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Cancer Info for Newbies

Monicaemilia's picture
Monicaemilia
Posts: 455
Joined: Nov 2006

A friend of mine sent me the following, and although I know most of it (mostly through trial and error), I thought the newbies on this board might find the information helpful. Monica

1. Every person has cancer cells in their body. These cancer cells do not show up in the standard tests until they have multiplied to a few billion. When doctors tell cancer patients that there are no more cancer cells in their bodies after treatment, it just means the tests are unable to detect the cancer cells because they have not reached the detectable size.

2. Cancer cells occur between 6 to more than 10 times in a person's lifetime.

3. When the person's immune system is strong the cancer cells will be destroyed and prevented from multiplying and forming tumors.

4. When a person has cancer it indicates the person has multiple nutritional deficiencies. These could be due to genetic, environmental, food and lifestyle factors.

5. To overcome the multiple nutritional deficiencies, changing diet and including supplements will strengthen the immune system.

6. Chemotherapy involves poisoning the rapidly-growing cancer cells and also destroys rapidly-growing healthy cells in the bone marrow, gastro-intestinal tract etc, and can cause organ damage, like liver, kidneys, heart, lungs etc.

7. Radiation while destroying cancer cells also burns, scars and damages healthy cells, tissues and organs.

8. Initial treatment with chemotherapy and radiation will often reduce tumour size. However prolonged use of chemotherapy and radiation do not result in more tumour destruction. When the body has too much toxic burden from chemotherapy and radiation the immune system is either compromised or destroyed, hence the person can succumb to various kinds of infections and complications.

9. Chemotherapy and radiation can cause cancer cells to mutate and become resistant and difficult to; destroy. Surgery can also cause cancer cells to spread to other sites.

10. An effective way to battle cancer is to starve the cancer cells by not feeding it with the foods it needs to multiply.

CANCER CELLS FEED ON:

A. Sugar is a cancer-feeder. By cutting off sugar it cuts off one important food supply to the cancer cells. Sugar substitutes like NutraSweet, Equal, Spoonful, etc are made with Aspartame and it is harmful. A better natural substitute would be Manuka honey or molasses but only in very small amounts. Table salt has a chemical added to make it white in colour. Better alternative is Bragg's aminos or sea salt.

B. Milk causes the body to produce mucus, especially in the gastro-intestinal tract. Cancer feeds on mucus. By cutting off milk and substituting with unsweetened Soya milk cancer cells are being starved.

C. Cancer cells thrive in an acid environment. A meat-based diet is acidic and it is best to eat fish, and a little chicken rather than beef or pork. Meat also contains livestock antibiotics, growth hormones and parasites, which are all harmful, especially to people with cancer.

D. A diet made of 80% fresh vegetables and juice, whole grains, seeds, nuts and a little fruits help put the body into an alkaline environment. About 20% can be from cooked food including beans. Fresh vegetable
juices provide live enzymes that are easily absorbed and reach down to cellular levels within 15 minutes to nourish and enhance growth of healthy cells. To obtain live enzymes for building healthy cells try and drink fresh
vegetable juice (most vegetables including bean sprouts)and eat some raw vegetables 2 or 3 times a day. Enzymes are destroyed at temperatures of 104 degrees F(40 degrees C).

E. Avoid coffee, tea, and chocolate, which have high caffeine. Green tea is a better alternative and has cancer-fighting properties. Water: it is best to drink purified water, or filtered, to avoid known toxins and heavy metals in tap water. Distilled water is acidic, avoid it.

F. Meat protein is difficult to digest and requires a lot of digestive enzymes. Undigested meat remaining in the intestines become putrefied and leads to more toxic build-up.

G. Cancer cell walls have a tough protein covering. By refraining from or eating less meat it frees more enzymes to attack the protein walls of cancer cells and allows the body's killer cells to destroy the cancer cells. Some supplements build up the immune system (anti-oxidants, vitamins, minerals, EFAs etc.) to enable the body's own killer cells to destroy cancer cells. Other supplements like vitamin E are known to cause apoptosis, or programmed cell death, the body's normal method of disposing of damaged, unwanted, or unneeded cells.

H. Cancer is a disease of the mind, body, and spirit. A proactive and positive spirit will help the cancer warrior be a survivor. Anger, unforgiveness and bitterness put the body into a stressful and acidic environment. Learn to have a loving and forgiving spirit. Learn to relax and enjoy life.

I. Cancer cells cannot thrive in an oxygenated environment. Exercising daily, and deep breathing help to get more oxygen down to the cellular level. Oxygen therapy is another means employed to destroy cancer cells.

(PLEASE FORWARD IT TO PEOPLE YOU CARE ABOUT)

LOUSWIFT
Posts: 372
Joined: Aug 2006

Goodstuff to be sure and most of it may even be right for some people some of the time. It forgets the one universal truth and that is we are all not the same or are cancers, their treatement, or their effects. I think its great to get out this info but these conditions for cancer development, growth and prevention isn't suggesting that if we all do this that you'll get cancer or cure cancer for everyone- is it?. The numbers over population doesn't suggest this. Still since no one has the answers to our problem looking at possibilities is a good thing.

Monicaemilia's picture
Monicaemilia
Posts: 455
Joined: Nov 2006

You are so right Lou. Someone once asked me "Do you know why it is so hard to find a cure for cancer? Because it is such an individual disease". That comment made a lot of sense to me, especially reading the many stories on this forum. This last week alone there was an article on how deaths related to cancer are dropping in the States, while here in Canada, there has been no significant drop. I could speculate as to the reasons, but it would just be that, speculation. We just have to keep on fighting and use every resource at our disposal. Monica

CAMaura
Posts: 719
Joined: Feb 2005

Thank you! Really nice and much appreciated. Hands down, this is MY favorite type of posting! And, no matter how strongly I am trying to improve my entire lifestyle, I LOVE to have it reinforced...I NEED the reminders and the motivation!
Thanks again and all the best to you - Maura

scouty's picture
scouty
Posts: 1976
Joined: Apr 2004

Nicely put. Thank you and like Maura, the reinforcement is always helpful.

Lisa P.

pink05
Posts: 553
Joined: Mar 2006

Thank you for sharing this info. with us. It reinforces all of the things I have learned since my father was diagnosed about a year ago.

God bless,

-Lee-

valeriec's picture
valeriec
Posts: 350
Joined: Oct 2006

Thanks Monica, very impowering and modivating.
God bless-
Valerie

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66Rose
Posts: 58
Joined: Dec 2006

Since I am new I am unaware who CSN Guy is, a moderator?!

First off I LOVED the post Monica, says it all.

And I beg to differ with CSN Guy on point #9.

I know first hand this is true, or should I say that 3 of my doctors told me this could happen during surgery, or were they plagued by the myth?

One can read into this from several angles. They first went to get my tumor in May of 2006, and did not remove it, but gave me a lovely ileostomy. The reason they did not touch it was concurred by all 4 of the surgeons in the room at the time. If they touched the tumor, it was so big and not "stable" and trying to remove it would make it worse i.e. spread, break apart etc. Sounded logical to me, but who am I am? They were the experts. So to me it means doing surgery on it would make it worse.

So we waited, tried one Chemo for 2 months, did not work to shrink it, and then went to radiation and 5FU and Whala it shrank! Then back into surgery on October 2nd, they took out that nasty ole tumor, margins were clear, tumor came out very nicely, they were pleased.

So here comes the intriguing part that makes some want to think hmmmmmm. So here this CSN guy who seems to be connected with the ACS he says that it is a myth that cancer spreads during surgery, ok lets say he is right, then about 75% of the Chemo given to people after surgery should not be? Not including Stage IV people. Remember I am not advocating this but simply trying to understand what he said.

Because according to my oncologist my surgery was a success, they got the tumor, margins were clear, nodes clear BUT because of this so called myth that most doctors believe, during surgery a piece could have been left behind, to small to see and it is floating around my body, Chemo needs to be done to find this rogue cell/cells and kill it so it will not grow again. I met with my oncologist on Wednesday and said this very thing to him so I completely understood why he wanted to do Chemo, and he concurred again for the fourth time I asked, he wants to chase a cell that could have or not have been knocked lose during surgery. And as I have said here before I am liking my odds of not going after that cell or cells, again I am STAGE II OR III, that silly node involvement can't be verified.

So does anyone else see this dilemma that CSN Guy has produced, or have our Western Doctors fallen into the myth too? Well at least my Western Doctors? Because my doctors told me cancer can spread because of surgery.

Just as we discussed earlier about someone reading our posts and saying I can survive stage IV with no Chemo. We are not medical board, just a sharing board.

I would love to be set straight, in a nice way pretty please.

And for the record again I LOVED Monica's post and print it off and have it on my desk.

God Bless,

Liz

StacyGleaso's picture
StacyGleaso
Posts: 1250
Joined: Mar 2003

FYI....

the CSN guy, or Jose, as we know him, is a vital link to this web site. It is the hard work of him, Dana, and Greta (the founder of this site) who make our discussion pages, chats, and web pages possitle. They work diligently to make sure that information passed through the use of this site is accurate. They work diligently to make sure that folks aren't using this site or its discussion boards as a bible in which to dictate their course of action without any consideration for their personal need or that of medical influence.

I do not believe that Monica meant any harm. But you have to consider that when people read things, they automatically tend to jump on bandwagons and sometimes that isn't good. In a nutshell, the chemo vs no chemo is one debate I would never jump back into. Burn me once, shame on you....burn me twice, shame on me! lol But I think sometimes people read things in search of an "easier" way to treat cancer. Not saying that emily's food lifestyle is easy....my hat goes off to her as I doubt I could ever be that disciplined! lol But if merely eating more veggies cured cancer, don't you think everyone would be cancerfree? There comes a time when medicine may and should come into play. And would it be the surgery causing more cancer or the fact that some cancer spreads, no matter how hard you try to strangle it? Because by NOT removing the tumor surgically, there is a real reason to think it could spread because it's left there to travel.

Anyway....don't misinterpret....I'm not bitter, just feeling the need to defend my pal, Jose.

Hugs,
Stacy

66Rose
Posts: 58
Joined: Dec 2006

All I wanted to know was who he was, you answered that question THANK YOU! And I just wanted my question answered about #9.

And we could debate forever about how we eat in America, and yes I do think how we eat attributes to cancer rates, along with smoking drinking and lack of exercise.

I was guilty before my diag, although was not as bad as the average person. And now I am changing that!

I had a VERY YUMMY Carrot, Apple and Garlic fresh pressed juice today, yum!

God Bless,

Liz

JADot's picture
JADot
Posts: 720
Joined: Jan 2006

Hi Liz:

Garlic in the juice!? That's some strong brew! Whew, that should keep vampires away.

Let me take a stab at your concern with #9 above.

You said:

"So here comes the intriguing part that makes some want to think hmmmmmm. So here this CSN guy who seems to be connected with the ACS he says that it is a myth that cancer spreads during surgery, ok lets say he is right, then about 75% of the Chemo given to people after surgery should not be? Not including Stage IV people. Remember I am not advocating this but simply trying to understand what he said."

I think it's fair to say that if someone is having cancer surgery, that person has already had cancer, and that their surgery is life-saving, and critical to giving their bodies a fight chance to win again. During surgery, I can imagine when a drop of blood rolls from one spot to another, and it had cancer cells in it. But the original post, at least to me, seems to imply that cancer surgery is a considerable cause of spread of cancer. I think this is very misleading.

The 75% number which you cite on people taking follow up chemo, I don't think it's accurate to attribute all of it to cancer cells knocked loose by surgery. It is simply impossible to remove every cancer cell by surgical means, ever, to no fault of the surgeon; it's just the nature of the disease. When a tumor grows in your body, connected to your lymph system and your blood vessels, and it discharges the crap it creates into your blood stream, stuff gets around, to use a laywoman's term. These lurkers, rogues cells cannot be eliminated by surgery. That's why it's important to have follow up treatments, be it chemo or lot of vitamin and garlic.

So, without putting words in Jose's mouth, I am sure he was re-iterating the American Cancer Society's position on the importance of cancer surgery as a key lifesaving treatment, and that it is not a prime cancer spreading villain.

To summarize, can cancer cells be knocked loose during surgery? Sure, I am easily see that. Should one avoid surgery? I don't think so. What are the shortfalls of nutrtion programs? Not mentioned in the original post. What if nutrition alone doesn't work? Not mentioned in the original post. To me, and a few others here, the data and advice seemed very one sided and therefore misleading. If we are talking responsible risk assessment, something should be said about the risk associated with no surgery and no chemo as well.

I myself have had surgery, just days before a complete obstruction. I've also had chemo for 6 months. I am a passionate vegan, I take supplements, I exercise, and most of all, I believe that it's never this or that. A healthy diet and life style is a natural compliment to conventional cancer treatments, they are not mutually exclusive, and there is no need to bash one thing to extol the virtue of the other.

And I might add, the list A-I is great. I live by most of them daily. Monica, thank you very much for sharing this list. It pulls together a lot of things in one spot for a pretty comprehensive reference, and it is great information for newbies. However, the list 1-11 is fraught with misinformation. But again, I don't for a moment think that you didn't offer the post with the best of intentions. If anything, a healthy discussion every now and then is a way for us to all learn new things. So please don't take personal offense is what I said. The only personal fight I have is with cancer.

Hope this makes sense!

Cheers,
Ying

spongebob's picture
spongebob
Posts: 2599
Joined: Apr 2003

Liz -

You want fries wit dat Buggs Bunny-Dracula frappe?

Don't forget that one cool feature of CSN is that folks can create a personal page. If you don't know who someone is, what their personal cancer journey is, or where they are coming from on a particular issue you can always check out their personal page to gain some insight and perspective.

CSN doesn't really have a moderator per se. We tend to moderate ourselves. The important thing here is that we - as you demonstrated so well - can disagree and discuss and maybe agree to respectfully disagree. That's what's important; discussion and respect.

So... you gonna share the recipe for that juice concoction or you gonna keep it under lock and key!?

- SpongeBob

66Rose
Posts: 58
Joined: Dec 2006

I am learning when to duck and run around here! Trying not to take everything personal, although I tend to at times.

Many have said and I totally agree, we all have our own stories and our own way of doing things, when someone ask for information I tell my story and it is my journey, not intended for anyone to follow my journey, we all have our own paths to follow, what makes us feel comfortable. For me my journey and what I have chosen to do makes me feel comfortable.

I love reading everything you all post and I may not agree, but something someone does might sound interesting enough to check out.

I would never criticize someone for continuing Chemo treatment when their body is frail, or for doing Chemo at all. Heck I have done two types of Chemo, if you want to read the *&^% I have been through, read my web page, sorry I do not have one here yet, I am working on that. I in return would appreciate not being told I was reckless for not doing Chemo after surgery or how dare I not follow standard protocol, not saying that anyone has said this to me.

I still feel I am new to this awful disease, please be gentle with me. My understanding and I could have misinterpreted my doctors, was that cancer cells could get knocked lose and spread in surgery.

And on Yahoo groups, there are moderators, so that is why I used that term.

I am not angry, so I hope you do not think I am.

I like your note SpongeBob and I am very curious if there is a resemblance to the "real" SpongeBob?! Maybe if I make to Nashville I can find out.

My recipe for carrot juice is easy......6 carrots, one apple and one clove a garlic, Whala!

God Bless,

Liz
www.runlizrun.com

Betsydoglover's picture
Betsydoglover
Posts: 1254
Joined: Jul 2005

Ying -

I'd also like to add that when folks are labeled Stage III, it is because some local lymph nodes were found to be positive for cancer. They don't remove and examine every single local lymph node during colon surgery. So, if some are found to be positive, it is safe to assume that more positive ones remain. Thus the need for some kind of follow-on treatment. It might be nutritionally based, it might be chemo. But, with Stage 3 you can't be at all sure that "all the cancer" was removed. Even with Stage II, there are now more clinical trials aimed at adjuvant treatment. Because of course, maybe there is that one lymph node you didn't exam that has cancer cells in it. Not trying to scare anyone, just trying to help answer Liz's question.

Take care all,
Betsy

StacyGleaso's picture
StacyGleaso
Posts: 1250
Joined: Mar 2003

Kinda on the nutrition note...I wonder how Lance Armstrong, one of the greatest athletes in history, got cancer. Talk about a healthy eating lifestyle and (his words) living the life of a Monk! Yet he got it anyway. Go figure.

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JADot's picture
JADot
Posts: 720
Joined: Jan 2006

Hi Jose:

You guys do a marvelous job at running this board which has been a life line to me as I fought my battle! You guys are awesome! Thanks for doing what you do!

Cheers,
Ying

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spongebob's picture
spongebob
Posts: 2599
Joined: Apr 2003

Dude!

Working on a Saturday? At like 7 pm?? I hope you're getting paid overtime!

Thanks for your comments!

Anonymous user (not verified)

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LOUSWIFT
Posts: 372
Joined: Aug 2006

I would suggest that what the CSN guy was saying is that if you have a personal experience and direct knowledge that something works for you or was bad for you go ahead and share it. I posted mine because what monica* posted appeared to be advocating a possible treatment/prevention etc. without the benefit of saying it worked or didn't work for her. I don't believe this was her intent but I do agree that when we share information especially for newbies that this is just information and not absolute fact. i.e. "surgery causes cancer". I haven't seen a post from anyone where this actually happened. My Chemo was intended to kill those cells that can not be detected. They may or may not even be there. The chemo I recieved after surgery was to decrease my chances of having a reoccurrance. eitter suggests it happened in her/his case. But was it the surgery or the possibility that the surgery site would not get all the existing cancer. In my case floating cancer cells were always a possibility I expect thats why they look everywhere during surgery and take nodes out to look at them. Lymph sys/nodes are generally the cancer highway to other areas. I hope this helps from my view. Maybe if we all listed a quoate from Dennis Miller "I could be wrong". I think we all have had experience with doctors who turned out to be wrong. I guess thats why they are doctors and not God.

Monicaemilia's picture
Monicaemilia
Posts: 455
Joined: Nov 2006

Oops...it seems that my post has upset a few people and that was never my intention. I just thought some of the points were very good, and I wished I had been told of them a year ago when I was dx'd. On a personal note, although the post mentions surgery and chemo on a negative note, although I have to admit it is nothing I have not heard before, I'll be the first one in line to cut anything out that will make me NED. I will be much more careful in posting in the future. Monica

JADot's picture
JADot
Posts: 720
Joined: Jan 2006

Monica,

No worries, I don't think any of us are questioning your intentions. As you said, most of the nutrition advises are good and they would be useful to newbies.

The other stuff, since it is posted, then I think there should be a discussion to go along with it. So when the newbies do read it, they can get another POV.

Cheers,
Ying

spongebob's picture
spongebob
Posts: 2599
Joined: Apr 2003

Monica -

I agree with my cohorts - your post was great! The mark of a good post on a discussion board is how much discussion it generates (which is probably why most of my posts are meaningless drivvle that only get 2 or 3 responses!)

Your post was great and sparked a lot of interested chatter. Keep it up! The last thing any of us would want to do through our discussion is make someone less apt to make a posting. If you feel strongly about something, girl, throw caution to the wind and POST IT! Hopefully if people are put off by it for some reason or another, they'll do like their mama taught 'em and just say nothing at all.

Thanks for your EXCELLENT post!

- SB

2bhealed's picture
2bhealed
Posts: 2085
Joined: Dec 2001

Monica!

This is a wonderful compilation of very important info. Thank you so much for taking the time to do this and sharing.

You are singing to the choir here (for me)! :-)

With your permission I want to copy it off to use as a hand-out in my Juicing For Life workshop that I put on at my local coop.

I focus a lot of info on LIVE ENZYMES (which the juices obviously provide) and how important they are to healing a body that is compromised with cancer. It was a delight to read such affirmations.

And yes, all body chemistries are unique so we all respond differently, but trying to balance the body out and give it optimal nutrition that is easily assimilated (through whole foods, veggie juices and avoiding "dead foods" and toxins) we are giving our bodies the best shot at fighting off the cancer cells. No one protocol has all the answers for everyone, but it could be perilous for us to ignore the obvious -- lifestyle and diet changes are non-negotiable when it comes to trying to cure cancer. Period. And why doctors don't see this is still a mystery to me and a travesty.

Thank you.

peace, emily

Monicaemilia's picture
Monicaemilia
Posts: 455
Joined: Nov 2006

Thank you Emily. I was also glad to see some affirmation of a lot of what I have read on this forum. You can go ahead and share the info if you wish, as it was sent to me via e-mail that is circulated as most of these e-mails do to people with interest in the subject. Monica

stage4mom
Posts: 22
Joined: Aug 2006

I would like to thank you too, Monica, for posting this very valuable information. In my opinion, lifestyle and diet changes are a must after a diagnosis of cancer.

And to Emily: Well said, as usual! I couldn't agree more.

Jane

Betsydoglover's picture
Betsydoglover
Posts: 1254
Joined: Jul 2005

Hi Monica (and everyone) -

Regarding the idea that cancer cells "feed on mucus", here is an interesting link (there are many others out there). Cancer cells don't "feed" on mucus, but some of them may produce mucus as a protective mechanism. (In the digestive tract, mucus is essentially a major protective mechanism for normal cells - unfortunately it therefore also protects cancer cells.)

The following article from Harvard about some Dana Farber research is kind of interesting:

http://www.hno.harvard.edu/gazette/2004/04.29/01-mucus.html

Betsy

shmurciakova's picture
shmurciakova
Posts: 910
Joined: Dec 2002

Hi all,
Stacy, Just for the record, I am pretty sure I remember reading in Lance Armstrongs 1st book that he had a crap diet of mostly Mexican food and tequila prior to coming down with cancer. At any rate, I don't think nutrition was one of his strong suits - maybe it is now? I don't know but I do remember him saying he went into some type of a funk at one point and started eating very poorly.

As for a vegan diet, you can be a vegan or a vegetarian and still eat a lot of junk food. Just because something does not contain meat or animal products does not make it healthy.

I think we are all afraid to rock the proverbial boat and say that chemo or surgery are not good. It really depends on the individual situation. Unfortunately these protocols treat everyone as if their situations were the same. What is good for one person maybe not good for another. Where one should do chemo, another does not necessarily need to. Where one tumor is "unstable" and not a good candidate for surgery, another can and should be removed.
I just felt the need to chime in.
-Susan

StacyGleaso's picture
StacyGleaso
Posts: 1250
Joined: Mar 2003

Well said, Susan. Everything cannot hinge on nutrition alone when "getting" cancer. If that were the case, children and infants wouldn't get it. They don't smoke or drink, yet still happens. On the other hand, people can smoke for years and never get cancer, yet some who never smoked a day in their life can get lung cancer. Oh if this thing called cancer only came with an owner's manual, how much simpler it would be! lol

Everyone is different. I personally am grateful I had surgery, chemo, and radiation. I wouldn't change my protocal or outcome for the world. Then again, I was stage 4, and I don't think avoiding surgery was an option.

5 yrs clear and counting,

Stacy

P.S. You joining us in Nashville, Susan? The more the merrier!!!

KierstenRx's picture
KierstenRx
Posts: 249
Joined: Nov 2006

Well said!!!!! Really having trouble staying away from the sugar....

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