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Help - Don't Know Where To Start

woodstock99
woodstock99 Member Posts: 117 **

I will try not to write to much or ask too many questions at once.  I am in shock and scared.  I am 68 and learned late today I have endometrial cancer.  Please  excuse typos as I have wet macular degeneration in both eyes and some vision loss and there's no spell check here. 

I started havung vaginal spotting about 6 weeks ago. Other than that no other sympyoms except occasional lower back pain intermittently that just started recentely. 

Internist had me do urine test and culture.  That came back negative.  Took a bit to get into gyno.  Pelvic exam she said was ok and pap test came back negative but vaginal ultrasound showed a small mass attached to uterine lining.  I had BC 5 years ago caught early stage 1 been cance rfree.  Referred to gyno oncologist.

Had hysteroscopy and D&C 2 days ago.  She called late today to say it was cancer.  Next setp is cat scan to determine if it has spread or not as that would determine type of hysterectoromy. 

I was out takimng a walk with my husband when she called and had to put her on speaker outisde.  I thopught I was going to faint.  I wasn't expecting resuyults so quickly.  I didn't know what to ask her.  I think I asked stage but she said she doesn't know. Is getting a cat scan standard?  I am worried I am reading into everything too much.  

I am too frighetened even to strat seraching Dr Google.  I don't really knkw anything and was wondering if theer is someplace to find list of questions to ask her on Monday.  I am in a major city and she is a top gyno onco in an NCO facility so not sure looking for second opinion makes sense. 

I am still working,.  I am the strong one. We have no children and no family where we live.  I am trying to not have a stroke.  I have high BP as it is.  

I was strong and detemrined when I was diagnosed with my BC and opted not to do reconstrcution as I did not want more surgeries.  I just wnated to get back to my life.  I was lucky and I did not have to do chemo or radiation aor take any hormone therapy.  

The past 6 months have been a nightmare.  The macular degeneration diagnosis.  Loss of independnece.  Can't drive.  Developed a bit of agoraphobia.  Have hearing loss but was too vain to get hearing aidds.  And in December at age 67 I learned I was adopted at birth.  I felt like the rug was pulled out from under me.      Now this.  I feel battered and punished and angry but want to fight and survive. 

Appreciate any guidance about next steps and how to navigate through this.  That's all for now. 

There was a great BC site that was a tremendous resource to me 5+ years ago so I am grarteful in advance to all of you.

Thank you.    

Comments

  • cmb
    cmb Member Posts: 751 **
    Dealing with a new diagnosis

    I'm so sorry that you had to find this site, especially after your other cancer experience, the macular degeneration, and the shocking news that you were adopted. No wonder your world feels so upside down right now.

    Having a pre-surgery CT-scan isn't always done, but I know my gynecological oncologist found it helpful in planning his surgical strategy. The surgery results will determine the stage and confirm the type of uterine cancer.

    The FAQ topic listed at the top of the discussion has a link to a couple of forum topics that you might find helpful to read before your appointment on Monday. You can also click on them from here:

    What do you wish someone had told you? 

    Tips for surgery and after? - 

    Please know that we're here to support you as you gone through this difficult time. Come back with any questions you may have.

  • NoTimeForCancer
    NoTimeForCancer Member Posts: 2,928 **
    edited May 22 #3
    woodstock, it is all

    woodstock, it is all overwhelming but try to take a breath.  Lots of good women and family here to support you and lots of ears to listen.

    cmb mentioned it, but I would start by asking to work with a gynecologic oncologist.  They specialize in gyn cancers - they are who you really want to be working with.  Like cmb I had a CT scan prior to surgery as well, a few other tests to prep, but they really won't know anything until they get in there and see what is going on to determine exactly what kind of cancer and stage.  

    Hopefully you will have someone with you to act as a second set of ears and can take notes.  Please, please let us know how you are doing and if you have questions.  Uterine cancer support - chats and such - are not as prevelant as BC, but this is one of a few places you can ask anything. 

    Again, try to take a breath, you are not alone.

  • woodstock99
    woodstock99 Member Posts: 117 **
    edited May 22 #4
    cmb said:

    Dealing with a new diagnosis

    I'm so sorry that you had to find this site, especially after your other cancer experience, the macular degeneration, and the shocking news that you were adopted. No wonder your world feels so upside down right now.

    Having a pre-surgery CT-scan isn't always done, but I know my gynecological oncologist found it helpful in planning his surgical strategy. The surgery results will determine the stage and confirm the type of uterine cancer.

    The FAQ topic listed at the top of the discussion has a link to a couple of forum topics that you might find helpful to read before your appointment on Monday. You can also click on them from here:

    What do you wish someone had told you? 

    Tips for surgery and after? - 

    Please know that we're here to support you as you gone through this difficult time. Come back with any questions you may have.

    Thank you. I appreciate this

    Thank you. I appreciate this and will check these links out.  I had an awful night.  May I ask if there is a way to get notified via email when someone replies to a post?  I tried to look in my settings but I don't see where to turn that on.  Are there any other websites that are recommened?  I also don;t want to overhwlem myself.  I know I need to breathe and try to take one day at a time.  Again thanks in advance and grateful to know I cam find support and resources here.  

  • woodstock99
    woodstock99 Member Posts: 117 **

    woodstock, it is all

    woodstock, it is all overwhelming but try to take a breath.  Lots of good women and family here to support you and lots of ears to listen.

    cmb mentioned it, but I would start by asking to work with a gynecologic oncologist.  They specialize in gyn cancers - they are who you really want to be working with.  Like cmb I had a CT scan prior to surgery as well, a few other tests to prep, but they really won't know anything until they get in there and see what is going on to determine exactly what kind of cancer and stage.  

    Hopefully you will have someone with you to act as a second set of ears and can take notes.  Please, please let us know how you are doing and if you have questions.  Uterine cancer support - chats and such - are not as prevelant as BC, but this is one of a few places you can ask anything. 

    Again, try to take a breath, you are not alone.

    Thank you. I am already

    Thank you. I am already seeeing a gynoclogust oncologist.  Since I had BC my gynocologist referred me ot her as soon as the ultrasound showed the mass and the oncologiust did the procvedures this week.   My husband is wonderful but not akways good at asking questions or remembering things so I need to get back in habit of doing voice memoes on my phone at appointmnets.  He is always an optimist and belives everything will be ok while right now particulalry I am not feeling that way.  I didn't even realize until reading some info last night that they don;t know how bad etc until after the hysterectomy so I guess I have awhile to go so I need to get myself under control.  How long did it take from when you found out until you had surgery and then how long until you had your path and specific diagnosis?  Thank you.   

  • MoeKay
    MoeKay Member Posts: 354 **
    edited May 22 #6
    Diagnosis to Surgery Timeline

    Hi woodstock, welcome, though I'm sorry for your recent diagnosis and the very stressful year you've had.  As they say, sometimes when it rains, it pours. 

    I remember taking a tape recorder to my initial consultation with my gynecologic oncologist.  That was back in 1999, before smartphones.  I found recording the visit helpful, because it was hard for both my husband and me to remember everything after the fact. 

    I knew saving my calendars for more than 20 years would eventually come in handy!  Here's my timeline from diagnosis to completion of surgical pathology report:

    Diagnosis (by gynecologist):        April 26

    Consult with first gyn-onc:           May 4

    Consult with second gyn-onc:     May 5 

    Surgery by first gyn-onc:             May 12

    Completion of path report:         May 17

    I didn't have a CT scan before surgery, but keep in mind that was 22 years ago.  I'm not sure if that was just my doctor's preference, or if scans are more routinely done now before surgery.

    Don't hesitate to ask any additional questions you might have.  Wishing you the best!

     

     

  • Dak82
    Dak82 Member Posts: 92
    edited May 22 #7
    Hang in there!

    My timeline was very similar to what you've seen here already although I did have a pre-surgery CT scan. I believe the CT scan changed the sequence of treatments. My clinical diagnosis was stage IIIC, FIGO Grade 1. After surgery and pathology report it changed to IIIC2, FIGO Grade 3.

    I have viewed the waiting for results as the toughest part of my treatments but I've only been in the fight for 6 months now--my surgery was 1 Dec. You are on a good site. The ladies here willingly offer their experiences and support and love. I hope your test results are good!

    Cheers,

    Deb

  • Forherself
    Forherself Member Posts: 605 **
    edited May 23 #8
    Another welcome, sorry you have to

    You are at a very hard point.  The unknown is VERY hard to deal with. There are many different kinds of endometrial cancer and they have different outcomes.  Endometrioid endometrial cancer has a better prognosis and it is the most common type.  I think your biopsy would include the type of cancer so that would be a question you could ask.  They cannot know the stage until after surgery, and that is hard to wait.  You can click on a person's name to read their story.  My dates are there, and were rather prolonged.   I had a trip to Paris in between diagnosis and seeing the gyne oncologist.  it was already planned so I just went.  And I made flannel pillowcases.  Lots of them.  it diverted me.  Let us know how. you are doing.

    I don't know of any way to be notified of a response to your post either.  Some members are more knowledgable than others on this board and may have suggestions.

     

  • Molly110
    Molly110 Member Posts: 191
    Woodstock, please write as

    Woodstock, please write as much as you want and ask as many questions as you want, and no one cares about typos. :) I am so sorry for what you have been through and what you are going through now.

    I had a CT scan after my D&C and before surgery. The CT scan was on a Friday,  less  than a week after the D&C. I got my results in a couple of days, and the surgery was few days after that. with the surgery pathology results in another couple of days.  I think that's a faster timeline than usual, but I was terrified and wanted to get the whole thing over as soon as possible. I knew before the hysterectomy that I had a rare form of uterine cancer for which chemo and radiation was always recommended, but I didn't know the stage until after the surgery, because a lot of the information they need to stage the cancer comes from what they learn during surgery. I was scared to death of chemo and thought I might rather die quickly than go through chemo, but since the surgery sounded not too difficult, I decided I might as well do it. That was how I handled the whole thing -- one step at a time. I had a wonderful gyn/onc and cancer team, and it sounds like you will, too. It is such an advantage to have access to a major center. 

    As it happened, it was all so much easier and better than I thought it would be. My surgery was robotic, and I had a very quick recovery, which many women do. I was eating lunch at my favorite restaurant two days after surgery and I only needed an alternating combination of Tylenol and Advil for pain for the first two days, then nothing. I decided to do the chemo and had a common regimen of carboplatin and taxol -- 6 cycles three weeks apart, starting three weeks after surgery. The chemo did not make me sick or nauseated, although my care team prescribed medication before the first cycle just in case. I was easily able to work full time throughout chemo, and it was over so much sooner than I thought it would be. 

    My care team held my hand throughout, and no metter what options you choose, you are likely to get that same support at your cancer center. They urged me to let them know about anything and everything I experienced because they said they could help me manage everything, from the surgery to chemo to radiation. Although everyone experiences things differently a major center will have dealt with pretty much every possible reaction. One thing you may want to do right away is to tell your doctor that you are frightened and anxious and angry and ask them for an anti-anxiety medicine like lorazepam or another benzodiazapam that acts right away. I had never taken an anti-anxiety med and didn't really want to when my nurse practitioner said that many women found it helpful. I am so glad I listened to her. I took it from the I was diagnosed until after my first chemo, and it was so helpful. Once I had the first chemo, I knew I could manage the rest.

    You may not need chemo or radiation at all. Many women with endometrial cancer do not. If the idea of chemo is one of the things that is frightening you, I hope it helps to know that there are many women on this site who will be able to help you through it, both with moral support but also lots of concrete tips about how to get through it.

    I know there are many different strategies for dealing with the waiting. Mine was to stay away from the web. Usually I am an avid researcher and want to know everything possible. In this instance, I decided to trust my Hopkins-trained gyn/onc, who I liked and was comfortable with immediately, rather than research things myself. 

    Fingers crossed that you get good news soon.

    Molly

  • cmb
    cmb Member Posts: 751 **
    edited May 23 #10

    Thank you. I appreciate this

    Thank you. I appreciate this and will check these links out.  I had an awful night.  May I ask if there is a way to get notified via email when someone replies to a post?  I tried to look in my settings but I don't see where to turn that on.  Are there any other websites that are recommened?  I also don;t want to overhwlem myself.  I know I need to breathe and try to take one day at a time.  Again thanks in advance and grateful to know I cam find support and resources here.  

    CSN Notifications

    You can set an option to receive an email when another member has sent you a private message (see CSN Email). But I am not aware of any way to receive an email notification when someone has responded to a discussion topic.

    If you are logged in, you'll see the "x new" under the Replies column in the topic list that flags new messages you haven't read yet. Then the word "New" appears in the replies. But the new message may not relate to the post you previously made, but rather to another member's comment. 

  • Primavera
    Primavera Member Posts: 225
    edited May 24 #11
    Hang in there and hope for good news

    I had the spotting long before I had the D&C and results. You might have caught this on time.

    12/2018 Spotting (full month; I didn't know what it was and I was terrified to even find out).

    1/2019: Ultrasound. Thickened endometrium 10mm, somewhat heterogeneous

    2/2019: Biopsy at gynecologist. Not enough tissue (was told this 3 weeks later)

    3/2019: Pre-admission tests for D&C (3/21/19). Got results on 3/27/19: endometrioid adenocarcinoma FICO type 3

     

    15 weeks gone now from first symptom to results. The type of cancer cells is something they can tell you from the D&C. And I remember getting the thickness of endometrium from the ultrasound results. 

     

    3/29/19 Pre-surgery scans. Tiny nodules in lungs and a 3mm lesion in liver. Abdominal and pelvic scans clear.

    4/15/19 Total hysterectomy. Quick recovery.

    5/1/19 Endometrioid denocarcima, stage 1A, type 3. Genetic testing done for Lynch syndrome, one of the breast cancer genes comes as a variant of unknown significance. Got 3 brachytherapy treatments because of the type 3.

    8/27/20 Diagnosed with left breast cancer, stage IIB, overlapping cancers and a lymph node diseased. Got sent straight to chemo. Since then I've had a mastectomy and I'm recovering from it and going through reconstruction soon. This time, I didn't know much and didn't research much. Just went through the motions. I just prayed I didn't have to have radiation and my prayers were answered. Lung nodules have not changed, liver nodule grew to 6mm and I had an MRI this time. They're still saying that it can be a cyst.

    This place was great to keep me calm.

  • woodstock99
    woodstock99 Member Posts: 117 **
    edited May 24 #12
    Thank you all for all your

    Thank you all for all your support and inout so far.  I am scheudled for my cat scan and CA125 blood test this Friday afternnon and the surgeon scheudled me for hysterectormy type TBD for JUne 10th.  I do know she said someothing hwne we spoke last Friday about high grade but she told me not to raed anything into iit.  I have still been to scared to read the catual test result in mychart.  I am having a video call with gyno onco tomorrow afternoon and will try to put my thoughts tigether tonight to ask as many questions as I can.  I wanteed to talk to her in perosn vs phone but vidoe is fine to see her face.  I did have some friends who have medical connections check her out for me and I was told she is one of the top docs and I am in good hands.  When I had BC I got 2 aqdditional opinions from surgeons before making my decision but this is such a different process and I too stressed to even go to someone else.  I am a type A control freak so it is hard for me to let go but I know I need to let her be the captain and trust her.  The wekend was pretty bad.  I am going to ask her to prescribe something to calm me down.  I know I need to be posituve and take things ione step at a time and now I am super terrified of the cat scan and what that may show. I went to have a mani/pedi yesterday and almost passed out from how surreal I felt in a normal enviroinment.  While I almost wish I could just have the surgery tomorrow and be done with it I am also glad I have osme time to get things in some order as best as I can.  I am glad I found this site and will be in touch.  Thank you all so much.  

  • woodstock99
    woodstock99 Member Posts: 117 **
    Primavera said:

    Hang in there and hope for good news

    I had the spotting long before I had the D&C and results. You might have caught this on time.

    12/2018 Spotting (full month; I didn't know what it was and I was terrified to even find out).

    1/2019: Ultrasound. Thickened endometrium 10mm, somewhat heterogeneous

    2/2019: Biopsy at gynecologist. Not enough tissue (was told this 3 weeks later)

    3/2019: Pre-admission tests for D&C (3/21/19). Got results on 3/27/19: endometrioid adenocarcinoma FICO type 3

     

    15 weeks gone now from first symptom to results. The type of cancer cells is something they can tell you from the D&C. And I remember getting the thickness of endometrium from the ultrasound results. 

     

    3/29/19 Pre-surgery scans. Tiny nodules in lungs and a 3mm lesion in liver. Abdominal and pelvic scans clear.

    4/15/19 Total hysterectomy. Quick recovery.

    5/1/19 Endometrioid denocarcima, stage 1A, type 3. Genetic testing done for Lynch syndrome, one of the breast cancer genes comes as a variant of unknown significance. Got 3 brachytherapy treatments because of the type 3.

    8/27/20 Diagnosed with left breast cancer, stage IIB, overlapping cancers and a lymph node diseased. Got sent straight to chemo. Since then I've had a mastectomy and I'm recovering from it and going through reconstruction soon. This time, I didn't know much and didn't research much. Just went through the motions. I just prayed I didn't have to have radiation and my prayers were answered. Lung nodules have not changed, liver nodule grew to 6mm and I had an MRI this time. They're still saying that it can be a cyst.

    This place was great to keep me calm.

    Thank you.  If there is any

    Thank you.  If there is any way I can help you about BC please let me know. I have been NED since Jan 2016 and it seems like a long time ago in some ways but here to help in any way posisble.  

  • woodstock99
    woodstock99 Member Posts: 117 **
    Molly110 said:

    Woodstock, please write as

    Woodstock, please write as much as you want and ask as many questions as you want, and no one cares about typos. :) I am so sorry for what you have been through and what you are going through now.

    I had a CT scan after my D&C and before surgery. The CT scan was on a Friday,  less  than a week after the D&C. I got my results in a couple of days, and the surgery was few days after that. with the surgery pathology results in another couple of days.  I think that's a faster timeline than usual, but I was terrified and wanted to get the whole thing over as soon as possible. I knew before the hysterectomy that I had a rare form of uterine cancer for which chemo and radiation was always recommended, but I didn't know the stage until after the surgery, because a lot of the information they need to stage the cancer comes from what they learn during surgery. I was scared to death of chemo and thought I might rather die quickly than go through chemo, but since the surgery sounded not too difficult, I decided I might as well do it. That was how I handled the whole thing -- one step at a time. I had a wonderful gyn/onc and cancer team, and it sounds like you will, too. It is such an advantage to have access to a major center. 

    As it happened, it was all so much easier and better than I thought it would be. My surgery was robotic, and I had a very quick recovery, which many women do. I was eating lunch at my favorite restaurant two days after surgery and I only needed an alternating combination of Tylenol and Advil for pain for the first two days, then nothing. I decided to do the chemo and had a common regimen of carboplatin and taxol -- 6 cycles three weeks apart, starting three weeks after surgery. The chemo did not make me sick or nauseated, although my care team prescribed medication before the first cycle just in case. I was easily able to work full time throughout chemo, and it was over so much sooner than I thought it would be. 

    My care team held my hand throughout, and no metter what options you choose, you are likely to get that same support at your cancer center. They urged me to let them know about anything and everything I experienced because they said they could help me manage everything, from the surgery to chemo to radiation. Although everyone experiences things differently a major center will have dealt with pretty much every possible reaction. One thing you may want to do right away is to tell your doctor that you are frightened and anxious and angry and ask them for an anti-anxiety medicine like lorazepam or another benzodiazapam that acts right away. I had never taken an anti-anxiety med and didn't really want to when my nurse practitioner said that many women found it helpful. I am so glad I listened to her. I took it from the I was diagnosed until after my first chemo, and it was so helpful. Once I had the first chemo, I knew I could manage the rest.

    You may not need chemo or radiation at all. Many women with endometrial cancer do not. If the idea of chemo is one of the things that is frightening you, I hope it helps to know that there are many women on this site who will be able to help you through it, both with moral support but also lots of concrete tips about how to get through it.

    I know there are many different strategies for dealing with the waiting. Mine was to stay away from the web. Usually I am an avid researcher and want to know everything possible. In this instance, I decided to trust my Hopkins-trained gyn/onc, who I liked and was comfortable with immediately, rather than research things myself. 

    Fingers crossed that you get good news soon.

    Molly

    Thank you Molly.  I wish I

    Thank you Molly.  I wish I could just do it all 1-2-3 and be done. Getting c-scan this Friday afternoon 5/28 and surgeryr scheduled Thueresday 6/10 about 2 weeks later.   I need to stay off the internet with this as there are too many variables and I started really getting worked up this weekend.  I did tell the gyno onco I do wnat info though. I appreciate uyour insights.  

  • Lusafag
    Lusafag Member Posts: 21
    edited June 7 #15
    What next after Surgery.

    Me too,at 57,diagnosed through TVS,and D&C,now surgery done,stage is Pt2b,my radiotherapists differ in their approaches,my wounds after TAH BSO hysterectomy haven't healed completely. Wanted to know where to ask for better advice.

    And feeling in solidarity with you,hope you are better now.

    At what stage of treatment and recovery you are ?

  • Lusafag
    Lusafag Member Posts: 21
    edited June 7 #16
    cmb said:

    Dealing with a new diagnosis

    I'm so sorry that you had to find this site, especially after your other cancer experience, the macular degeneration, and the shocking news that you were adopted. No wonder your world feels so upside down right now.

    Having a pre-surgery CT-scan isn't always done, but I know my gynecological oncologist found it helpful in planning his surgical strategy. The surgery results will determine the stage and confirm the type of uterine cancer.

    The FAQ topic listed at the top of the discussion has a link to a couple of forum topics that you might find helpful to read before your appointment on Monday. You can also click on them from here:

    What do you wish someone had told you? 

    Tips for surgery and after? - 

    Please know that we're here to support you as you gone through this difficult time. Come back with any questions you may have.

    Thank you.

    I will check these links too,hope they help.

    Thank you for answering her,it will help many.

    Regards

  • Lusafag
    Lusafag Member Posts: 21
    edited June 7 #17
    MoeKay said:

    Diagnosis to Surgery Timeline

    Hi woodstock, welcome, though I'm sorry for your recent diagnosis and the very stressful year you've had.  As they say, sometimes when it rains, it pours. 

    I remember taking a tape recorder to my initial consultation with my gynecologic oncologist.  That was back in 1999, before smartphones.  I found recording the visit helpful, because it was hard for both my husband and me to remember everything after the fact. 

    I knew saving my calendars for more than 20 years would eventually come in handy!  Here's my timeline from diagnosis to completion of surgical pathology report:

    Diagnosis (by gynecologist):        April 26

    Consult with first gyn-onc:           May 4

    Consult with second gyn-onc:     May 5 

    Surgery by first gyn-onc:             May 12

    Completion of path report:         May 17

    I didn't have a CT scan before surgery, but keep in mind that was 22 years ago.  I'm not sure if that was just my doctor's preference, or if scans are more routinely done now before surgery.

    Don't hesitate to ask any additional questions you might have.  Wishing you the best!

     

     

    Just to help others.

    I bled in February,7 years after menopause at 50,had TVS,had CT CAP,had MRI,and underwent TAH BSO,I hope everyone understand the terms. Currently waiting for wound healing 2 and a half months after surgery,and differing radiotherapists to decide whether I need just bag.brachytherapy or external beam radiation too.

    I come from Pakistan,have a humble socio economic background,couldn't afford private healthcare,and was a victim of delay and negligence in public sector.

    My current post op stage(2 plus months back) was stage 2.

     

    Don't know whether it has spread or not.

     

    Will learn from all of you.

     

    Regards

  • Lusafag
    Lusafag Member Posts: 21
    Dak82 said:

    Hang in there!

    My timeline was very similar to what you've seen here already although I did have a pre-surgery CT scan. I believe the CT scan changed the sequence of treatments. My clinical diagnosis was stage IIIC, FIGO Grade 1. After surgery and pathology report it changed to IIIC2, FIGO Grade 3.

    I have viewed the waiting for results as the toughest part of my treatments but I've only been in the fight for 6 months now--my surgery was 1 Dec. You are on a good site. The ladies here willingly offer their experiences and support and love. I hope your test results are good!

    Cheers,

    Deb

    Stage IIIC

    And how are you doing now,did you had radio as well as chemotherapies,how soon was your cancer treatment started after surgery.

    Asking because I am being grossly delayed.

    Would learn from your experience.

    And wish you the best.

    Regards

  • cmb
    cmb Member Posts: 751 **
    Lusafag said:

    What next after Surgery.

    Me too,at 57,diagnosed through TVS,and D&C,now surgery done,stage is Pt2b,my radiotherapists differ in their approaches,my wounds after TAH BSO hysterectomy haven't healed completely. Wanted to know where to ask for better advice.

    And feeling in solidarity with you,hope you are better now.

    At what stage of treatment and recovery you are ?

    Next steps

    Lusafag,

    Medical practices do differ amongst different countries. In the United States, the NCCN (National Comprehensive Cancer Network) recommends External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT) for Stage 2 uterine cancer. Vaginal brachytherapy is also an option for grade 1 or 2 cancers, with less than 50% myometrial invasion, and no lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI) and microscopic cervical invasion. In some cases, a patient may receive both types of radiation.

    The NCCN also recommends systematic therapy (e.g., chemotherapy) for Stage 2B patients.

    Have your doctors discussed adding chemotherapy to your treatment plan in addition to the radiation?

    I know that Pakistan is experiencing a high rate of COVID infections right now. That may be one reason why your radiation treatment has been delayed. Cancer treatments for some patients here in the United States were also delayed at various times over the past year.

    I hope that you can start receiving the recommended treatment just as soon as you are recovered from surgery and it's safe to do so at your treatment center.