Oncology review☆

barb55
barb55 Member Posts: 91
edited March 2014 in Uterine Cancer #1
I just got the transcript of the "Management of women with uterine papillary serous cancer: A Society of
Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) review" 2009. I haven't gotten through it yet it is pretty long and technical. Since we all know how limitied info on UPSC is I thought many of you might be interested, but I am not sure how to post it. Can someone help?
Barb

Comments

  • lindaprocopio
    lindaprocopio Member Posts: 1,980
    Is it a PDF file?
    Is the download a PDF file? If so, I have software that should enable me to 'lift' the text just as if it were a Word document. Would you like to email it to me and I can try and convert it to a format that can be posted? ([email protected])

    Or is it just really long? I don't think there is any way to attach anything here.
  • This comment has been removed by the Moderator
  • lindaprocopio
    lindaprocopio Member Posts: 1,980
    unknown said:

    This comment has been removed by the Moderator

    How long is it? Could you fax it and I could convert it?
    I wouldn't want to get a 100-page fax, but if it isn't more than a dozen pages, if you faxed the paper copies to me, I could scan it as a PDF and ReadIris it to convert it to Word. (I have lots of tech gizmos since I work out of my home.) My fax # is 570-648-9912.

    One thought before we do this, particularly on Barb's purchased report. Is it copyright protected? We don't want to get into trouble posting a report that is only available for a price elsewhere. Any idea if we can legally post it? I'd love to read it. How expensive was it to purchase, Barb?
  • california_artist
    california_artist Member Posts: 816 Member
    unknown said:

    This comment has been removed by the Moderator

    The upsc 2009 report
    Pat, could you re-email that to me?
    My old email is no longer accessible.
    New one
    [email protected]
  • barb55
    barb55 Member Posts: 91
    The transcript costs $31.50 through science direct. It is protected and yes, I would like to avoid breaking any law by posting it. I've been out of town and still haven't read through it all. Any thoughts folks?
    Barb
  • deanna14
    deanna14 Member Posts: 732
    barb55 said:

    The transcript costs $31.50 through science direct. It is protected and yes, I would like to avoid breaking any law by posting it. I've been out of town and still haven't read through it all. Any thoughts folks?
    Barb

    please don't get into trouble!
    I think you should (when you have time), read through it and maybe just post on here a synopsis. Like just share the pertinent stuff. I am sure it is really long and probably a lot of stuff wordy technical stuff in it. I definately don't think you should post it on here! I am good with whatever you decide. You have provided us with the link to purchase the document if we want to. I certainly appreciate that. I may check with my doctor to make sure he is aware the information is available. Thanks Barb.
  • MoeKay
    MoeKay Member Posts: 403 Member
    Possible Options
    If you live near a medical school, the journal Gynecologic Oncology would be available in hard copy in the medical school library. You can discuss the library's copying policies and fees with a research librarian. I recall making a copy of journal articles for my informational and educational purposes for a dime a page after my endometrial cancer diagnosis in 1999.

    Another option would be to contact the corresponding author on the first page of the journal, which provides his name and email address, and explain the situation. He may be willing to make educational copies available to other UPSC cancer survivors.

    Good luck!

    MoeKay
  • lindaprocopio
    lindaprocopio Member Posts: 1,980
    MoeKay said:

    Possible Options
    If you live near a medical school, the journal Gynecologic Oncology would be available in hard copy in the medical school library. You can discuss the library's copying policies and fees with a research librarian. I recall making a copy of journal articles for my informational and educational purposes for a dime a page after my endometrial cancer diagnosis in 1999.

    Another option would be to contact the corresponding author on the first page of the journal, which provides his name and email address, and explain the situation. He may be willing to make educational copies available to other UPSC cancer survivors.

    Good luck!

    MoeKay

    My notes from this article:
    I read the 12-page article, and will share my notes. There were many mortality and survival statistics, but I will not share those as the data was extrapolated from all published scientific study results from January 1966 to May 2009, and factoring in those old stats really skews the results downward, in my opinion. But there was some good information in this article:

    UPSC women are typically:
    older and thinner than other endometrial cancer patients,
    & less likely to have hormonal risk factors than other endometrial; cancer patients;
    & more likely to have BRCA gene;
    More likely to have taken Tamoxifen if they had breast cancer prior to UPSC;
    More likely to have P53 mutation; and
    & more likely to have HER-2/neu gene amplification. The HER-2 predicts a poorer prognosis, but does open up the possibility of targeted molecular therapies.

    Treatment protocols for ovarian serous cancer should be looked at for UPSC recurrences. Adriamycin, cytoxan, & cisplatin bought an average 7 months of remission for recurrent OVARIAN serous cancer women.

    Current 'gold standard' for recurrent UPSC:
    1.) surgery to reduce residual disease to less than 2 CM.
    2.) TAP (paciltaxel + cisplatin + doxorubicin
    3.) tumor-directed radiation
    This 'gold standard' does not increase recurrence-free survival, but DOES increase progression free survival by 8.3 months. It has a high rate of neurotoxicity.

    Sandwiched radiation has been shown to be statistically better than radiation-then-chemo, or chemo-then-radiation.

    UPSC women with CA-125s greater than 35 BEFORE surgery have 3.7 times greater risk of cancer-related death than those with CA-125s under 35 before surgery. (Good news for those of you who have always had low CA-125s. Not so good for us that had tp bring our CA-125s down with chemo.)

    Indicators in addition to CA-125s that could/should be looked at in the future for UPSC include serum markers like HE4 (a soluble mesothelin-related peptide) and YKL-40 (a secreted glycolprotein).

    Herceptin has not yet been studied for UPSC women with HER2, but looks promising.

    The article recommended an 'international rare cancer cooperative network' study of UPSC.
  • deanna14
    deanna14 Member Posts: 732

    My notes from this article:
    I read the 12-page article, and will share my notes. There were many mortality and survival statistics, but I will not share those as the data was extrapolated from all published scientific study results from January 1966 to May 2009, and factoring in those old stats really skews the results downward, in my opinion. But there was some good information in this article:

    UPSC women are typically:
    older and thinner than other endometrial cancer patients,
    & less likely to have hormonal risk factors than other endometrial; cancer patients;
    & more likely to have BRCA gene;
    More likely to have taken Tamoxifen if they had breast cancer prior to UPSC;
    More likely to have P53 mutation; and
    & more likely to have HER-2/neu gene amplification. The HER-2 predicts a poorer prognosis, but does open up the possibility of targeted molecular therapies.

    Treatment protocols for ovarian serous cancer should be looked at for UPSC recurrences. Adriamycin, cytoxan, & cisplatin bought an average 7 months of remission for recurrent OVARIAN serous cancer women.

    Current 'gold standard' for recurrent UPSC:
    1.) surgery to reduce residual disease to less than 2 CM.
    2.) TAP (paciltaxel + cisplatin + doxorubicin
    3.) tumor-directed radiation
    This 'gold standard' does not increase recurrence-free survival, but DOES increase progression free survival by 8.3 months. It has a high rate of neurotoxicity.

    Sandwiched radiation has been shown to be statistically better than radiation-then-chemo, or chemo-then-radiation.

    UPSC women with CA-125s greater than 35 BEFORE surgery have 3.7 times greater risk of cancer-related death than those with CA-125s under 35 before surgery. (Good news for those of you who have always had low CA-125s. Not so good for us that had tp bring our CA-125s down with chemo.)

    Indicators in addition to CA-125s that could/should be looked at in the future for UPSC include serum markers like HE4 (a soluble mesothelin-related peptide) and YKL-40 (a secreted glycolprotein).

    Herceptin has not yet been studied for UPSC women with HER2, but looks promising.

    The article recommended an 'international rare cancer cooperative network' study of UPSC.

    :-)
    I knew we could count on your research skills, Linda. Thanks for the synopsis of the article. You are the best.

    Thanks so much Barb for purchasing and sharing the article!
  • Ro10
    Ro10 Member Posts: 1,561

    My notes from this article:
    I read the 12-page article, and will share my notes. There were many mortality and survival statistics, but I will not share those as the data was extrapolated from all published scientific study results from January 1966 to May 2009, and factoring in those old stats really skews the results downward, in my opinion. But there was some good information in this article:

    UPSC women are typically:
    older and thinner than other endometrial cancer patients,
    & less likely to have hormonal risk factors than other endometrial; cancer patients;
    & more likely to have BRCA gene;
    More likely to have taken Tamoxifen if they had breast cancer prior to UPSC;
    More likely to have P53 mutation; and
    & more likely to have HER-2/neu gene amplification. The HER-2 predicts a poorer prognosis, but does open up the possibility of targeted molecular therapies.

    Treatment protocols for ovarian serous cancer should be looked at for UPSC recurrences. Adriamycin, cytoxan, & cisplatin bought an average 7 months of remission for recurrent OVARIAN serous cancer women.

    Current 'gold standard' for recurrent UPSC:
    1.) surgery to reduce residual disease to less than 2 CM.
    2.) TAP (paciltaxel + cisplatin + doxorubicin
    3.) tumor-directed radiation
    This 'gold standard' does not increase recurrence-free survival, but DOES increase progression free survival by 8.3 months. It has a high rate of neurotoxicity.

    Sandwiched radiation has been shown to be statistically better than radiation-then-chemo, or chemo-then-radiation.

    UPSC women with CA-125s greater than 35 BEFORE surgery have 3.7 times greater risk of cancer-related death than those with CA-125s under 35 before surgery. (Good news for those of you who have always had low CA-125s. Not so good for us that had tp bring our CA-125s down with chemo.)

    Indicators in addition to CA-125s that could/should be looked at in the future for UPSC include serum markers like HE4 (a soluble mesothelin-related peptide) and YKL-40 (a secreted glycolprotein).

    Herceptin has not yet been studied for UPSC women with HER2, but looks promising.

    The article recommended an 'international rare cancer cooperative network' study of UPSC.

    Linda thanks again for sharing
    I always appreciate you research summaries. let's hope we don't have a reoccurence very soon. You are such an inspirtation to all of us. Thanks again. In peace and caring. HUGS to you.
  • linda66
    linda66 Member Posts: 3
    Barb, thanks for letting us
    Barb, thanks for letting us all know about the review and Linda, thanks for your summary!
  • Gunhild
    Gunhild Member Posts: 36

    My notes from this article:
    I read the 12-page article, and will share my notes. There were many mortality and survival statistics, but I will not share those as the data was extrapolated from all published scientific study results from January 1966 to May 2009, and factoring in those old stats really skews the results downward, in my opinion. But there was some good information in this article:

    UPSC women are typically:
    older and thinner than other endometrial cancer patients,
    & less likely to have hormonal risk factors than other endometrial; cancer patients;
    & more likely to have BRCA gene;
    More likely to have taken Tamoxifen if they had breast cancer prior to UPSC;
    More likely to have P53 mutation; and
    & more likely to have HER-2/neu gene amplification. The HER-2 predicts a poorer prognosis, but does open up the possibility of targeted molecular therapies.

    Treatment protocols for ovarian serous cancer should be looked at for UPSC recurrences. Adriamycin, cytoxan, & cisplatin bought an average 7 months of remission for recurrent OVARIAN serous cancer women.

    Current 'gold standard' for recurrent UPSC:
    1.) surgery to reduce residual disease to less than 2 CM.
    2.) TAP (paciltaxel + cisplatin + doxorubicin
    3.) tumor-directed radiation
    This 'gold standard' does not increase recurrence-free survival, but DOES increase progression free survival by 8.3 months. It has a high rate of neurotoxicity.

    Sandwiched radiation has been shown to be statistically better than radiation-then-chemo, or chemo-then-radiation.

    UPSC women with CA-125s greater than 35 BEFORE surgery have 3.7 times greater risk of cancer-related death than those with CA-125s under 35 before surgery. (Good news for those of you who have always had low CA-125s. Not so good for us that had tp bring our CA-125s down with chemo.)

    Indicators in addition to CA-125s that could/should be looked at in the future for UPSC include serum markers like HE4 (a soluble mesothelin-related peptide) and YKL-40 (a secreted glycolprotein).

    Herceptin has not yet been studied for UPSC women with HER2, but looks promising.

    The article recommended an 'international rare cancer cooperative network' study of UPSC.

    Thank You
    Thanks for your help with this document. You have great skill at summarizing. I live in a rural area with few resources locally and appreciate this group.
  • cookie1948
    cookie1948 Member Posts: 77
    unknown said:

    This comment has been removed by the Moderator

    email
    Patricia,
    How long is the report that you can email to me? My email address is [email protected]
    I would like to see this report for stage1 UPSC as my mom has that. thanks so very much.
    Cookie :)
  • daisy366
    daisy366 Member Posts: 1,458 Member

    My notes from this article:
    I read the 12-page article, and will share my notes. There were many mortality and survival statistics, but I will not share those as the data was extrapolated from all published scientific study results from January 1966 to May 2009, and factoring in those old stats really skews the results downward, in my opinion. But there was some good information in this article:

    UPSC women are typically:
    older and thinner than other endometrial cancer patients,
    & less likely to have hormonal risk factors than other endometrial; cancer patients;
    & more likely to have BRCA gene;
    More likely to have taken Tamoxifen if they had breast cancer prior to UPSC;
    More likely to have P53 mutation; and
    & more likely to have HER-2/neu gene amplification. The HER-2 predicts a poorer prognosis, but does open up the possibility of targeted molecular therapies.

    Treatment protocols for ovarian serous cancer should be looked at for UPSC recurrences. Adriamycin, cytoxan, & cisplatin bought an average 7 months of remission for recurrent OVARIAN serous cancer women.

    Current 'gold standard' for recurrent UPSC:
    1.) surgery to reduce residual disease to less than 2 CM.
    2.) TAP (paciltaxel + cisplatin + doxorubicin
    3.) tumor-directed radiation
    This 'gold standard' does not increase recurrence-free survival, but DOES increase progression free survival by 8.3 months. It has a high rate of neurotoxicity.

    Sandwiched radiation has been shown to be statistically better than radiation-then-chemo, or chemo-then-radiation.

    UPSC women with CA-125s greater than 35 BEFORE surgery have 3.7 times greater risk of cancer-related death than those with CA-125s under 35 before surgery. (Good news for those of you who have always had low CA-125s. Not so good for us that had tp bring our CA-125s down with chemo.)

    Indicators in addition to CA-125s that could/should be looked at in the future for UPSC include serum markers like HE4 (a soluble mesothelin-related peptide) and YKL-40 (a secreted glycolprotein).

    Herceptin has not yet been studied for UPSC women with HER2, but looks promising.

    The article recommended an 'international rare cancer cooperative network' study of UPSC.

    THANK YOU, Linda,
    THANK YOU, Linda,

    Appreciate your work!!! I don't like the CA 125 news!!!

    Mary Ann
  • This comment has been removed by the Moderator