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CYBERKNIFE

maggie_wilson
maggie_wilson Member Posts: 596
edited March 2014 in Uterine Cancer #1
sisters,

i was just hearing about cyberknife from a friend when i read a brief post by claudia mentioning it. i have begun looking it up, and it seems a very, very interesting and exciting possibility. i'm sure many of you have heard of it, but, until recently, i hadn't. cyberknife is a very directed radiation that pinpoints the tumor and leaves the healthy tissue alone. instead of maybe 30 regular radiation sessions, cyberknife has up to about 5. anyone interested can google cyberknife and see what she thinks. i'm certainly going to keep it in mind, and talk to my doctors about it. probably the biggest problem with it is that a lot of insurance companies may not want to pay for it. but, it may be worth fighting for. i keep wondering if that could be an option for linda's nodes.

i'd be interested in anyone's experience with cyber knife, or thoughts about it.

thanx, sisterhood,
maggie

Comments

  • lindaprocopio
    lindaprocopio Member Posts: 1,980
    I think this is the same as Gamma Knife & stereostatic radiation
    I think this is the same technology as stereostatic radiation that was brought up at Fox Chase as a possibility for me for that node near my spine. It's primarily used for brain surgery and near artieries and around the eyes, etc, where really fine work is a must. I know as Fox Chase that I would have to go to Bucks County (another SE PA county near Philly), and that locally I would have to travel to the hospital's Wilkes Barre location, so I think it's not something offered at every medical center and must be crazy expensive. I'm pretty sure Fran had Gamma Knife for her recurrence. I definitely plan to explore it when I finish up on Doxil and switch to radiation.

    I'm not supposed to be typing & even the little bit I did yesterday gave me red fingertips and a couple little blisters where my wrist rests on the keyboard, so I'm trying to be good. I took my grankids to a high school fottball game (huge local rivalty) last night. We left at half time and they slept over. I was planning on going to my granddaughter's soccer game this morning but I am WIPED OUT now and think I'll take it easy today. (& You're supposed to stay out of the SUN for 3 days after Doxil infusion & it's a sunny day here). My husband was a little angry with me for going to the game the day after a new-to-me chemo, even though I took my ice packs and iced my hands discreetly while I watched the game. I couldn't CLAP, though (a no no); how wierd!. I find myself a little constipated since the chemo, a surprise since I thought diahrea was more likely with Doxil, so I get to enjoy a high fiber diet again (just no citrus fruits or veggies in case of moiuth sores), but I love a high fiber diet and so am happy about this. (It may just be the "no hot coffee for 5 days after Doxil infusion" that has thrown my bowels off and also that I have been so busy at the wrong time of day when I would ordinarily go, as I am very much a creature of habit. TMI. Sorry.)

    Not supposed to type and I write about THAT! (blush)
  • maggie_wilson
    maggie_wilson Member Posts: 596

    I think this is the same as Gamma Knife & stereostatic radiation
    I think this is the same technology as stereostatic radiation that was brought up at Fox Chase as a possibility for me for that node near my spine. It's primarily used for brain surgery and near artieries and around the eyes, etc, where really fine work is a must. I know as Fox Chase that I would have to go to Bucks County (another SE PA county near Philly), and that locally I would have to travel to the hospital's Wilkes Barre location, so I think it's not something offered at every medical center and must be crazy expensive. I'm pretty sure Fran had Gamma Knife for her recurrence. I definitely plan to explore it when I finish up on Doxil and switch to radiation.

    I'm not supposed to be typing & even the little bit I did yesterday gave me red fingertips and a couple little blisters where my wrist rests on the keyboard, so I'm trying to be good. I took my grankids to a high school fottball game (huge local rivalty) last night. We left at half time and they slept over. I was planning on going to my granddaughter's soccer game this morning but I am WIPED OUT now and think I'll take it easy today. (& You're supposed to stay out of the SUN for 3 days after Doxil infusion & it's a sunny day here). My husband was a little angry with me for going to the game the day after a new-to-me chemo, even though I took my ice packs and iced my hands discreetly while I watched the game. I couldn't CLAP, though (a no no); how wierd!. I find myself a little constipated since the chemo, a surprise since I thought diahrea was more likely with Doxil, so I get to enjoy a high fiber diet again (just no citrus fruits or veggies in case of moiuth sores), but I love a high fiber diet and so am happy about this. (It may just be the "no hot coffee for 5 days after Doxil infusion" that has thrown my bowels off and also that I have been so busy at the wrong time of day when I would ordinarily go, as I am very much a creature of habit. TMI. Sorry.)

    Not supposed to type and I write about THAT! (blush)

    linda: pleeeze, do not respond yet

    i'd be very interested to learn what your doctors have to say about cyerknife when you're ready to explore that option. sounds like you're still managing to have fun, but maybe overdoing it a bit. i'm kinda with your husband on this one.

    the worst part of chemo for me was constipation, which i finally did manage after much trial and error with a couple of stool softeners and two ducolax at bedtime; then i was fine. really, for me, nothing worse. i do know what you mean about being a creature of habit...no worries, remember i'm the one "no detail too small." hope the high fiber works just fine, but do lay off the typing for awhile.....we can all manage a few days on our own out here!

    hugs and sisterhood,
    maggie
  • caregiveria
    caregiveria Member Posts: 2

    linda: pleeeze, do not respond yet

    i'd be very interested to learn what your doctors have to say about cyerknife when you're ready to explore that option. sounds like you're still managing to have fun, but maybe overdoing it a bit. i'm kinda with your husband on this one.

    the worst part of chemo for me was constipation, which i finally did manage after much trial and error with a couple of stool softeners and two ducolax at bedtime; then i was fine. really, for me, nothing worse. i do know what you mean about being a creature of habit...no worries, remember i'm the one "no detail too small." hope the high fiber works just fine, but do lay off the typing for awhile.....we can all manage a few days on our own out here!

    hugs and sisterhood,
    maggie

    Cyerknife
    They talked for 4 months that my wife would have cyerknife until it came time for treatment and they changed thier minds. She is getting regular radation.
  • maggie_wilson
    maggie_wilson Member Posts: 596

    Cyerknife
    They talked for 4 months that my wife would have cyerknife until it came time for treatment and they changed thier minds. She is getting regular radation.

    caregiveria

    did the doctors say why they changed their minds? any information would be helpful.
    thanx
  • viperfred
    viperfred Member Posts: 20
    CyberKnife
    The CyberKnife was invented ay John Adler of Stanford. He wanted to improve on the GamaKnife. In 1994 Stanford started treating brain tumors with the CyberKnife which is a linear accelerator on a robot allowing beams to be delivered from 360 degrees in the x,y and Z axis. In 1999 the FDA approved the CyberKnife for brain and spine tumors. In 2001 the FDA approved the CyberKnife for tumors in all parts of the body.

    The GamaKnife and CyberKnife are much different. The GammaKnife uses a frame attached to the Skull the CyberKnife uses CT/MRI scans to locate markers to accurately aim and deliver a beam of ionizing radiation to the target.

    I was treated May of 2008 with the CyberKnife for prostate cancer. Wonderful invention.

    Here is a link to a patient forum http://www.cyberknife.com/Forum.aspx

    Good Luck!
  • maggie_wilson
    maggie_wilson Member Posts: 596
    viperfred said:

    CyberKnife
    The CyberKnife was invented ay John Adler of Stanford. He wanted to improve on the GamaKnife. In 1994 Stanford started treating brain tumors with the CyberKnife which is a linear accelerator on a robot allowing beams to be delivered from 360 degrees in the x,y and Z axis. In 1999 the FDA approved the CyberKnife for brain and spine tumors. In 2001 the FDA approved the CyberKnife for tumors in all parts of the body.

    The GamaKnife and CyberKnife are much different. The GammaKnife uses a frame attached to the Skull the CyberKnife uses CT/MRI scans to locate markers to accurately aim and deliver a beam of ionizing radiation to the target.

    I was treated May of 2008 with the CyberKnife for prostate cancer. Wonderful invention.

    Here is a link to a patient forum http://www.cyberknife.com/Forum.aspx

    Good Luck!

    viperfred

    thanx so much for the helpful information and the patient link. i trust you're now doing fine, hoping that's the case.

    maggie