Decisions, Decisions

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  • Kongo
    Kongo Member Posts: 1,166 Member

    Interesting Meyers-Briggs Profiling
    Here is what I think I should be:

    ESFP
    Outgoing, friendly, and accepting. Exuberant lovers of life, people, and material comforts. Enjoy working with others to make things happen. Bring common sense and a realistic approach to their work, and make work fun. Flexible and spontaneous, adapt readily to new people and environments. Learn best by trying a new skill with other people.

    But, here is what I tested to be:

    ESFJ
    Warmhearted, conscientious, and cooperative. Want harmony in their environment, work with determination to establish it. Like to work with others to complete tasks accurately and on time. Loyal, follow through even in small matters. Notice what others need in their day-by-day lives and try to provide it. Want to be appreciated for who they are and for what they contribute.

    Here is what I feel my partner would test out to be:

    INFP
    Idealistic, loyal to their values and to people who are important to them. Want an external life that is congruent with their values. Curious, quick to see possibilities, can be catalysts for implementing ideas. Seek to understand people and to help them fulfill their potential. Adaptable, flexible, and accepting unless a value is threatened.

    Here is what they say you are:

    ENTJ
    Frank, decisive, assume leadership readily. Quickly see illogical and inefficient procedures and policies, develop and implement comprehensive systems to solve organizational problems. Enjoy long-term planning and goal setting. Usually well informed, well read, enjoy expanding their knowledge and passing it on to others. Forceful in presenting their ideas.

    Kinda pretty much what I thought from your writing and thoughts coming through what you wrote. Good Stuff!

    Oh Sorry you had to endure going to Purdue! LOL I was an IU Grad.

    Randy

    Randy
    You test the same as my wife!
  • randy_in_indy
    randy_in_indy Member Posts: 496 Member
    Kongo said:

    Randy
    You test the same as my wife!

    OK, Now I don't know if that's creepy or not?
    LOL Obviously you picked your wife prior to knowing her Myers-Briggs test results....lol
  • Swingshiftworker
    Swingshiftworker Member Posts: 1,013 Member
    Kongo said:

    California Medical Trials Law
    Swing, since you mention UCSF, I am assuming you are a California resident. There is a law in California that if your are participating in a medical trial for cancer at your doctor's recommendation, insurance MUST pay for the costs. (You are still responsible for co-pays, deductibles, etc.)

    There is a Cyberknife trial going on right now and I know that in addition to the Cyberknife center I am considering (Cyberknife of Southern California at Vista), that Stanford, Harvard, and others are participating. If UCSF is also playing in the study, you may not have to wait to switch out your insurance.

    See http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/cancer/clinical_trials/thebigc/pdfs/CC_Clinical_Law_Trial.pdf for much more details.

    Thanks for the support and good luck to you with your choice.

    Thanks for the tip, Kongo .
    Thanks for the tip, Kongo . . .

    but I've already made the switch. Don't think UCSF is participating in the trial and don't want to bother going anywhere else as long as Blue Shield will foot the bill. We'll see what happens in July when the change becomes effective.

    BTW, since you were sharing M-B traits w/Randy, thought you'd be interested to know that I'm an INTJ

    "INTJs are strong individualists who seek new angles or novel ways of looking at things. They enjoy coming to new understandings. They tend to be insightful and mentally quick; however, this mental quickness may not always be outwardly apparent to others since they keep a great deal to themselves. They are very determined people who trust their vision of the possibilities, regardless of what others think. They may even be considered the most independent of all of the sixteen personality types. INTJs are at their best in quietly and firmly developing their ideas, theories, and principles.

    Hallmarks of the INTJ include independence of thought and a desire for efficiency. They work best when given autonomy and creative freedom. They harbor an innate desire to express themselves by conceptualizing their own intellectual designs. They have a talent for analyzing and formulating complex theories. INTJs are generally well-suited for occupations within academia, research, consulting, management, engineering, and law. They are often acutely aware of their own knowledge and abilities—as well as their limitations and what they don't know (a quality that tends to distinguish them from INTPs). INTJs thus develop a strong confidence in their ability and talents, making them natural leaders."

    I think that describes me pretty well, particularly in regards to how I've addressed the PCa problem and my choice of CybeKnife over conventional therapies.
  • Kongo
    Kongo Member Posts: 1,166 Member

    Thanks for the tip, Kongo .
    Thanks for the tip, Kongo . . .

    but I've already made the switch. Don't think UCSF is participating in the trial and don't want to bother going anywhere else as long as Blue Shield will foot the bill. We'll see what happens in July when the change becomes effective.

    BTW, since you were sharing M-B traits w/Randy, thought you'd be interested to know that I'm an INTJ

    "INTJs are strong individualists who seek new angles or novel ways of looking at things. They enjoy coming to new understandings. They tend to be insightful and mentally quick; however, this mental quickness may not always be outwardly apparent to others since they keep a great deal to themselves. They are very determined people who trust their vision of the possibilities, regardless of what others think. They may even be considered the most independent of all of the sixteen personality types. INTJs are at their best in quietly and firmly developing their ideas, theories, and principles.

    Hallmarks of the INTJ include independence of thought and a desire for efficiency. They work best when given autonomy and creative freedom. They harbor an innate desire to express themselves by conceptualizing their own intellectual designs. They have a talent for analyzing and formulating complex theories. INTJs are generally well-suited for occupations within academia, research, consulting, management, engineering, and law. They are often acutely aware of their own knowledge and abilities—as well as their limitations and what they don't know (a quality that tends to distinguish them from INTPs). INTJs thus develop a strong confidence in their ability and talents, making them natural leaders."

    I think that describes me pretty well, particularly in regards to how I've addressed the PCa problem and my choice of CybeKnife over conventional therapies.

    Interesting
    Swing, it will be interesting to compare notes as we go through this.
  • mtguy
    mtguy Member Posts: 22
    Great analysis Kongo
    Kongo - I've read each of your posts with great detail and thank you for sharing your thoughts as well as information you have pulled together. Like you, my wife says I am over-analytical but when I read you put together a matrix you hit a cord with me immediately.

    I was diagnosed April 7 with Stage 1 Gleason 6 and PSA 3.2 at 58 years old. No family history so I am plowing new ground.

    I am very interested in your matrix and wondered if you could share it with me (realizing you have put in your personal considerations, I am interested in what you thought about for attributes as well as a summary of pro/con for each option on the procedures).

    I have been leaning to da vinci operation but cyberknife is the other option I was considering.

    If you can share it minus your personal entries, I would appreciate it greatly.

    [email protected]
  • Kongo
    Kongo Member Posts: 1,166 Member
    mtguy said:

    Great analysis Kongo
    Kongo - I've read each of your posts with great detail and thank you for sharing your thoughts as well as information you have pulled together. Like you, my wife says I am over-analytical but when I read you put together a matrix you hit a cord with me immediately.

    I was diagnosed April 7 with Stage 1 Gleason 6 and PSA 3.2 at 58 years old. No family history so I am plowing new ground.

    I am very interested in your matrix and wondered if you could share it with me (realizing you have put in your personal considerations, I am interested in what you thought about for attributes as well as a summary of pro/con for each option on the procedures).

    I have been leaning to da vinci operation but cyberknife is the other option I was considering.

    If you can share it minus your personal entries, I would appreciate it greatly.

    [email protected]

    Matrix
    MTGUY,

    I'd be happy to send along the matrix but as I am traveling now on the East Coast I won't be able to get to my home computer until Friday. Am sending you an email and perhaps we can chat before then if your schedule permits.

    Best,
  • Kongo
    Kongo Member Posts: 1,166 Member

    OK, Now I don't know if that's creepy or not?
    LOL Obviously you picked your wife prior to knowing her Myers-Briggs test results....lol

    Wife Analysis
    Randy, actually I didn't do a Meyers-Briggs on her but did do the analysis matrix, comparing pros, cons, attributes and trade-offs, side effects, and potential benefits with other candidates...she came out on top. Just kidding, just kidding...if she saw this post I'd be worrying about ED BEFORE treatment!
  • g8rb8
    g8rb8 Member Posts: 18
    Kongo said:

    Excellent Point, Lion
    Lion, your point about being wary of statistics is quite relevant, particularly when researching PCa. If you're the 1 or 2 percent that is affected by a negative consequence, it's 100% for you. On the other hand, if we don't take statistics into account we would find it much more difficult to make objective decisons and would be reduced to antecdotal stories or "gut feels."

    I agree with you too about the guarantees. I think the only guarantee we can safely bet on is that none of us are getting out of this world alive. It then becomes a matter of choosing how we want to spend our days here and whether or not we leave the world a better place for our living.

    I also agree with you that those who have successful treatments tend to move on after a time. It would be great to hear from them and I know there are some who continue to post but more would be better.

    I think all of us in this infamous group should continue to do what we can to educate and support men who will walk in our footprints in the future.

    Kongo,
    It seems that you

    Kongo,

    It seems that you have done a tremendous amount of due diligence. You know the risks and their offsets, but you're concerned about analysis paralysis. I reached a lock-up point in my decision-making process. It took some frank talks with my wife and doctors to clear the path for a plan, but it helped me feel better in the long run that I had done all the calls and reading and questioning. Now, 16 months after my daVinci, I couldn't be happier with the outcomes. I still sweat the PSAs - in fact, I'm waiting on results on one right now.

    Whatever your treatment course, prayers for your personal peace, your family and great outcomes! Turn those last cards up and play the hand.
  • g8rb8
    g8rb8 Member Posts: 18
    One final comment. As to the
    One final comment. As to the "take your time" school of thought, I'm not convinced. In general, yes, PCa is a slow growing type. But not always. I underwent a daVinci RALP less than 90 days after my initial diagnosis at age 45, and in at least one lobe of the gland, the rogue cells were < one-half mm from the gland wall. At my age, none of my doctors recommended watchful waiting for exactly the reason you presented: I'm going to have to deal with this sometime, so it should be at a point in time most advantageous to me, not to the cancer; at a time when it's less developed, has had less time to escape, and I'm in better condition to deal with the procedure and after effects.

    Looking back, I can't imagine giving those cells the extra time to advance that extra one-half mm and start attacking the gland wall.

    Cut it out, nuke it - whatever method you choose, but kill it dead while you can.
  • randy_in_indy
    randy_in_indy Member Posts: 496 Member
    g8rb8 said:

    One final comment. As to the
    One final comment. As to the "take your time" school of thought, I'm not convinced. In general, yes, PCa is a slow growing type. But not always. I underwent a daVinci RALP less than 90 days after my initial diagnosis at age 45, and in at least one lobe of the gland, the rogue cells were < one-half mm from the gland wall. At my age, none of my doctors recommended watchful waiting for exactly the reason you presented: I'm going to have to deal with this sometime, so it should be at a point in time most advantageous to me, not to the cancer; at a time when it's less developed, has had less time to escape, and I'm in better condition to deal with the procedure and after effects.

    Looking back, I can't imagine giving those cells the extra time to advance that extra one-half mm and start attacking the gland wall.

    Cut it out, nuke it - whatever method you choose, but kill it dead while you can.

    G8rb8
    I was very similar having a nodgle and post OP path report had two places less than 1mm from breaking through. I had diagnosis Oct 27th and surgery Dec 29 only 60 days later. Here was my path:

    52 years old
    PSA 9/09 7.25
    PSA 10/09 6.125
    Diagnosis confirmed Oct 27, 2009
    8 Needle Biopsy = 5 clear , 3 postive
    <20%, 10%, 10%
    Gleason Score (3+3) 6 in all positive cores

    11/09 Second Opinion on Biopsy slides from Dr. Koch
    (4+3) = 7 5%
    (3+4) = 7 10%
    (3+4) = 7 10%

    Endorectol MRI with Coil - Indicated the Palpal tumor was Organ confined

    Da Vinci performed 12/29/09 - Dr. Hollensbee & Scott

    Post Surgery Pathology:
    Prostate size 5 x 4 x 3.5 cm Weight: 27 g
    Gleason: Changed to (3+4) = 7
    Primary Pattern 3, 80%
    Secondary Pattern 4, 18%
    Tertiary Pattern 5, 2%
    Tumor Quantitation:
    Greatest Dimension, Largest tumor focus: 19 mm
    Additional Dimension 18 x 15 mm
    Location, largest tumor focus: Right posterior quadrant
    Multifocality: Yes
    Greatest dimension second largest focus 10 mm
    Location: second largest focus: Left Posterior quadrant
    Extraprostatic extension: Yes
    If yes, focal or non-focal: Nonfocal
    If yes: location(s) right and left antero-lateral
    Seminal vesicle invasion: No
    Cancer at surgical margin: No
    If no, closest distance with location: less than 1 mm, right posterior quadrant
    Apex involvement: No
    Bladder involvement: NO
    Lymph-vascular invasion: No
    Perineural invasion: Yes
    Lymph nodes: 9 from right pelvic 0/9 positive
    Stage: pT3a, pNo, pMX
    All nerves sparred - found two additional pudendal arteries

    FIRST PSA TEST 2-11-10 <0.1 NONDETECTABLE

    Virtually Pad free 2-20-10

    Next PSA scheduled for 5-26 Results 6-2-10

    Notes on Recovery: Was at my desk working (from home office – sales) 6 days following my surgery. No pain to speak of (very lucky as many have some pain) I think because I took the Tramadol they gave religiously and found it to be the best drug in the world. BM’s where the trickiest part and most uncomfortable in the early stages but improved with time – follow the diet they give you!...I strayed off and the next BM helped to get me back on track – I like food very hot and spicy - don’t recommend that for at least a month following surgery. Cream soups, mushroom, celery, and chicken worked great the first week following surgery. Mashed Potatoes…Ah the first time following surgery it was heaven!...the first really solid food I ate…..you will learn to appreciate food all over again as you add back your favorites following surgery when the time is right. Take all the help from everyone around you…it might be a while you get that opportunity again to be waited on hand and foot. Liquids are a concern but some affect people differently it seems reading through the discussion board…I found anything carbonated would cause much leaking…alcohol was not good either…but I justified doing it thinking It’s my training method to work on my bladder control!...lol I love homebrewed beers too much! And am an admitted hop head.

    ED path:
    Early on started on Viagra 100mg pills cut into 4ths so 25mg per day dose then a full 100mg on every 7th day.
    Also bought pump and used sporadically to get blood flow to member. Within about three weeks or 5 weeks from surgery (cannot remember but probably posted on CSN somewhere) had usable erections.

    Randy In Indy