Any one ever hear of PAW_PAW???

fuzzytrouble
fuzzytrouble Member Posts: 212
edited March 2014 in Uterine Cancer #1
Someone recently told me about this site to go read about PAW-PAW and so I Goggled it and it brought up a few article's about the research of this fruit and cancer. I haven't read all of the article's yet but wanted to know if anyone here has heard of it before?

Thinking of you all,
Sharon

Comments

  • lindaprocopio
    lindaprocopio Member Posts: 1,980
    I've seen paw paw seeds in garden catalogs.
    I get a lot of seed catalogs and I've seen paw paw seeds somewhere. I didn't ever hear that it was a cancer fighter. I'm sure you remember the old song

    Picking up paw-paws; put ‘em in a basket.
    Picking up paw-paws; put ‘em in a basket.
    Picking up paw-paws; put ‘em in a basket.
    Way down yonder in the paw-paw patch.

    Where, oh where, oh where is Suzie?
    Where, oh where, oh where is Suzie?
    Where, oh where, oh where is Suzie?
    Way down yonder in the paw-paw patch

    (sure I'm not the only one with a Southern grandma that knows this song!)
  • I've seen paw paw seeds in garden catalogs.
    I get a lot of seed catalogs and I've seen paw paw seeds somewhere. I didn't ever hear that it was a cancer fighter. I'm sure you remember the old song

    Picking up paw-paws; put ‘em in a basket.
    Picking up paw-paws; put ‘em in a basket.
    Picking up paw-paws; put ‘em in a basket.
    Way down yonder in the paw-paw patch.

    Where, oh where, oh where is Suzie?
    Where, oh where, oh where is Suzie?
    Where, oh where, oh where is Suzie?
    Way down yonder in the paw-paw patch

    (sure I'm not the only one with a Southern grandma that knows this song!)

    This comment has been removed by the Moderator
  • deanna14
    deanna14 Member Posts: 732
    unknown said:

    This comment has been removed by the Moderator

    Paw Paws
    I live near Springfield Missouri, but my husband was raised about an hour and a half from here. A small town called Duke Missouri, near the Big Piney River. Southeast of Fort Leonard Wood Missouri. We have picked and eaten Paw paws near the river and they do taste sort of like bananas with a different texture. Maybe not the same paw paws of these articles... I don't know.
  • cleo
    cleo Member Posts: 144
    deanna14 said:

    Paw Paws
    I live near Springfield Missouri, but my husband was raised about an hour and a half from here. A small town called Duke Missouri, near the Big Piney River. Southeast of Fort Leonard Wood Missouri. We have picked and eaten Paw paws near the river and they do taste sort of like bananas with a different texture. Maybe not the same paw paws of these articles... I don't know.

    Pawpaw
    This fruit needs a hot wet climate...deep, well drained rich soil. Grows in SE Asia and also in Samoa. Very much a fruit of this area. Have eaten it in Samoa, rich texture, more taste than banana.
  • deanna14
    deanna14 Member Posts: 732
    cleo said:

    Pawpaw
    This fruit needs a hot wet climate...deep, well drained rich soil. Grows in SE Asia and also in Samoa. Very much a fruit of this area. Have eaten it in Samoa, rich texture, more taste than banana.

    Wondering???
    Is that Paw paw that we have picked and eaten here on the banks of the Big Piney River in Missouri, the same Paw Paw you speak of the grows in SE Asia and Samoa?
  • cleo
    cleo Member Posts: 144
    deanna14 said:

    Wondering???
    Is that Paw paw that we have picked and eaten here on the banks of the Big Piney River in Missouri, the same Paw Paw you speak of the grows in SE Asia and Samoa?

    Pawpaw
    I didn't think so deanna so did a web hunt and found the following. The fruit in Samoa is very rich in taste...luscious. You cut in half, scoop and enjoy. Have to say that I have never eaten the seeds, didn't know you could but am not surprised that they could have healing qualities.


    Firstly it is worth noting the different names for the fruit which you are likely to encounter - papaya, pawpaw, papaw and paw paw (and many other combinations involving "p", "w" and "a").

    The fruit grows on trees of the Carica Papaya species which was originally from southern Mexico, Central America and northern South America, but is now cultivated in most countries with a tropical climate, such as Australia, Brazil, India, South Africa and Southeast Asia. The tree which appears in the southern and western states of the USA should not be confused with the Carica Papaya, the USA variety belongs to a different species, Asimina Triloba.

    The Carica is a large tree-like plant, the single stem growing from 5 to 10 meters tall, with spirally arranged leaves confined to the top of the trunk; the lower trunk is conspicuously scarred where leaves and fruit were borne. The leaves are large, 50-70 cm diameter, deeply palmately lobed with 7 lobes. The tree is usually unbranched if unlopped. The flowers appear on the axils of the leaves, maturing into the large 15-45 cm long, 10-30 cm diameter papaya fruit.

    Raw papaya is rich in vitamins, notably vitamins A, B1, B2, B3, B6 and C, and minerals including calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus and potassium.

    The black seeds are edible and have a sharp, spicy taste. They are sometimes ground up and used as a substitute for black pepper. In some parts of Asia the young leaves of papaya are steamed and eaten like spinach. In parts of the world papaya leaves are made into tea as a preventative for Malaria, though there is no real scientific evidence for the effectiveness of this treatment.

    For pawpaw ointment the active ingredient in the papaya fruit is the enzyme papain which is found in the fermented fruit. Papain within the papaya has been used in its native South America and in the last century elsewhere as a topical application to treat various skin ailments.