoking. I am so grateful though that it was caught so early and I didn't need any treatments...I want to fully enjoy my life, cigarette free.
Good Luck to you...It's tough but it can be done!

patricia55
Posts: 10
Joined: Aug 2009

may I ask where you live I am in ohio and my dr won't talk operating because I smoked again he has NO tollerance for ciggarettes and has NO COMPASSION for the trials we go thru with this addition

suebanj
Posts: 16
Joined: Jul 2009

Hi...I live in The Villages, Florida and that is where the surgeon is...He explained to me that there are many problems that could occur during the operation if I continued smoking....He wasn't going to take the responsibility if something happened to me during the operation that was due to my smoking.. Apparently it affects the blood. The day after he spoke to me I slapped a patch on and had it on for two weeks until the operation....Haven't had a cigarette now in 2 1/2 months....Having part of my lung removed is enough for me right now to not smoke....I hope it stays that way....It isn't easy, but it can be done...Good luck!

soccerfreaks's picture
soccerfreaks
Posts: 2801
Joined: Sep 2006

My docs brought me in to the hospital in September of 05 for my October head/neck cancer surgery. (Lung cancer came later.)

They kept me for two weeks while running tests and weaning me of cigarettes and alcohol, and I am pretty darned sure they would not have done that 15-hour surgery if they thought I was gonna have a reaction due to an absence of tobacco or alcohol that suddenly became noticeable to my otherwise sleeping body (I quit drinking, to be honest, but smoked my last cigarette while my wife drove us to the hospital for the real deal, the surgery, and another two weeks in the Hole).

Your doctors, in other words, and as sue is suggesting, may not be acting cruelly, but professionally.

Best wishes with the quitting. Again, I know it is hard. But, it is DOABLE.

Take care,

Joe

mshutt58
Posts: 3
Joined: Sep 2009

Hello, I am not suebanj but I am also in ohio and would like to pass along my Dr's name. Although he tried for many months to get me to quit before having surgery, I did not quit and he did the surgery anyway. I think each case is different but his name is Sudish Murthy and he is the head of the thorasic surgery dept at the cleveland cilinc. I hope this helps you out. Mike

joni92314
Posts: 3
Joined: Jul 2009

Get another doctor/surgeon. The first surgeon that I went to asked me if I was stupid because even tho I had been diagnosed I was still smoking, granted not as much and I did'nt have any symptons. I asked for a second opinion and this time I was lucky and got a surgeon that said "I will take care of you". I had surgery in December 08 and the cancer hadn't metastized. I am cancer free. Something that helped me that might help you too is that when I had the desire I took 2 pufyofs and put it out. The last cigarett that I had was 2 puffs the night before my surgery. That dosent mean that once in a while my brain says maybe.....but I do enjoy breathing. I pray that you find the right doctor for you and that you get the miracle of a second chance too......

radehoover
Posts: 1
Joined: Aug 2009

Hi -- I read a book and never picked up another cigarette. The book is "The Easy Way to Stop Smoking" by Allen Carr. Get the book. Today. Then read it. You can smoke while you read it but I'm guessing you'll want to stop before you finish the book. The problem with any nicotine replacement therapy (patches, gum, lozenges, etc.), is you're continuing to feed your addiction. You need to get rid of the nicotine in your system (takes about 3 days), and then you deal with the psychological side. This book should do the trick, if you really want to quit. If you don't WANT to quit, REALLY want to quit, don't bother with the book.

Good luck!!!!

Greggriggs's picture
Greggriggs
Posts: 132
Joined: Dec 2006

Yep I smoked for 52 years.
I still find myself thinking about having a smoke.
But it goes away fast. I quit lotsa times I guess when they told me quit or no surgery It made a difference.
They removed my left lung in 2006 .
I guess the ativan helped me quit but I was taking it so I could sleep but maybe it took the edge off I never thought about it until you posted your problem.
I chewed that nicotine gum and after the surgery I wasn't thinking about smoking to much so I guess that helped also.
Any way can't say I blame ya for smoking it is a B-tch to quit .
You could always lie to your Doctor an tell him ya quit . I didn't say that!!!
God bless ya an I hope it all works out for you what ever happens .
Greg
Maybe you could try some ativan at least you wouldn't care what people say about you smoking.
You could just say so what maybe tomorrow .

Artin2010's picture
Artin2010
Posts: 17
Joined: Aug 2009

I too have dealt with major addictions in the past and quite frankly right now today. It is a struggle from day to day to stop any bad habit formed and practiced.
There are three key elements to changing behaviors! From what I can understand,
!.Believe and trust that change will come. When you feel trapped in a bad situation you mustcontinue to talk to self and encourage self that there is hope, a way out of the bad position you are in. Change is a law of life, it will always happen.
2. Find a fan or sponsor, make friends with someone you know who can understand what you are up against, someone whos sees you as a person with the willingness to battle against your troubles, there are many who have put themselves to a challenge, fought the battle and won the victory, and most often, if you can find one of them, they are willing to share, encourage and simple give you the pep talk that might be the difference. One person having faith in you can make the difference and help you close the gap between where you are right now and where you want to be.
3. Take the time you need to overcome adversity, We are all guilty of underestimating how long it will take for us to change. When we're not transformed to a new me in a couple of weeks we tend to give up and give in to self! If you stay focused on the task of changing and try to be patient you will notice changes along the way, however small the change is do not neglect to reward yourself for making the small goal or mark. It is said that the urge to smoke 1 cigarette from the time it starts to the time it goes away is approximately 90 seconds to two minutes. When this urge comes on try to remain calm and realize what is happening, occupy yourself with something such as reading something interesting, writing in your journal, or here perhaps,chew candy, or a straw until a few minutes pass. Matter affects us, the mind controls us, so if you can learn to master controlling your mind, instead of it controlling you, you are well on the way to stopping any behaviors you don't like about you.
I reccomend that any of you who have it in your mind to change and are the least bit open minded for suggestion take a look at firstthirtydays.com, very good stuff there for someone wanting to change!
I hope that my long windedness is of some help to someone out there, because I too have things I am trying to change. I do want serenity and I want fullness of life experience, longevity and patience! Best of luck to those who want to make new and healthier habits in life. Life was never meant for us to try and destroy with self-destructive behaviors in the first place, that my friends is a human condition we probably all would like to change!
God Bless and good luck changing... Art

amscheu
Posts: 1
Joined: Sep 2009

I quit 1 month before diagnosis ( I am 44 and thought I had Bronchitis) The studies that I have looked into say nicotine (patches, gum etc. INCREASE tumor growth, not necessarily causing cancer) After all of the research....Cold Turkey, again and again and again!
Good Luck and God Bless

stayingcalm's picture
stayingcalm
Posts: 656
Joined: Feb 2007

From an American Cancer Society article:

"People have to be careful about how they use nicotine patches and nicotine gum," says Cooke. "They are useful tools for tobacco cessation and are safe if used as directed, but our research indicates that they definitely should not be used on a long-term basis." There are reports that some people use nicotine gum for months or even years, says Cooke and "that may have unintended adverse consequences." Adds Ringer: "Keep in mind that nicotine, like most drugs, has both risks and benefits that have to be weighed and balanced. This is a very well done study that alerts users of nicotine that chronic long-term exposure may involve future increased risk for tumor development or CHD. "However, the use of nicotine replacement therapy for tobacco cessation clearly remains in the benefit column for tobacco users," Ringer says. "This new information should not deter smokers from using nicotine as part of a short term smoking cessation program."

I didn't know about this study, but I think even if I had known I'd have used the patch anyway. For a lung cancer/emphysema patient it all comes down to breathing. Or not breathing :)

PGLGreg's picture
PGLGreg
Posts: 741
Joined: Jul 2006

If you have an operation, they won't let you smoke in the hospital. Then, when you're released from the hospital, you'll have to choose whether to start again. It's a chance for a new beginning: Don't start smoking again. That's how I quit after 47 years, at the end of a 10 day stay in the hospital (for rectal cancer, not lung cancer).

--Greg

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