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Over 30 races, 35 rounds of chemo since cancer came back

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1340
Joined: Feb 2015

Did a couple of running races, including a 1/2 marathon, in the last couple of weeks (virtual and social distant still) while on a chemo cycle of Lonsurf.  Since my cancer came back as inoperable, with mets throughout lungs and in my spine, I have completed over 30 races of various lengths, including 10 triathlons and had over 35 rounds of chemo.  Never did any race or trained until my cancer came back, inoperable late 2017/start of 2018.

Keep on going ...

beaumontdave's picture
beaumontdave
Posts: 1166
Joined: Aug 2013

That's some kind of drive and endurance, in the face of a solid excuse to do very little. I had to work through the Folfox treatments and that had its issues, but I muddled through, then started the work outs after. Two years ago, my ankles [and the podiatrist] made it clear I was on a daily ''step count'', but I knew it was coming for a long time. That's when your hobbies become mainly reading, music, and good movies, lol. The elliptical doesn't wrack my ankles as much as just walking does, so it's a nice place to start back up on. I won't be hitting your levels or distances, but getting in 30 minute hard programs, every other day would suit me fine, and maybe get me back to weights. Congrats on attaining such a high level with your program, that kind of conditioning has to help in the overall fight.................................................Dave

NewHere's picture
NewHere
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Joined: Feb 2015

There are many days where I am tired (especially chemo weeks) and I am really tempted to watch TV and do nothing.  That little voice "Well, you have cancer, it is not like you are making this up."  But then I kick it to the side.  I have gotten better at figuring out if I am so tired I really cannot/should not do something or drag myself to do something.  I am fortunate that I work for myself with my family, so Ihave latitude in that aspect.  I am not sure if I could have worked for others (which I have done ) and been on chemo.  

Reading, music and movies are great hobbies (three of mine :)) and I loathe running.  30 minutes every other day is a great target.  Something to keep in mind - more and more training is based on going slow and not pushing it.  For instance, the runners who can do sub-5 minute miles in the NYC Marathon will train at 10 minute mile pace.  It is a concept of 80/20 training.  80% of training is not driving heart rate too high.  20% is harder/faster workout portions, such as intervals, where speed gains happen.  It is based on heart rate and testing speeds.  The longer workouts are usually at slow paces/lower heart rates.  I am slow even when "racing", so I am a natural :)

 

Real Tar Heel
Posts: 246
Joined: Nov 2019

It has to do with your make-up. I don't do well at distances. After college I tried only running distances and my conditioning (for club soccer) did not improve, and I gained some weight. When I started intervals, every thing improved for me, conditioning, weight, mile time and of course speed.

Canadian Sandy's picture
Canadian Sandy
Posts: 718
Joined: Jul 2016

That is amazing! Keep on going New!

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1340
Joined: Feb 2015

Did 75 miles on the bike trainer, followed by a 3.5 mile treadmill run the other day...  (That was kind of crazy.  Was something that just kept on snowballing.  "I am at 10 miles, can I make 15"  LOL)

SnapDragon2's picture
SnapDragon2
Posts: 574
Joined: Nov 2019

THIS MAKES ME SMILE BIG!!!  Yes, amazing.....

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1340
Joined: Feb 2015

I tell people all the time that I try to smile as much as possible during all this.  Not to say there are not days where there are frowns and bumming, but smiling is a lot better and keeps things positive.

abita's picture
abita
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Joined: Dec 2017

Inspiring!

NewHere's picture
NewHere
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Joined: Feb 2015

I am so happy you started on your elliptical.  We all know how hard to get started exercising in general, and more so with dealing with cancer.  Takes a lot of mental strength to get it going.  Looking forward to all your progress.

SandiaBuddy's picture
SandiaBuddy
Posts: 1186
Joined: Apr 2017

Impressive!  Congratulations, you are an inspiration for all of us.

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1340
Joined: Feb 2015

Your outdoor travels (and great avatars) are awesome.  I look forward to each avatar change and the beautiful outdoors that you see.

SandiaBuddy's picture
SandiaBuddy
Posts: 1186
Joined: Apr 2017

The secret is that I only change avatars with each new hike at Grand Canyon.

Real Tar Heel
Posts: 246
Joined: Nov 2019

That's pretty incredible. I was a sprinter hated anything longer than 400m and only did that because I had to. Always thought the distance runners were off in the head. I'm trying to get off my butt earlier with each treatment and go to the track but it's tough, we know how difficult it is so this is again incredible what you're doing.

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1340
Joined: Feb 2015

I never ran my entire life.  Maybe as a kid playing outside.  And even then sloths felt bad for me with my speed.  I always thought triathlons were cool - I did swim in high school but was not fast - and biked when in school with friends.  Casual around the park, not the spandex pelotons you see on the road nowadays.  But then there was the running.  Yuck.  

Before my lung surgery I was told that the stronger my lungs were, the better it would go.  It was 4 weeks or so from the time it was determined I needed surgery to the surgery, so I did some running then.  And I did a run a week after the surgery, just as part of my stubborn response to all of this.  Then stopped.  (This was September, 2016).   I started my current routine when my cancer was confirmed as back in December, 2017.  And for the record, I am really slow.  People like you who have run make me jealous.  It seems you never lose it.  LOL.  It is crazy.  I have people in my age group going sub 10 minute miles .  A race last week had 24 people go sub 8 minute miles after swimming 1.2 miles and biking 56 miles.  Crazy.  

Yup, it is difficult to get going during treatment, I just mentioned that myself in the other thread that Abita has on the eliiptical - really psyched for her that she has got that going on.

Real Tar Heel
Posts: 246
Joined: Nov 2019

Yes, they are crazy, I was lucky to run a sub 7 minute mile in high school. My coaches thought I was so lazy, I was just not training effectively.

Real Tar Heel
Posts: 246
Joined: Nov 2019

There should be a fitness specific board on here

PamRav's picture
PamRav
Posts: 323
Joined: Jan 2017

You are so inspiring.  I can't tell you how many times I think of you when I want to skip the yoga, or the walking.  (Im not a runner, I get my miles in by walking. ).

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1340
Joined: Feb 2015

A lot of training is supposed to be low heart rate/less stress.  Just gave an example in another thread - the runners who do sub 5 minute miles at the NYC marathon will often train at 10 minute miles to get distance/base.  I have done two hour walks on the treadmill when I had chemo pump plugged in (when on FOLFORI) to keep HR down and not cause the chemo to go fast.  Professional triathletes have mentioned a hike with their family and friends count as part of their training.  So walking is very cool.  When I was on FOLFOX, I did a lot of walking at baseball games wandering around stadiums.  I would not even realize it, but depending on the day would see I wound up with 3 miles often.  Sometimes a lot more.  It was not that I was intentionally exercising.  It was more that I just wanted to move around a bit.

Trubrit's picture
Trubrit
Posts: 5493
Joined: Jan 2013

New Here running   Trubrit sauntering .  

I was going to say 'I can't run to save my life'; but several months ago, 2 dogs chased me, and do you know what? I ran to save my life. So, it can be done, but hiking is more my style. 

I admire you tremendously. You are living now, becasue of your determination to not quit.  May we all find our way to stay alive. 

Tru

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1340
Joined: Feb 2015

I need to remember the chasing dog trick for my next race, maybe that will get me faster than a turtle on crutches :)

Hiking is tremendous.  As mentioned to RTH, there are articles about professional triathletes who count hikes as part of training.

Tueffel's picture
Tueffel
Posts: 305
Joined: Feb 2020

Keep up your good work! You are kind of running away from the cancer so it has it very difficult to catch you! ;) so continue and be an inspiration for so many of us here!

Tueffel

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1340
Joined: Feb 2015

When I am running or biking, sometimes out loud or in my head.  Even swimming (that is always in my head.)  I come up with some rather colorful things, using words I would not post here :)  Directed at the cancer and knowing that each step or stroke is keeping things at bay.

Not that I am doing it the entire workout, that would be kind of crazy ;), but if I am getting tired or hitting a hard portion of a workout.  

abrub's picture
abrub
Posts: 2175
Joined: Mar 2010

But biking,  walking or kayaking at least an hour most days., and I feel great.  Thanking you for all of your support.  It means a lot to me.

Alice

NewHere's picture
NewHere
Posts: 1340
Joined: Feb 2015

Is great to do.  All three of those are good exercises.  Plus they work different muscle groups and complement each other.  That is why I like triathlons.  There is also the great part that I now am bad in three things.  LOL.  The rotation of sports also helps offset some downsides.  For instance if you just bike, it can cause certain issues.  But if you also run, it offsets the potential downside of biking. Hope the summer weather is great for you this year and for your kayaking.

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