CSN Login
Members Online: 4

You are here

ACS

snommintj's picture
snommintj
Posts: 602
Joined: Mar 2009

As far as I can tell, this website is the only benefit I've gotten from the ACS. I say that because I was approached today at lowes by someone raising money for the ACS. I told them I didn't want to donate to the ACS because I didn't think they did enough to help cancer patients. She assured me the ACS provided all kinds of benefits for cancer patients. I asked her what benefits and she rattled off half a dozen things. I asked her where I could sign up for those benefits and she said she wasn't sure who I should talk too. So far the only thing I have gotten from any supposed cancer charity is a case of ensure every month from a local cancer charity. I know that my local ACS has at least 6 employees making very hefty salaries, along with several other part time employees, and a number of volunteers. As far as I can tell everyone either collects donations or organizes events to collect donations. Has anyone on this board benefitted in anyway from the ACS? Please know that I'm not being accusatory, I'm just asking?

Shayenne's picture
Shayenne
Posts: 2370
Joined: Jan 2009

...You get a case of Ensure for free? I can barely afford it, it's 10 bucks for just a 6 pack of them..I don't know what else ACS does, I never really asked for anything, and don't know what really to ask for as a cancer patient, I wonder myself now what they do with all that money they collect.

PamPam2's picture
PamPam2
Posts: 376
Joined: Jan 2009

They did help a little when my dad needed more home care, helped pay a small amount, but I think I remember they wanted it back when he died from the estate. They do offer transportation here to and from appointments and treatments. I used this twice, I think some of the cost is absorbed by the dept. of human services though, not all ACs money. I know they offer free quit smoking classes and workshop type things, more education type stuff than actual help for people with cancer.
Pam

Annabelle41415's picture
Annabelle41415
Posts: 6528
Joined: Feb 2009

I haven't received any help, but I've never asked. I donate at least twice a year, but I figured since I have insurance I would assume they would be helping those without - at least I am hoping this was the case. Not sure how they help - I'm assuming that they do a lot of research to help prevent and cure cancer and that is why I donate to them, but I agree that they need to help the uninsured.

Kim

kimby's picture
kimby
Posts: 804
Joined: Oct 2007

John,

Your local ACS will have a patient navigator that can get you hooked up with services. I'm not sure what all they offer but I do know they offer assistance getting to treatments, there is Hope Lodge for those that have to live more than 100 miles from home to get treatments, they fund some MAJOR canzer research, and supply millions of really crappy brocures. They help fund wig banks at some facilities and organize support groups. Look Good/Feel Better, early detection and prevention stuff. I'm not sure what else but I do a tremendous amount of work for them on a volunteer level, but we're in a really rural area and don't have many paid folks to do it. Just lots of us with canzer.

Kimby

PhillieG's picture
PhillieG
Posts: 4907
Joined: May 2005

Hi John, I think Kimby is on the mark. I have not dealt with them other than here and I donate to buy daffodils every year. Have you personally made a visit to your local center? It didn't sound like you did in your post. You just asked a volunteer where to sign up and I don't think she knew and/or did not want to give you an incorrect answer. You may have to ask the right people, like dealing with insurance.
Circular Logic (also known as the old runaround) You should be used to it with dealing with cancer ;-)
Good luck
-p

kimby's picture
kimby
Posts: 804
Joined: Oct 2007

Can I give you my husband's cell phone number? I really like the "Kimby Knows Best" stuff but he keeps forgetting! Seriously, you're my kinda guy. I'm just sayin'

Kimby

scouty's picture
scouty
Posts: 1976
Joined: Apr 2004

John,

I must say for someone that says they never think about their cancer, you sure do post alot about it. Not being accusatory, I'm just saying. I've read some about your journey and lordy you've had a "good one" so far sir but you need to do some homework before you start threads like this. One that is questioning a really wonderful non-profit. Please define your definition of "hefty salary", NONE of my friends that work there resemble that but really wish they did.

Here is what I know about ACS (American Cancer Society) after over 5 years on this site, several Relays for Life, and an opportunity to watch some of their best at work and using their web site.

They fund this site and all the hardware, personnel, etc, etc that it takes to host a GLOBAL cancer support site like this. They do it for over 120 different types of cancer and support survivors, caregivers, friends, love ones, and anyone else that cares about someone dealing with cancer. Personally they have helped me learn how to save my own life.

They sponsor one of the most visible cancer awareness events, Relay for Life, yearly that is a surreal experience if you are a survivor. My first survival lap almost brought me to my knees, it was so moving. To be able to pull off the event so seamlessly in almost every city in the US is mindboggling to me as a manager of people and their "tasks". The only other event that comes close involves "pink" and don't make me go there but you do have to admit that with $$$ breast cancer survival rates have gone from 75% (all stages) to 90% in the last 10 years.

ACS has had to suck it up and help as much as they can and where they can the last 8 years or so given the prior administration's cancer research/etc significant budget cuts. They sponsor a yearly March on Washington to get the word back out there to our congress men and women. Nixon declared war on cancer in the 70s and while we are making some progress, I do not think it is anything close to where we should have given the money involved.

The books they have published are really good. I especially like the ones about how to talk about cancer with children whether it be about them or a parent and/or loved one and use them as gifts.

Colon Palooza 3 (April 2006) was in Austin, Tx, home of the CSN's (this site) support folks and the 1 800 "someone or me has cancer and I am freaked out" 800 number. They had us in for lunch and a tour and it was really cool. Lunch was particulary amazing as a group of 16 or so of us semi-colons talked about our experiences over a very casual lunch with employees that work 8 hours a day to make anyone dealing with cancer's life a little easier by answering the phone. We each told our stories and there is no doubt in my mind they "heard us", durn some of us cried. I did several times. Next we got to go out and listen to a few of the call ins they got LIVE. Being that it was April, there many calls about the Relays for Life but they were about so many other things, as you could imagine. I actually heard one man call in crying about his wife and the way they talked to him was amazing. He was making a to do list in less than 10 minutes. These very special angel voices that answer that phone are highly skilled and talented people and the thing that stuck with me since I met them, every single one had been "touched" by cancer in some way and that is why they worked there. It had absolutely NOTHING to do with money. Personally I'd rather they get the hefty salaries than so many of the greedy ones out there but like school teachers, cops, fireman, the military and so many other amazing individuals, it ain't gonna happen that way in the good ole USA anytime soon.

The amount of information you can get your hands on from this organization is admired globally. Given my successes thus far against the beast, I do get asked to talk it from time to time and am always amazed at the stats and info I CAN get my hands on with a few clicks. There are so many that dispel rumors if you'll only take the time to read them and I like that.

I hope this helps your information gathering. Let me know if I can help in any other way.

Lisa P.

PamPam2's picture
PamPam2
Posts: 376
Joined: Jan 2009

Thanks Lisa for reminding me that this site itself must be very expensive to have and maintain. It is a wonderful site to help people dealing with cancer to cope and survive. I also did not even think about all the lobbying that must be done with the government as far as research and treatments and standards of care. I knew the ACS did a lot with education and education for cancer patients, but did not think of the overall picture till I read your post.
Pam

PhillieG's picture
PhillieG
Posts: 4907
Joined: May 2005

Wow Lisa, what an informative post. It's nice to know that the monies are going to good causes. The cutbacks of the last 8 years has hit many organizations like this rather hard. Things look much brighter for the future with the current people in charge.
-phil

tootsie1's picture
tootsie1
Posts: 5056
Joined: Feb 2008

I've been invovlved in Relay for Life for many years, long before I had the "pleasure" of being a cancer patient. I think the American Cancer Society does a lot! Here is what is in my Team Handbook I received. It explains what the Relay dollars support:

1.Cancer research. Among other things, The ACS has funded 40 Nobel Prize winning cancer researchers.
2.Cancer education.
3. I Can Cope-a free educational program providing info about cancer diagnosis and treatemnt. Helps participants deal with physical/emotional challenges.
4. Cancer advocay in all levels of legislature.
5. Reach to Recovery-matching breast cancer survivors with women recently diagnosed.
6. Look Good...Feel Better-Workshops offering women was to look their best during treatment.
7. Wigs and prothesis-Often can offer them free to survivors who request them.
8. Road to Recovery-Transportation to and from outpatient treatment.
9. Man to Man-Provides information and support for men affected by prostate cancer.
10. Cancer Survivor Network-Y'all might have heard of that one!
11. Hope Lodges-Temporary homes for cancer patients traveling far from home for treatment.
12. College Scholarships-Any survivor of Childhood Cancer before the age of 19 and is currently under 25 is eligible for scholarships to two or four-year institutions. Must be a legal resident of Delaware, Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, or Washington, D.C.

Hope that helps!

*hugs*
Gail

snommintj's picture
snommintj
Posts: 602
Joined: Mar 2009

I've been fishing alot. So I've also been doing some thinking. Mostly I've been thinking about how best to help others through my experience. I've been thinking about perhaps being cured. Should I be cured, I'm almost certainly going to have to start over. I had to lease my business to some one else. Since the economy is in the tank I had to take peanuts for it. I had 1 million in insurance and still have over a million in medical bills. I won't say that I was prepared for cancer but I think I was as prepared as any 34 year old could be. I wish I would have bought that disability insurance but other than that there is little else I could have done. So now, at 35, I see myself filing for bankruptcy and navigating a very uncertain financial future. Yes, I'm alive, but I shouldn't be punished twice for the same crime. I would have liked to have been told when diagnosed that I have cancer and whether I live or die I'm going to be broke. Because of the volunteer, today I was specifically thinking about financial support cancer patients get. I considered all of the money cancer generates and then I considered the patient. I looked into the ACS's financial affairs. They are hard to find. The best I can figure is they take in a billion dollars a year. They have a couple of billion in assets and their administrative costs run around 65%. Now I'm not hating on the ACS. I would just like to see some of this cash slow the flow of cash from the patient. Certainly, I don't think there should be a financial reward for getting cancer, but the cash is there. Compiling and distributing information is great, hosting this website is great but combined can't possibly be more than 5% of their billion dollar budget. I know there is much that I am overlooking but if the richest most powerful charity isn't addressing the financial concerns of the patient, who is?

Hatshepsut's picture
Hatshepsut
Posts: 340
Joined: Nov 2006

Somehow I posted this comment so that it appeared mid-thread. I've reposted it below.

Hatshepsut

lisa42's picture
lisa42
Posts: 3661
Joined: Jul 2008

Thanks for the info and thanks, John, for asking a tough question. A lot of people wouldn't dare to "go there".
I've been considering getting involved in my local town of Fallbrook's upcoming Relay For Life, which is scheduled for June. I've had a couple of people, my husband included, ask what I know about how such a large organization utilizes its donations and how many "dollars for dollar" actually go to the cause, what expenses are, how much overhead is there in such a large organization, etc. My husband equated it to people realizing a few years back how all these little girl scouts were selling cookies and some of the higher ups were enjoying "big fat salaries on the sales of little girls' cookies". (now please don't go off on me over my girl scout cookies' comment- it's not something I've verified myself, just something I'd heard said). On the same note, I understand some people's skepticism & so I was glad to see some information on ACS listed out. I'd love to learn even more information- even how much overhead may be there with the actual Relay For Life events vs. if people are volunteers, where the donated money for these events actually goes, etc.
Anyone with more info or comments? I'm not trying to be critical here at all, just learn some more info.
Thanks!

Lisa

2bhealed's picture
2bhealed
Posts: 2085
Joined: Dec 2001

My first Relay for Life was an incredibly emotional experience and I highly recommend attending at least once in one's survivorship. It is overwhelming to see all those lights honoring those here and those who have gone on. I have also been honored as the speaker for our local Relay. With that said, I do have some concerns and criticisms of the whole deal.

At my first Relay the tent was stocked with donuts and pop--not exactly health promoting and definitely cancer promoting. That was my first ARGH. Then I asked the ACS representative where I could find a support group. He had no idea. I thought it would have been helpful for him to at least have done his homework before coming to collect the cash. There was no local support group. A local hospital had a breast cancer support group but I'm colon. I don't go pink, ya know?

If ACS is truly concerned about cancer prevention, then serving junk food at their Relays does not bode well for their reputation. It surely made me think twice and underscores a conspiracy theory that big pharma and ACS type agencies aren't to be trusted in the big picture. I mean, if they're promoting healthy cancer information then why would they give out junkie food?? Actions speak loudly.

The ACS workers are to be commended for the works they do as Scouty so knowledgeably pointed out. I am especially grateful for all the work they do so we can have this website. It has gotten me through many a lonely time on this colon cancer journey. At 39 I didn't know another soul my age going through what I was going through.

So while I want to give them a big THANK YOU for this site, I also want to slap them up the side of their heads for serving donuts and pop at my Relays!!! :-)

peace, emily

PhillieG's picture
PhillieG
Posts: 4907
Joined: May 2005

As long as they keep making Thin Mints and Tag-alongs,
I don't care what they do with their money!

2bhealed's picture
2bhealed
Posts: 2085
Joined: Dec 2001

do you freeze your thin mints? That's the only way to eat them. Of course I haven't had one for 27 years (off refined sugar), but when I did eat them that was the way to go~!

peace, emily

scouty's picture
scouty
Posts: 1976
Joined: Apr 2004

I actually bought my first box of thin mints in 5 years this year since they quit using high frutose corn syrup. I was a girl scout growing up a large family (6 kids) without much money so the only time I got to go to a summer camp was in the 8th grade when I sold the most cookies of all the girl scouts in Charlotte, NC. So I am a softie about them!!! The last few years I just gave them some money without buying the cookies and they didn't really know what to do with it. It was kind of fun.

As far at the food at the Relays, I think it is locale too. When we were in Austin, we were fed all organic food with loads of vegan choices. Here in North Carolina we get b-b-q of course!!!

When are y'all moving? I don't do facebook near as well as you do so send me an old fashioned email.

Love, Lisa P.

PS I laughed out loud at your pink remard because I could "hear" you and your neat accent say it!!!!

2bhealed's picture
2bhealed
Posts: 2085
Joined: Dec 2001

Peanutbutter Patties were my other favorite. You had to gouge out the pnutbutter first and then eat the wafer. I was a GS too but never went off to summer camp since we went to Pawleys Island every summer. Actually, I always wanted to be a Boy Scout! HA! ;-)

I think you're right about locale but you would think the national ACS would want the locals to relect better health and have some input.

I would love to hear your voice, y'all!

love ya!

peace, emily

mono5
Posts: 98
Joined: Jan 2009

Is the American Cancer Society more interested in cancer profit than cancer prevention?
http://www.naturalnews.com/010244.html

lisa42's picture
lisa42
Posts: 3661
Joined: Jul 2008

Hi Mono5,

I did check out and read everything on the link you wrote. It's interesting for sure and definitely causes me to think and wonder, but in all fairness, I do think several statements are unfounded and are just people's opinions and are not facts.

Lisa42

PhillieG's picture
PhillieG
Posts: 4907
Joined: May 2005

but based on how things seem to work in this world, unless there is a buck in it for someone, people do not want to get involved. Look at the Middle East. If they were not sitting on the biggest oil reserve would we really care about them? Look at Darfur, they have nothing to offer people, so few people who could really make a difference for them do anything about their problems.
Not the case 100% of the time but more often than not it seems that if there's no dough, we won't go...
-phil

Hatshepsut's picture
Hatshepsut
Posts: 340
Joined: Nov 2006

Snowmintj:

I agree with you that charities need scrutiny and The American Cancer Society is no exception.

My husband and I use a research site called Charity Navigator to research the effectiveness of charities we support. Here is their site address:

http://www.charitynavigator.org/index.cfm?bay=search.summary&orgid=6495

If you access this site, be sure to read the "About Us" section to evaluate the credibility of the Charity Navigator.

Charity Navigator ranks the ACS as a "good" but not "excellent" charity in terms of the amount of their revenues that go into program support and in terms of their overall efficiency. Their data indicates that about 70% of ACS revenues go into program support and about 9% of their revenues go into administrative costs (a far more reassuring figure than the 65% you cite in your post!). Nevertheless, their CEO compensation is higher than I would like to see and, like you, I would like to see more funds invested into direct patient support. That said, my greatest priority for The ACS is the funding of research that leads to a cure for my husband, for you and for all the other people who are ravaged by this awful disease.

Here is a listing of the data for The ACS, but the data is better formatted if you pull up the site listed above.

American Cancer Society
Dedicated to eliminating cancer

Current Rating Historical Data Comments (39) News
Rating
Overall Rating
(54.75)
Organizational Efficiency
Program Expenses 70.4%
Administrative Expenses 9.3%
Fundraising Expenses 20.2%
Fundraising Efficiency $0.18
Efficiency Rating
(27.04)
Organizational Capacity
Primary Revenue Growth 7.2%
Program Expenses Growth 7.7%
Working Capital Ratio (years) 1.05
Capacity Rating
(27.71)
Income Statement (FYE 08/2007)
Revenue
Primary Revenue $1,039,381,000
Other Revenue $89,778,000
Total Revenue $1,129,159,000

Expenses
Program Expenses $685,270,000
Administrative Expenses $90,591,000
Fundraising Expenses $196,849,000
Total Functional Expenses $972,710,000

Payments to Affiliates $0
Excess (or Deficit) for the year $156,449,000

Net Assets $1,586,732,000
Charts
Expenses Breakdown

Revenue/Expenses Trend

Contact Information
American Cancer Society
250 Williams Street, NW
Atlanta, GA 30303
tel: (800) 227-2345
TTY: (866) 228-4327
EIN: 13-1788491
Mail donations to:
P.O. Box 22718
Oklahoma City, OK 73123
Contact Email
Visit Web Site
Leadership (FYE 08/2007)
Name Title Compensation % of Expenses
John Seffrin Chief Executive Officer $620,581 0.06%
Donor Privacy Policy
Opt-out: We have determined that this charity has a privacy policy which requires you to tell the charity to remove your name and contact information from mailing lists it sells, trades or shares. Opt-out terms and conditions vary from one charity to the next, but all require the donor to initiate the act.
Mission
Founded in 1913, the American Cancer Society (ACS) is the nationwide community-based voluntary health organization dedicated to eliminating cancer as a major health problem by preventing cancer, saving lives, and diminishing suffering from cancer, through research, education, advocacy, and service. With more than two million volunteers nationwide, the American Cancer Society is one of the oldest and largest voluntary health agencies in the United States. Headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia, the ACS has state divisions and more than 3,400 local offices.
Charities Performing Similar Types of Work
Highly Rated Most Viewed
Charity Name Overall Score Overall Rating
American Cancer Society - GA 54.75
International Myeloma Foundation - CA 61.16
Pancreatic Cancer Action Network - CA 63.65
National Cancer Coalition - NC 62.17
American-Italian Cancer Foundation - NY 57.98
Compare These Charities (Highly Rated)
Note: This report represents consolidated financial data for these organizations:

American Cancer Society National Home Office (13-1788491)
American Cancer Society Foundation (13-3615529)
American Cancer Society, Group Return (23-7040934)

BOTTOM LINE:

Their data indicates that approximately 70% of their funds go into program support which earns then a "good" but not "excellent" rating by Charity Navigator.

Hope this helps.

Hatshepsut

scouty's picture
scouty
Posts: 1976
Joined: Apr 2004

Thanks!!

I noticed ACS scored higher than Lance's did which surprised me for some reason. Susan G Komen got an excellent rating which is very impressive given it's size and scope.

Per this info ACS generates roughly $1 billion per year. That sounds like alot but if you consider that as of 2005 11.1 million people in the US were living with a history of cancer (only data I could get but I imagine that number is signigicantly higher today). 1.5 million more Amercians will hear the words "you have cancer" this year alone. So how would you split up the money??

Would you give it to people stressed like you? $1 billion would only help pay 1000 people if you gave them $1 million each. If you helped every newly diagnosed cancer patient they would get $666 each. If they chose to help all cancer survivors, each of us would get less than $90. Bought now, you are probably asking what's your point........

My point is the number of people affected by cancer every year in the US is startling. The ACS must struggle with how to get the most out of every dollar they make. You are not the first nor will you be the last American to have to file for bankruptcy because of not having enough insurance. I'm sorry, it isn't about getting cancer since it could be any number of serious diseases that costs so much money, it is all about insurance! In the richest country in the world we have people going bankrupt because they got sick. Very sad.

NOW if you want to look at some serious hefty salaries go check out the upper management employees at Blue Cross Blue Shield, United Health Care, Cigna, or any of the other big insurance companies and then venture over to what a phamaceutical sales rep makes. The one that represents the company that makes Avastin for my cancer center drives a big Hummer (not one of the small ones). The woman that sells Oxiliplatin, one of those top end Mercedes. If you know your doctor well enough ask him/her what some of the sales reps drive. They'll tell you since they make more than the docs do. But you will never see data on them like you can for ACS because these companies are privately owned and are as greedy and sneaky as Wall Street BUT we all need their products and services. THEY'VE GOT US RIGHT WHERE THEY WANT US.

Lisa P.

CherylHutch's picture
CherylHutch
Posts: 1399
Joined: Apr 2007

I was not going to comment on this topic, mainly because ACS is an American organization that I know very little about... but can only assume it is like the Canadian Cancer Society. It appears the two organizations do the same sorts of programming, education and trying to help as best they can. I'm going out on a limb here but am assuming the ACS is larger and brings in more money than the CCS, but that also can come down to numbers. There are more American citizens in the USA compared to Canadian citizens in Canada.

BUT, the one thing that stuck out in my mind when John first brought up his situation in this topic... about how cancer has basically used up all his finances. He admitted that, prior to having cancer, the insurance he chose to buy, he thought would be more than adequate for future needs for him and his family. I think it's a fairly safe bet that those who do have insurance think the same way... and those that don't have insurance don't have the option of choosing since it's all to expensive for what they can afford. John... in a much earlier topic some months back, you had made the comment that when you chose your insurance coverage, it was back when you really thought it was going to be sufficient coverage and your choice had nothing to do with cost since, at the time, your work and financial means could more than cover it and more if you thought you needed more. Now, after all you've been through in the last 2 (?) years, you find yourself broke, had to sell the business and if you were to buy insurance now, no insurance company is going to touch you unless they charge you such outrageous amounts, there is no way you can afford them. I feel for you and millions of others out there who find themselves in the same boat. And, as Lisa said, it's not just cancer that does this to families... it's any serious illness. When we are young, we feel we are invincible. No matter what serious illnesses are out there, we never think we are going to get them... everyone else gets them but we won't. It's not until someone does get one that reality hits with a bang that has never been felt before.

Most of you have heard my shock (and anger) about health care coverage and how I just don't understand why so many in such a powerful country have to go/suffer without insurance because it's just not affordable. No, don't worry, I am not about to start comparing a National vs a Private system... I think we've beaten that one to death in other topics ;)

BUT... with this topic being about the ACS and what do they do for YOU (the American citizen who is affected with or by cancer)... I feel some underlying tension here from some of you who have posted in it. I could be wrong, but I get the feeling you feel that the ACS is bringing in all this money every year but you, personally, have not seen any benefit or gotten anything out of the ACS. I didn't ever think the ACS, or in my case, the CCS, was ever set up to give financial help to patients or their families. That would be an impossible situation to set up!! Like, who would be eligible for financial help? Everyone who has cancer? Every stage of cancer or would they draw the line and say Stage 1 - 3 isn't eligible because there's a possibility that you can get cured? Or, maybe Stage 1 - 3 can get financial help because of the possibility of being cured so they need more help to get back on their feet and live a long happy life. Maybe it's stage 4 that shouldn't get any help because, after all, statistically speaking, the majority of Stage 4 patients are not going to make it to a long life. Ok, let's say, somehow they make a decision that, as long as you can get an Oncologist to sign a document, then anyone with cancer (all types of cancer, I might add) will get help. What about the family members who are affected by those who have cancer. What about the spouses who quit their jobs to be full time caregivers of there diagnosed spouse, child, parent, etc? Should they also be eligible? As you can see, it's totally impossible! You would need staff to process claims, adjudicate claims, as well as the other programs that go along with that. So you DO have administrative costs. And we are talking 1 or 2 billion dollars is going to come even close to covering this? Think about it.

So why are these illnesses bankrupting more and more people. I really and truly don't think we can blame the economy or current recession on this. People were going broke and bankrupt because of illness long before the problems with the economy or the sub-prime housing fiasco. WHY do people have to go bankrupt because they are sick??

I believe Lisa hit the nail on the head! Not only can people not afford Health Care Insurance that is adequate to cover their illness (or the illnesses of anyone in their family), what insurance they can afford has so many limits and restrictions. So they are paying for insurance but it doesn't cover the serious illness they have. Or it covers, but there is an expiry date... after that date you have to get another insurance plan. But now, no one will touch you because you have a pre-condition. So if you are on your own with no insurance, or only partial insurance, then you are going to have to cover a lot of the prescription/drug expenses yourself. How ridiculous is it to have to spend $500 on a pill to control your nausea (and as some have mentioned here... it doesn't work for everyone!!). So you buy 3 pills as prescribed, for a total of $1500 and then find it doesn't help you??? Or how about that PET scan. Your CEA has gone up and if it is a good indicator for you, it means there is some metabolic activity somewhere in your body. The one good tool to find out is a PET scan... but that costs $5000 - $7000 a scan! You've just put out $1500 for 3 anti-nausea pills, for nausea caused by a chemo drug you are on (that may have cost you $11,000) and now you need to come up with another $6000 for a PET scan. You add up the expenses and it would not be unrealistic for the costs to be approx. $15,000 - $20,000 per chemo treatment... if you have blood tests, CAT or PET scans, plus the chemo treatments and meds to combat the chemo side affects. Standard protocol is 12 treatments which would be over $200,000 (including a couple of CAT scans and 1 or possibly 2 PET scans). And we all know we aren't all lucky for scans/treatments/drugs to stop after 12.

Can we really and truly gripe and say that ACS is not doing a good job because Americans affected by cancer are not getting the financial help they need? Where DOES the problem really lie?

Money. It all comes down to money. The Pharmaceutical industry charges outrageous amounts of money for their drugs. Why? Yes, research and studies are expensive... no doubt about it. By the time they have created a drug that works, incredible amounts of money has gone into making that medication. Once all that work is done, to actually physically make the medication costs peanuts. The manufactoring is rarely the expensive part... it's the research and all the work that went into inventing the drug. Meanwhile... there could very well be alternative solutions but if eating a (made up silly example) dandelion leaf would do the same thing as a $500 pill, is it hard to believe why the Pharmaceutical Industry would be dead against that?? They have no patents or jurisdiction over dandelion leaves. The industry would come crashing down if some solutions were a lot easier and cheaper to manufacture.

Likewise, whether you are talking Health Care Insurance or car insurance... insurance companies all work the same way. The concept is to insure you against a problem (illness, unemployment, or a broken car). They are counting on the fact that the majority of people who have insurance will never have to use it, but are consistently making their payments. For those who do have to use it, there are more that don't so there's plenty of money to pay for those who do. But let's face it... the insurance business is very competitive... the more people Company A has, the more people Company B wants to have. So they add in a few dangling carrots... but of course it costs more... and more... and more. An insurance company is not going to charge only what it takes to cover expenses... they are going to charge a lot more so that there is "profit" that goes into their pockets. Hey, that is what competitive business is all about.

So the successful Pharmaceutical owners and the successful insurance owners all are living the American dream... whereas those who need their services and products are all going bankrupt and actually giving serious thought to "What is the point of fighting when I can't afford it?"

I know it's easy for me to say. I am not in the same position as so many who find themselves bankrupt and scared. They have lost everything and now wonder how they are even going to make ends meet, let alone be able to carry on with the expenses. I'm not in that position, personally, but my heart aches for them... and I do get very angry on their behalf. But what can we do? Heck, I don't even belong to the US so my voice means nothing... but I would join any cause that fights for the right to affordable medical for all Americans, no matter what their illness... or even if they don't have one, to be able to feel secure that they are covered in the future.

Huggggggs,

Cheryl

2bhealed's picture
2bhealed
Posts: 2085
Joined: Dec 2001

Champion Juice @ www.discountjuicers.com = $250.00 -- one time investment
25# bag of organic juicing carrots = $20.00
bag of organic apples = $3.50
Organic celery = $1.75
organic kale = $1.75
_______

$277.00

Health is priceless, but you don't have to file bankruptcy to get there.

Less than one nausea pill and full of cancer curing properties. Until more people REVOLT against BIG BUCK PHARMA we will continue to sell our souls.

peace, emily who said no

2bhealed's picture
2bhealed
Posts: 2085
Joined: Dec 2001

I really don't want the gov't controlling my health care UNLESS they include ALL healing modalities such as acupuncture and massage and vitamins and chiropractic. But honestly, I don't want to pay through the nose so people can eat crap and pop pills, smoke ciggies and push their oxygen tanks. No thanks.

What would you bet that if the gov't were truly concerned about the health of their citizens they would shut down the tobacco, sugar, processed food, soda pop, fast(er to your disease) food industry and start subsidizing local community supported organic farms. What do you suppose the "health care" industry would do with so many healthy people off their meds? To me, that's the travesty of living in this uber rich country--it's all backasswards.

peace, emily (I know this sounds crabby, but until PREVENTION is the focus I don't want my taxes to pay for it)

mono5
Posts: 98
Joined: Jan 2009

Canadian Cancer Society announces national program to prevent cancer using vitamin D. This is interesting... Maybe the ACS should take notes!
http://www.naturalnews.com/021896.html

CherylHutch's picture
CherylHutch
Posts: 1399
Joined: Apr 2007

Well Mono... for starters, that article is pretty old... 2007. And I always am suspicious of articles that slam an organization and yet... haven't started a program themselves if they believe in it so wholeheartedly. I did a google search on Canadian Cancer Society and Vitamin D and pretty much found the same information by different "Natural Health" sites. They all pretty much say that the CCS are starting this National program... and this was all reported in 2007.

I live in Canada and although I have definitely heard the various newscasts about the benefits of Vitamin D (to the point I started taking 2000 units/day last Fall and continue to do so)... I have not seen anything about a national program that these alternative news services say the CCS is doing or has done.

I did a bit more of a search and found this very interesting interview with a Doctor about Vitamin D and he is from the US (San Diego, I believe). I don't know if this is more alternative news or if it is backed by mainstream medicine, but it is definitely interesting. IF there is any truth to it, then it sure doesn't hurt to beef up one's Vitamin D. It's not a hard thing to do.


Interesting Video Clip

If you do a google search for Canadian Cancer Society and Vitamin D, you will come up with a lot of articles... but I advise staying away from any that seem to be bashing a particular group. That goes for any search on the internet. If the sole purpose of the article is to bash another group, then obviously one can only take the information they give with a grain of salt.

Cheryl

angel2251
Posts: 1
Joined: Aug 2009

i agree with u I feel like a ping pong ball, everyone seems to pass the buck, and I have gone nowhere with no help, perhaps good intentions but no help. Extremely frustrating and no one is helping me.

Subscribe to Comments for "ACS"