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Recently diagnosed, surgery on Monday

trainer's picture
trainer
Posts: 242
Joined: Sep 2008

I'm a new member of the club no one wants to be a member of, so, hello. In Sept., a routine colonoscopy turned out to be not so routine in that cancer was found in one of two polyps. I had no symptoms or pains. I'm a type II diabetic and some anemia was noted during one of my 6 month check ups. Thank God I found this discussion group, as I've lurked here, soaking up as much information as possible. You all are great and so supportive of each other. What a community. I love the term "semi-colons" to show membership among those who have had resections.

My surgeon ordered a CAT Scan to see if the cancer had spread any. The location was 80 cm up form the rectum. The CAT scan found nothing to report other than an inflammation near the ileum. So the surgeon, in caution, postponed the surgery and ordered an upper GI with barium. The radiologist couldn't find the site of the inflammation and called the one who did the CAT scan to check on the location. The surgeon didn't think it was anything and when the Upper GI couldn't find it, the surgery was scheduled for Monday, Oct. 20.

I'm sure you've all been where I am, nothing but questions and some fear of the unknown. So far, it would appear the cancer is still contained in the colon and caught early. The surgeon will remove about 18 inches to make certain he's gotten it all. I realize the stage can't be determined until the surgery. The surgery will be done by laparscopy unless there are issues. It will be robotic-assisted, the term used is the DaVinci system or method.

So, please keep me and the surgery team in your prayers and if anyone has any comments on the surgery method or advice on the surgery and recovery period, I'm all ears! Thanks. Mike

PS, what a life-changing development! Thanks for being here.

msccolon's picture
msccolon
Posts: 1956
Joined: Oct 2004

Mike, welcome to the board, and I am praying that the surgery goes easy, peasy and that your recovery is quick and painless. I pray that they caught your cancer early and that God holds you in His arms and comforts you and your family members as you go forward on this journey.
Mary

trainer's picture
trainer
Posts: 242
Joined: Sep 2008

Thanks for your message. Easy, peasy sounds good to me!

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trainer's picture
trainer
Posts: 242
Joined: Sep 2008

Wow, you guys are quick to reply. Thanks for your advice. Tomorrow I start the prep process. I plan on walking as much as I can as soon as I can.

CherylHutch's picture
CherylHutch
Posts: 1399
Joined: Apr 2007

Hey Mike... I had 18 inches of intestine taken out as well. Hahaha... silly me, I thought maybe with that much gone, my appetite would slow down but, silly me, that's your stomach that needs to be smaller... not less intestine!! Oh well... the quest for the ultimate easy diet plan is still my mission in life :)

Now, that's interesting about it being done laparascopically. I will be really interested to hear all about your experience with this. I had the full abdominal surgery where the surgical cut was from pubic bone up just past the belly button (6 years earlier, I had had an abdominal hysterectomy where the surgical cut went from hip bone to hip bone)... so I did tell my surgeon (who I love... he's just so wonderful), "Well, I guess my bikini days are numbered now!" The joke being of course... I'm a full-figure gal and prior to any surgeries you'd never catch me in a bikini .

Mind you, I do have experience with laparascopic surgery. When a PET scan showed my cancer had spread to my right adrenal gland (of all places!), I had my right adrenal gland removed laparascopically. There were 3 very tiny inscisions for the camara and tools, and one slightly larger inscision (about 4 inches) for the removal of the gland and tumour. The surgery went fine, but because of how tricky it was to get at the adrenal gland (one sits above each kidney), the surgery was done on the right side, hence had to go through a lot of muscle, with a lot of digging around... and the inside is pumped with a lot of gas so they can move organs and body parts around so they can get at the area they need to get at. So I guess the worst part of the surgery for me was the pain afterwards... but in hindsight, I think that pain was caused by the gas they injected and you just have to walk that off.

So good luck, my friend, and do come back to let us know how it went!

Huggggggggs,

Cheryl

trainer's picture
trainer
Posts: 242
Joined: Sep 2008

I wouldn't worry about the bikini, just don't wear one! Sorry for all you've had to go through. This will be my first surgery of any kind. I've had a broken arm (fell out of a tree playing Tarzan when I was 6), broken toe from football, tipped a tractor over on me and had a lacerated liver and a broken finger courtesy of some Iranian sailors. Can't tell you about that one. But the bone setting was rather primitive, comprising a towel wrapped around my upper arm and a device resembling one of those Chinese finger puzzles placed over the tip of my finger, and then two burley guys pulling on both ends. I know know what a wishbone feels like on Thanksgiving. So, at least this time, I'll be out.

I read on one of your other emails that you are Canadian. We love going to Vancouver for a getaway weekend. We live in Arizona. A couple of years ago, we took the Rocky Mountaineer form Vancouver to Banff and then a car to Calgary. Great trip. Two years ago, I have two free first class tickets on NW airline, so we flew to Toronto for a winter festival. Great time and very cold. But we enjoyed it.

So, tomorrow starts the prepping procedures and then it's off to the hospital Monday morning. The worst part of all this other than the cold water in the face shock of being told I have cancer, has been the waiting.

Thanks again. I'll check in with the board again once I feel a little better next week and if they'll let me have my computer in the room.

taraHK
Posts: 1961
Joined: Aug 2003

Welcome to this group - so sorry you have cause to be here. It sounds like you are in good hands. Good luck with the upcoming surgery. Your recovery should be much smoother with laparoscopy than traditional surgery. I will pass on the advise I give to anyone facing surgery: (1) make sure you get good pain relief, when you need it. Not just so that you will be more comfortable, but I believe it helps with recovery. (2) as soon as you are able, get up and get walking. Walk regularly -- while you are in the hospital, and after you get out. Again, I believe this helps with recovery. You sound positive and ready -- best of luck to you and please sign in again as soon when you are able to let us know how you are doing.

Tara

trainer's picture
trainer
Posts: 242
Joined: Sep 2008

Walking seems to be a common piece of advice, so since my last name is Walker, it's a natural for me. One question, however, I have been using a treadmill, but it seems that it's rather a jarring experience and I don't think my healing old bod will welcome any hard impact. Plus, I am anticipating a slower pace in the beginning and the treadmill doesn't go all that slowly. Any experience with it or know anyone who tried it?

I read somewhere also there is some kind of an annual gathering or something called a colonopalooza or whatever. Where can I find info on that gathering, if you know?

And in honor of my new Semi-colon membership, once I get healed up, I'm going to get a tattoo of a semi-colon near one of the scars. I made it through nearly 30 years in the Navy without one, but this seems a little more significant. My wife has already ordered a golf shirt with an embroidered semi-colon on it. Some will understand, but others will get curious and ask and that's when I can lay it on them about the importance of getting a screening colonoscopy.

Thanks for your kind words.

msccolon's picture
msccolon
Posts: 1956
Joined: Oct 2004

Mike, I got the colon star ribbon put on my right shoulder, with a butterfly for rebirth. A dear friend put the ribbon on her left shoulder (so we could stand shoulder to shoulder in this fight!), with the chinese characters for friend. My daughters both got the ribbon with some "fireworks" around it and my sisters got it with the chinese characters for little sister inside. Now I have 3 brothers to talk into getting the tattoo, and when she gets a wee bit older, a brand spanking new grand daughter! Good luck with yours and especially with your surgery tomorrow. I will be praying for you and your family.
mary

trainer's picture
trainer
Posts: 242
Joined: Sep 2008

Don't tell me, you also ride a Harley? Have you ever visited a web site called The Colon Club? They produce a calendar each year, or rather, they call it a coloendar. They're well done. Not sure how many they sell, but all the models, male and female are posed, very nicely and modestly, not x-rated, but showing their operation scar. Several have had the star tattooed near their incision. Guess we've all had a wake-up call that lets us know what is important and what isn't. Thanks for your prayers. They will help.

msccolon's picture
msccolon
Posts: 1956
Joined: Oct 2004

ROFL! If you knew me you'd know how funny that one is! In fact, I got the idea for the tattoo from the colondar a few years ago where everybody had the star ribbon air brushed on! I buy that colondar every year for my loved ones! 2009s is a great one again! I was going to get a tattoo of a winding vine around my abdominal scar, which extends from my just below my sternum to just above my pubic bone, but thank God I didn't since I had to go in for a second surgery that went into the same scar! Matching that up on closure would have been fun! I have begun a minor revolution in my church in that I've become a spring board for other women who always thought tattoos were for the underbelly of society! Just yesterday there were 2 women who had gotten small tattoos on their shoulders and they both were raised Baptist! Too funny!

Your wife's knitting will carry her through a lot! I knit and crochet constantly and I always have at least 2 projects going! I got one of my sisters going on the helmets for soldiers project and she is loving it! She hadn't knitted in years! I moved on to caps and prayer shawls from afghans because it's easier to find recipients for those!

Mary

trainer's picture
trainer
Posts: 242
Joined: Sep 2008

I think the twisting vine is a great idea. It is interesting how body art is gaining popularity. However, if you had seen some of the scuzzy tat parlors I've seen in seaports around the world from my time in the Navy, it's downright scary. The characters in the Star Wars bar scene couldn't hold a candle to the people.

OK, well, I'm packed and it's time to go to the hospital. You all will hear from me or Mary in a few days. Thanks for all the prayers.

trainer's picture
trainer
Posts: 242
Joined: Sep 2008

Don't tell me, you also ride a Harley? Have you ever visited a web site called The Colon Club? They produce a calendar each year, or rather, they call it a coloendar. They're well done. Not sure how many they sell, but all the models, male and female are posed, very nicely and modestly, not x-rated, but showing their operation scar. Several have had the star tattooed near their incision. Guess we've all had a wake-up call that lets us know what is important and what isn't. Thanks for your prayers. They will help.

kmygil
Posts: 881
Joined: Feb 2007

Hi Mike, and welcome to the semi-colons. We are all sorry for the reason you are here, but this is the place to be if you want encouragement, advice, tips and positive energy! I hope your surgery goes well and I will pray for you and your medical team. I've heard of the Da Vinci method and I've heard good things about it. For one, you will probably be up & moving very quickly. Even if you don't really feel like it, DO walk as soon as possible. It is also one of the few times in life when passing gas is cause for celebration and bragging! So enjoy farting! Please keep us updated as you walk this road. You have a lot of company!

God bless,
Kirsten

trainer's picture
trainer
Posts: 242
Joined: Sep 2008

Loved your comments. Seeing that I am a typical guy, farting comes naturally. My Grandson and his pals have discovered the joy of flatulence. I got the biggest chuckle while in recovery room of the colonoscopy test. We all were ensconced in those privacy, but not really private curtained off areas. There were about six of us in there, all male. We were laughing so hard, it sounded like echoes in a cave. I think I won the unofficial contest, as one of the med techs poked her head in my space and with a big smile said, "Mr. Walker, you ROCK!"

And of course, the fart jokes started up. I don't think the staff knew what to make of all of us in there. I'm thinking of asking my sister in law to make up a nice little needlepoint sign and give it to the clinic to put up. It would read: Make Us Proud, Fart Out Loud! Humor is healing all by itself, don't you think?

My favorite movie line? I am Farticus!"

So, keep in mind that farting has always been a cause for celebration and bragging whenever a bunch of guys get together.

I like your style of encouragement, keep it coming!

Madre's picture
Madre
Posts: 124
Joined: Apr 2008

I had recsection done by laporoscopy. The worst part was all the gas they pump in you. I had a hard time getting rid of it, it moved up into my shoulders (painfull at times). I had surgery Thursday night and they had me up and walking (8 steps) Friday afternoon. I had a moraphine pump which was heaven, if nothing else it relaxed me so that lower body function worked better. If you get exhausted (from pain or lack of sleep) you won't heal well, so take advantage of being in the hospital where people take care of you 24/7. Good luck to you and prayers coming your way. Welcome to the board.

trainer's picture
trainer
Posts: 242
Joined: Sep 2008

Interesting comment on the gas dissipation. My wife had one of those hystericalectomies a few years ago and she warned me about the pain from the migration of the gas as it moves around inside. In fact, she said that was the worst part of the operation, according to her. I'm not going to be shy at all about asking for and using painkiller. She said it seemed to migrate to her shoulder area. Guess I'll be finding out about 24 hours from now. Thanks for your prayers. Prayer works, as we all know. I'm weary of being in a holding pattern and anxious to move ahead with this process.

Everyone has been very helpful with their input. It means so much to me and my family.

hopefulone
Posts: 1048
Joined: Jan 2007

Mike, Wishing you good luck on Monday for successful surgery and great results. Keep us posted. God BLess
Diane

trainer's picture
trainer
Posts: 242
Joined: Sep 2008

Thanks. I'm hoping the hospital will allow laptops in the room, so once I get back to some level of alertness and feel like it, I can give reports from the front line, so to speak. I already have an email list of friends and family and I named it "The Semi-colon fan club.

Kanort's picture
Kanort
Posts: 1275
Joined: Jan 2004

Hi Mike,

I know you are probably a little apprehensive tonight, but just think...in less than 24 hours you will have the surgery behind you and can move forward toward complete healing. Your sense of humor will serve you well in the days ahead. I'm glad you found the club that no one wishes to join....WELCOME!!!

I'm sending you my biggest healing hugs!

Kay

trainer's picture
trainer
Posts: 242
Joined: Sep 2008

Kay, thanks. You're amazing. I've seen lots of your messages while I was lurking around the board. Well, right now, I'm as clean inside and out as I've ever been. In addition to the laxative preps and antibiotics they prescribed Hippiclens. Never heard of an antiseptic soap so strong it can ruin your eyes and cause you to go partially deaf if you get it in either eyes or ears. What are they thinking of anyway?

Mary, my wife, has been knitting a nice wool throw to put over me in the hospital. I call it my "cancer cozy." She's amazing as she's only been knitting for a few weeks. She's also been knitting watch caps to send to servicepeople in Iraq and Afghanistan. This colon cancer has hit her hard and she's held up extremely well. Like me, she will be relieved to have the surgery over with and a course of action to follow.

What's the name of your dog? Of all things, we lost our springer a few years ago to cancer. We had her for 14 years. She was a chocolate and white dog, which my daughter named "Her-She" to match her color and play off the Hershey chocolate name.

Time to retire, in more ways than one!

Julie 44
Posts: 479
Joined: Oct 2008

Hey Mike'
I am new at this too. I had surgery on 9/18 to remove a large mass from my colon stage 3. Had many lymph nodes removed also. Going to start chemo next week. So I know exactly how you feel...
The people here have helped me sooo much. Not only with advice but encouragement too..Do yourself a favor and keep reading and writing to people here. Try not to read to much anywhere else because it can really freak you out. Yes we are all different but the thing is here we all went through it one way or another anywhere else you are not sure about what the people write..
Good luck and the main thing to remember is to stay POSITIVE because I know for a fact that if you are not upbeat you will have a much harder time with recovery. My surgon can't believe how quickly I healed and he said it was do to my POSITIVE outlook.
Good luck and try not to let you head get the best of you..We are all pulling for you and remember you will get past this too....Hugs

trainer's picture
trainer
Posts: 242
Joined: Sep 2008

Thanks for your encouragement. It means a lot and is comforting. What a great group. Sorry about what brought you here, though. You're right about the power of positive. What has bothered me is the medical establishment here, while as great as can be about care and skill, doesn't match that skill and care with communication. If it hadn't been for the Internet and Google, I'd not have found this site. Also, there just wasn't enough information available to answer all the questions I had. After all, how hard is it to list some web sites on a sheet of paper?

But, now that I have it, I feel more engaged and much of the fear of the unknown is gone. In addition, my brother in law is an MD, so he has been a great source for me. He can't practice anymore since he now has Parkinson's disease and I think this development has energized him. He's been heavily involved in Parkinson's research as well.

Thanks so much,
Mike

tootsie1's picture
tootsie1
Posts: 5056
Joined: Feb 2008

Hi, Mike.

Just want to wish you the best on your surgery. Hope you end up with Stage 1 and a quick recovery. We'll be anxious to hear the results.

Gail

trainer's picture
trainer
Posts: 242
Joined: Sep 2008

Thanks for your encouragement, Gail. Much appreciated. FTW, are you from Texas? I'm guessing based on the items on the wall in your photo.

KathiM's picture
KathiM
Posts: 8077
Joined: Aug 2005

Sorry this is so late...I was gone for awile.

I'm sending my best hugs.

Hugs, Kathi

trainer's picture
trainer
Posts: 242
Joined: Sep 2008

Hey, don't use the word "gone" on this board, you'll freak people out! Thanks for the hugs. I'm getting so many virtual hugs that I might not need the "cancer cozy" my wife knitted for me.

Later, Mike

lisa42's picture
lisa42
Posts: 3661
Joined: Jul 2008

Hi Mike,

I love reading all the supportive comments above! This site really is a great support to so many people. Anyhow- others gave so much advice already, that all I'd like to add is something I recently read an article about. As you probably know, you don't get the green light to go home from the hospital until they know your digestive tract is working again. They want you to have passed gas and/or a bowel movement. I've recently read that chewing gum in gets your digestive tract going & a recent study showed that patients that chewed gum in the hospital went home, on average, a day to day and a half sooner than non gum chewers. Apparently, chewing the gum is like chewing food, which a signal to the body to start the digestive process down below. Just something to try- leaving a day sooner might not be bad after you've been there several days!!

Best wishes to you-
Lisa

trainer's picture
trainer
Posts: 242
Joined: Sep 2008

Thanks for the reminder on chewing gum. I read about that on this web site and looked it up in the AARP Bulletin. It was a study in England that showed the positive results. I asked my surgeon's office about that and they agreed it was a good thing to do, but not until the day after the surgery.

Here we go!

krystiesq's picture
krystiesq
Posts: 242
Joined: Jun 2008

You & the team of docs taking care of you are in my prayers today for a speedy recovery. I laughed outloud reading your responses above and the, make us proud...haha. That is hilarious. Be well!

peace

trainer's picture
trainer
Posts: 242
Joined: Sep 2008

Recently I shared with you of my recent dx of cancer and the need for a colon resection. Surgery was yesterday and I'm in the hospital now recovering. It started off with the DaVinci, but the surgeon could find no cancer, so he had to go the long route of opening me up. He still couldn't find any cancer or tumors and he took out five inches a precaution from the site.
He says this means unless the lab finds something that the gastro got all the cancer out in the polyp removal on Sept. 9. So, needles to say, my family and friends are greatly relieved and so am I.
Than k you for your prayers. Prayer is powerful and really works. I'm anxious of course to get the lab results back as final confirmation. I realize there is no such thing as final confirmation, as it could reoccur. Nevertheless, I am a lifetime semicolon and will be a regular contributor to the site. I'm still under morphine so I hope this all make sense.
Mary, my wife, who is typing this for me may want to confirm it in her own words for you.

Mary speaking, it's amazing to me how much support Mike has gotten from your group. It's truly a lifeline. My heartfelt thanks to all of you for caring and sharing. I praise God for the cancer being gone. I believe it was a miracle from God.
In His Peace.
Mary

KathiM's picture
KathiM
Posts: 8077
Joined: Aug 2005

That's why they say that colorectal cancer is truly a preventable cancer...the earlier it's caught, the better survival there is!!!

Congrats, Mike!!! And Hugs to you, Mary!!!

You will need to watch things, including a repeat colonoscopy in a year, but it sounds sooooo good!!!!! Thanks for sharing!!!!

BIG hugs, Kathi

msccolon's picture
msccolon
Posts: 1956
Joined: Oct 2004

That is such good news I know you two have to be relieved! Prayers of thanks going up to Him who holds us all in His hands! I pray Mike recovers quickly and is back to his normal routine soon! Mary, you have got to feel like a huge burden has been lifted from your shoulders!
Mary

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CherylHutch's picture
CherylHutch
Posts: 1399
Joined: Apr 2007

Alright Mike!!! That is most excellent news!!! And you make perfectly good sense when you are drugged up , so maybe this stay in the hospital won't be so bad after all!!! .

But seriously, I am soooo happy to hear your news and ya, so you have to wait for all the official lab results, reports, etc. to know officially that everything is good.... I figure if the surgeon couldn't find anything while he was in there, then you are doing great... and will do even better in your recovery because you have so much to be happy for!!

And as much as I am thrilled that everything is great, I'm really happy that you are going to stick around and post with the rest of us. Your sense of humour is greatly appreciated... and your positive outlook!

Mary... I don't know if you have a separate internet account of your own or not, but we would LOVE to have you join us too. You are a caregiver and you have gone through the terror with Mike, so that makes you more than eligible to join our merry band of semi-colons and their full stops :D

Many, many good wishes to both of you... and thank you soooo much for checking in so early with us all!!

Huggggggs,

Cheryl

changing2
Posts: 118
Joined: Jul 2008

Thanking God with you!

Kanort's picture
Kanort
Posts: 1275
Joined: Jan 2004

Hi Mike,

Your initial report sounds wonderful, and I pray that the pathologist confirms the surgeon's findings. I bet you are already up walking the halls and getting stronger each day. Let us know when you get the final lab findings.

Hugs,

Kay

kmygil
Posts: 881
Joined: Feb 2007

Beautiful news!!! Early catch, early cure! You are a testament for testing early and often. This news just tickled me pink! Bless both of you and don't be strangers here.

Hugs and Dancing,
Kirsten

trainer's picture
trainer
Posts: 242
Joined: Sep 2008

I haven't been active on this board lately, as I had a colon resection on Monday. Didn't realize how debilitating the big incision method was going to be. Have had some slowness in getting my system back on line. But the good news is, I'm going home in the morning. Been on clears for the past couple of days once my NG tube and bladder catheter were removed. I get a kick out of the nurses calling them "tubes" while I call them "hoses" which is a definitely more accuarte description. So glad they're out now.

Each day has been an almost 100 percent improvement from the day before. Let's have a big round of applause for morphine. Page management was essential and I soon learned to keep it active. Hard drugs scare me, but in this case, it was most welcome.

And since it took almost a week to get the reading back, but when it came in from the lab, it was glorious. I'm officially a 100% cancer free zone. It looks like either the gastro. got it all in the polyp or God performed a miracle as the surgeons couldn't find anything. Either way, I'll take it!

Neither am I so foolish to think I've gotten off scot-free. I was very fortunate and know that it can come back. Of course, I'll be vigilant from now on. I'm too sore to whoop and holler right now. And I don't think it has completely sunk in that within a 30 day period, I've been dxd with cancer and then to be given a NED report. Physically, it hurts like hell. I am 61 and a type 2 diabetic, which often results in a longer healing period, no matter what. I stubbed my big toe at Ft. Bragg and it took over a year to heal and get the new nail grown in. Do you realize those Army folk jump out of perfectly good airplanes for a living? They are awesome.

So, just wanted to drop a note here and pass on the good news to all of you. You all are great and I'd still be flying blind on this whole colon cancer deal without your sharing of your wisdom and experiences. Thanks.

KathiM's picture
KathiM
Posts: 8077
Joined: Aug 2005

YEA YEA YEA YEA YEA YEA YEA!!!!!!

Naked happy dance!!!!!

I am soooooo happy....I've been holding my breath since Monday (and my blue face is none too pretty!!!lol!!).

Take it slow with your recovery. My surgery found the same...no cancer...but that was after pre-surgical chemo and radiation....

I've been cancer free ever since!!!!

BIG hugs,
Kathi

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CherylHutch's picture
CherylHutch
Posts: 1399
Joined: Apr 2007

Awwwwright!!! What excellent news!!! I am absolutely tickled pink to hear your news!! So, between Kathi's blue face from holding her breath and my pink face from being tickled by your report... you've got quite the colourful cheerleading team on your side. :)

Now... you have had some pretty darn major surgery so don't go being a hero now... you make sure you take lots of time to heal and then more time to rest after the healing :)

I hope this doesn't mean we don't see you anymore??? Your humour is hilarious and we need that around here!! We will even give you your own cheerleading skirt and pom-poms so you can join Team Semi-Colons Cheerleading Squad :D

Hugggggs,

Cheryl

trainer's picture
trainer
Posts: 242
Joined: Sep 2008

Hey, wearing a skirt and using pom-poms wasn't enough to keep me out of the draft in 1967, so bring it on. However, I accept only crimson and blue colors, colors from my alma mater, the U. of Kansas.

I appreciate the reminders on several points. Not only is this a club none of us want to be in, but once you're in, you should never leave. We are all needed now or will be needed by someone who eventually will find his/her way here, unfortunately. so if you think you've seen the last of me, guess again. This is a wonderful site, darn it!

I know, too that while I'm feeling great about the results, it has been a major trauma to this old bod, and I plan on recouperating nice and easy. I'm also a walking, talking advocate for laparascopic surgery over the "cut in the gut" type. I can't even feel or notice the six incisions from the daVinci machine, but the long incision through layers of muscle (yeah, right, like I've got 6-pack abs) is horrible.

We're at the hospital right now, waiting for the clearance to leave. I met with the two checkout doctors and am waiting on more paperwork. I am looking forward to my own bed for a change, no more constant late night interruptions of sleep and just some familiarity of home.

Guess I'd better sign off. Your photo has Cheryl and Hutch on it, yet you mentioned Kathi's face turning blue. So, who's Kathi and I take it you are Canadians. I live in Scottsdale, Az and we get about 70,000 Canadian winter residents each year. Retail stores start putting up signs to welcome Canadian money. That's a bit crass. I'd just say Loonies are welcome. The people who know what loonies are will get the message. We're looking forward to visiting Canada again, esp. Vancouver. I put in for press credentials for the Winter Oympics, hope they get approved. I produce two national radio programs and write a marketing column for a trade magazine. Kind of my alter ego. Nice to be able to control daily four minutes on more than 500 stations in the U.S. I'm trying to figure out how I can work some screening public service announcements into the shows.

Gotta go for now. Thanks for using your influence to get me on the cheerleading squad! We first have to figure out is Semicolon one word or hyphenated? My daughter is the senior copy editor at the Phoenix AZ daily paper, so I'll get it from here.

Kanort's picture
Kanort
Posts: 1275
Joined: Jan 2004

What a difference a week makes! I am so thrilled to read that your pathology report showed NED!!! Wonderful! I know your nurses are going to miss you and your sense of humor. Just think tomorrow night you will be home sleeping in your own bed....TUBELESS!!!!

Take it slowly and heal well.

Hugs,

Kay

msccolon's picture
msccolon
Posts: 1956
Joined: Oct 2004

Mike, I am so glad to hear about your excellent recovery and that the surgeon found no evidence of cancer! You and Mary will be dancing and looking back on this time as a distant memory in no time flat!
Mary (the Tattooed lady!)

Moesimo's picture
Moesimo
Posts: 1080
Joined: Aug 2003

Congrats!!!

What great news. I am so happy for you. When you feel better make sure you celebrate.

Maureen

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