I'm Not That Upset?

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Well, last Wednesday I was diagnosed with uterine cancer.  I am going this Wenesday for my first appointment with my oncologist.

At this point, I'm not sure what to be feeling.  Most of the time I am ok.  I don't feel any different than usual... I feel better than usual.  Its almost hard to believe that I have some weird abnormal thing going on inside me.  Especially since my DNC made me stop bleeding all the time.

I hate this waiting, though.  Waiting a week to see what I'm going to have to do about this.  I just don't know anything about what I'm going to have to do for treatment, or how bad this all actually is.  I'm ready to dig in and get this taken care of.

This is a double whammie for me, because I've always wanted to have kids and the thought of having a hystorectomy sucks.  It hit my husband pretty hard too.  And my mom.  I don't know why, but its almost a relief for me because at least I KNOW that I won't be able to have them.  Its a certainty, even if it really sucks.

They all seem more upset than I am at this point, though.

Is this denial?  I mean, I've had a few tears.  And sometimes I just start bawling with no trigger for it.  I don't know.

I feel like I should be more upset, everyone else seems to be.  Maybe its sensible not to be upset yet at this point.  Again, I don't know.

Comments

  • NoTimeForCancer
    NoTimeForCancer Member Posts: 3,388 Member
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    Manywaters, waiting IS the

    Manywaters, waiting IS the worst part.  I am sorry that you are so young to be getting this news, and there are other wonderful women on here who also found out when they were young that a hysterectomy would end thier ability to carry a child who may be able to chime in.

    As far as your reaction?  You can feel whatever you want.  There is no one way to react and, please realize, there are different types of uterine/endometrial cancer. While waiting sucks, you do want to see exactly what you have and work the plan laid out for you. As for your family?  I cannot even begin to imagine what my twin, mother, sisters, and friends were thinking.  I think it is different as the patient as it is for others who care about you. 

    I would recommend that you work with a gynecological oncologist.  They specialize in below the belt cancers, and that is how you want to attack this.  If for some reason your doctor doesn't know one, please let us know and we can tell you how to find one. 

  • It happened to Me
    It happened to Me Member Posts: 206 Member
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    Welcome to the Group of Peach Sisters

    I'm sorry you had to find us under these circumstances.  You have met or will meet a great bunch of women.  You are feeling what many of us do.  We are statistics of one and we each have different paths on our journey.  Some will be similar, some will be vastly different.  I, like you, really didn't have a reaction until after I talked to the gyn oncologist and found out I had a rare aggressive kind of cancer.  Alot of people say, "why me?", I said, "why not me?".  I'm no different from the next person, so it can happen to anyone as cancer is no respector of persons.  I made some choices when I was diagnosed.

    I chose that I would find something to be thankful for everyday, no matter what the situation.  I wanted to come out of this a better person.  I wanted my relationship to My Lord be closer than it already was.  I also wanted to help people understand what it feels like emotionally, physically etc. with someone who has cancer.  I chose to make this horrible journey as fun as I could.  Then, I put my trust in God.   I was never blessed with a husband or children and I came to terms with that a number of years ago.

    You be your advocate.  We are here to support you in any way we can.  We are hoping for the best.  It's ok to have no reaction, or to cry or to laugh or whatever.

    Best advice someone gave me was to only focus on the next event and only focus what you know as fact.  Don't look too far ahead because we don't know what is ahead until we get there. 

    Take care.

    Jeanette

  • Double Whammy
    Double Whammy Member Posts: 2,832 Member
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    Welcome to the Group of Peach Sisters

    I'm sorry you had to find us under these circumstances.  You have met or will meet a great bunch of women.  You are feeling what many of us do.  We are statistics of one and we each have different paths on our journey.  Some will be similar, some will be vastly different.  I, like you, really didn't have a reaction until after I talked to the gyn oncologist and found out I had a rare aggressive kind of cancer.  Alot of people say, "why me?", I said, "why not me?".  I'm no different from the next person, so it can happen to anyone as cancer is no respector of persons.  I made some choices when I was diagnosed.

    I chose that I would find something to be thankful for everyday, no matter what the situation.  I wanted to come out of this a better person.  I wanted my relationship to My Lord be closer than it already was.  I also wanted to help people understand what it feels like emotionally, physically etc. with someone who has cancer.  I chose to make this horrible journey as fun as I could.  Then, I put my trust in God.   I was never blessed with a husband or children and I came to terms with that a number of years ago.

    You be your advocate.  We are here to support you in any way we can.  We are hoping for the best.  It's ok to have no reaction, or to cry or to laugh or whatever.

    Best advice someone gave me was to only focus on the next event and only focus what you know as fact.  Don't look too far ahead because we don't know what is ahead until we get there. 

    Take care.

    Jeanette

    It's simply difficult to comprehend

    I still have a difficult time wrapping my head around the diagnosis.  You feel fine and then they tell you you have cancer!  Really? 

    Wishing you the best of luck as you begin your journey.  This is a strong gorup of women who have lots of support to offer.  So sorry you have to join us, but we are indeed here for each other.

    Suzanne

  • Fayard
    Fayard Member Posts: 438 Member
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    I was diagnosed almost 5

    I was diagnosed almost 5 years ago, and I still cannot believe it!

    I do not remember crying, but very little.

    Almost 4 years after treatment, I cry in the shower.

    It is normal to feel the way you are feeling, but if tears come later them come.

     

    Keep us posted, we are here for you!

  • Manywaters
    Manywaters Member Posts: 3
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    Pills?

    So I went to see my gynelogical oncologist yesterday, and after a pelvic exam, he suggested that I go on progesterone pills for four months, then have another D&C to see if the cancerous cells are reversed.  Its four pills a day... I don't remember what they are called right now.

    Has anyone else heard of this sort of treatment?  It seems very surprising to me.  He said "I bet my mortgage it will work".  He seemed very upbeat.  So upbeat that it made me uncomfortable, as if he wasn't taking it seriously.

  • cleo
    cleo Member Posts: 144
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    4 months and bet the

    4 months and bet the mortgage!!   I would be getting a  second opinion.

  • Sandy3185
    Sandy3185 Member Posts: 229 Member
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    Pills?

    So I went to see my gynelogical oncologist yesterday, and after a pelvic exam, he suggested that I go on progesterone pills for four months, then have another D&C to see if the cancerous cells are reversed.  Its four pills a day... I don't remember what they are called right now.

    Has anyone else heard of this sort of treatment?  It seems very surprising to me.  He said "I bet my mortgage it will work".  He seemed very upbeat.  So upbeat that it made me uncomfortable, as if he wasn't taking it seriously.

    Pills???

    i would definitely go for a second opinion. He not betting his second mortgage, he's betting your life. I'm not a doctor but I have never heard of doing hormone therapy before surgery and/or chemo. i know you are dreading a hysterectomy but your life is imporant and you need to know all your options. Right now you don't even know what kind of cancer you have and how aggressive your treatment needs to be. Sandy

  • Amy S
    Amy S Member Posts: 1
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    Hi. Brand new here.
    I read

    Hi. Brand new here.

    I read your comment Manywaters and feel I need to add my input.

    I was diagnosed with Stage IIIC in July of 2011.  I had a radical hysterectomy, six rounds of chemo (1 every 3 weeks), and 30 days of radiation.  I was 'cancer free' for a year and a half after all the treatments were finally done.

    Last February we found the cancer had metastasized to the lungs and aortic lymph nodes.  My doctor was beside herself as there was little she felt could be done.  She had noted in the pathology report that my tumors were progesterone receptive.  So she took a chance and put me on 300 mgs of progesterone a day.  One month later the tumors showed shrinkage.  One year later, the tumors were completely gone.  She has had success with this treatment in the past; one patient lived an additional 13 years.  I will have to take this medication for the rest of my life, probably at this same dosage.  The side effects are not pleasant, but I would rather live with them than not live. :-)

    One of the intersting things my doctor said to me at my last appointment in December was "...if I had known this would work so well for you, you might not have had to have any other of the treatments."  But how could she, or anyone, know this would work for me?  I don't regret any of my treatment.  I have learned much and grown considerably.

    So. although some may find this treatment unconventional, there are circumstances where it does work. I agree that you should probably have a second opinion in that you have no prior history.  Making sure you have a competent, up to date, savvy doctor is of prime importance during your cancer journey.

    My best wishes.

  • NoTimeForCancer
    NoTimeForCancer Member Posts: 3,388 Member
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    Pills?

    So I went to see my gynelogical oncologist yesterday, and after a pelvic exam, he suggested that I go on progesterone pills for four months, then have another D&C to see if the cancerous cells are reversed.  Its four pills a day... I don't remember what they are called right now.

    Has anyone else heard of this sort of treatment?  It seems very surprising to me.  He said "I bet my mortgage it will work".  He seemed very upbeat.  So upbeat that it made me uncomfortable, as if he wasn't taking it seriously.

    I have read where some

    I have read where some uterine cancers ARE, in fact, treated with hormones:

    Some types of endometrial cancer need hormones to grow. In these cases, hormone therapy is a treatment option. Hormone therapy removes female hormones or blocks their action as a way of preventing endometrial cancer cells from getting or using the hormones they may need to grow. It is usually taken as a pill, but can be given as a shot.

    Since we are not sure exactly what TYPE of uterine cancer you have, he/she may be right.  Definitely it is something for you to think about.  I guess you will want to follow up with questions as:

    - How fast will you know if it is having an effect?

    - What type of cancer do I have that would be treated this way?

    - If the progestrogen doesn't work what kind of effect will the wait (4 months) and hormones have on my cancer?

    Seriously, hormone treatment is an option, but most of us have an agressive form and UPSC cannot be treated with hormones.  In fact, I avoid highly processed soy (I look for soy protein isolates in the ingredients - the closer to the beginning of the list of the ingredients the higher the percentage) because your body can process it as a hormone.  It is controversial, but there have been a few studies on it and my cancer dietician talked to me about it.

    You might also explain that this is not the typical treatment you have been reading about and need to find out more of the TYPE you have.

  • NoTimeForCancer
    NoTimeForCancer Member Posts: 3,388 Member
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    Amy S said:

    Hi. Brand new here.
    I read

    Hi. Brand new here.

    I read your comment Manywaters and feel I need to add my input.

    I was diagnosed with Stage IIIC in July of 2011.  I had a radical hysterectomy, six rounds of chemo (1 every 3 weeks), and 30 days of radiation.  I was 'cancer free' for a year and a half after all the treatments were finally done.

    Last February we found the cancer had metastasized to the lungs and aortic lymph nodes.  My doctor was beside herself as there was little she felt could be done.  She had noted in the pathology report that my tumors were progesterone receptive.  So she took a chance and put me on 300 mgs of progesterone a day.  One month later the tumors showed shrinkage.  One year later, the tumors were completely gone.  She has had success with this treatment in the past; one patient lived an additional 13 years.  I will have to take this medication for the rest of my life, probably at this same dosage.  The side effects are not pleasant, but I would rather live with them than not live. :-)

    One of the intersting things my doctor said to me at my last appointment in December was "...if I had known this would work so well for you, you might not have had to have any other of the treatments."  But how could she, or anyone, know this would work for me?  I don't regret any of my treatment.  I have learned much and grown considerably.

    So. although some may find this treatment unconventional, there are circumstances where it does work. I agree that you should probably have a second opinion in that you have no prior history.  Making sure you have a competent, up to date, savvy doctor is of prime importance during your cancer journey.

    My best wishes.

    Amy, welcome and thank you

    Amy, welcome and thank you for sharing.

  • nempark
    nempark Member Posts: 681
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    Idotic comment!!!

    That comment you do not need to hear at this time.  No Professional should speak like that.  Who knows maybe his medicine may work, but he did not give you the confidence you need at this time.  Please, go get another opinion.  My first Gyn sent me immediately for surgery and told me I did not need Chemo.  Second opinion said definitely I need chemo.  I am now five years after surgery. MMMT 1a grade 3. Take the time and get your second opinion, some ladies on this board even had third opinions.  Hugs!!!! Don't be afraid, this is all part of life, in this Country we are blessed that we have the freedom and the resources to take care of our health.  Hope to hear from you soon!!!

  • HellieC
    HellieC Member Posts: 524 Member
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    Pills?

    So I went to see my gynelogical oncologist yesterday, and after a pelvic exam, he suggested that I go on progesterone pills for four months, then have another D&C to see if the cancerous cells are reversed.  Its four pills a day... I don't remember what they are called right now.

    Has anyone else heard of this sort of treatment?  It seems very surprising to me.  He said "I bet my mortgage it will work".  He seemed very upbeat.  So upbeat that it made me uncomfortable, as if he wasn't taking it seriously.

    Hormone treatement is used in the UK - sometimes!

    Hi

    I live in the UK.  Hormone treatment of the type you suggest is sometimes used here.  But it tends to be for ladies who still want to have children and whose endometrial lining is showing changes e.g. hyperplasia.  I'm not sure if it is used where actual cancer has been diagnosed.  The hormone therapy can reverse these changes in some people and buy enough time to start a family.  I remember asking my surgeon about it at the time of my hysterectomy (but that was back in 2001) and he confirmed that it was sometimes done, but that he thought it was probably not the best strategy for someone who either didn't want children or who had completed their family, as it needed close monitoring by regular D&Cs and a hysterectomy would probably be necessary in the end anyway.

    Depending on your situation, I think I might be looking for a second opinion, too.  It can never hurt to get another view before you make your decisions.

    Kindest wishes
    Helen