Very Afraid with Symptoms PLEASE HELP ME

Yag
Yag Member Posts: 5

Here is some background and a timeline: 

 

Last year after a bout of the flu I was diagnosed with an Autoimmune disorder named Parsonage Turner Syndrome, which left me paralyzed for a few months. Since then I have recovered my muscle strength. 

 

Timeline: 

 

1.5 months ago- Following a spider bite I got a mild 99 degree fever for a few hours 

3 weeks ago- Came down with flu-like symptoms for about 3 days (sore throat, congestion, fever, body aches, etc.); After the fever first broke I had some on and off mild fevers of about 99 degrees 

Past few days- Itchy skin intermittent throughout the day at random parts of my body but tonight was mostly near my feet AND chronic fatigue; I feel like I've run a marathon every time I wake up. In addition to this I have bouts of dizziness when I close my eyes while SITTING but NOT when I'm STANDING. Happens when I'm around bright lights sometimes...

HOWEVER: No weight loss, no swollen lymph nodes, and no clear fever for the past week and a half or so...

 

The itches are subcutaneous and are arbitrary and at various places. 

 

Please help me, my doctor takes forever to get back to me and I need help PLEASE!!!

«1

Comments

  • po18guy
    po18guy Member Posts: 1,261 Member
    Only doctor can help. Really.

    Why cancer? That should not even be on your radar, since you have had soooooo many serious infections and an autoimmune condition that explain everything that you are experiencing and more. Cancer would be the LAST thing on my worry list. If you are going to worry, autoimmune conditions and spider bites can be fatal in certain cases - and much much faster than any cancer.

  • Yag
    Yag Member Posts: 5
    po18guy said:

    Only doctor can help. Really.

    Why cancer? That should not even be on your radar, since you have had soooooo many serious infections and an autoimmune condition that explain everything that you are experiencing and more. Cancer would be the LAST thing on my worry list. If you are going to worry, autoimmune conditions and spider bites can be fatal in certain cases - and much much faster than any cancer.

    Based on what I've read...

    I've heard many lymphoma sufferers stating that they've had these low-grade fevers. Furthermore, I forgot to mention that I went to a doctor after that bite and the culture came back negative for my bite. Also I've heard many lymphoma sufferers have stuffy heads and dizziness accompanied by the itches I described which is why I was afraid :(

     

    That and the fatigue that I mentioned...

  • PBL
    PBL Member Posts: 333 Member
    What Po18guy said...

    This is just a forum for mutual information and support among cancer patients - there is really no way we can help you beyond reading your post and replying as Po already has.

    If you have reason to feel concerned about your health, only your doctor is in a position to examine you and diagnose whatever is going on.

    You state that your doctor takes longer than you should wish in getting back to you. Doctors often need time to figure out symptoms, get test results, confer with colleagues, and reach a decision as to the best course of treatment. This is a general problem we have all had to face, and still do face, even with a cancer diagnosis. There is no solution to this - no way to shorten the wait. All the help we can offer here is limited to basic, down-to-earth suggestions, such as:

    - if your situation requires urgent care, try the emergency room

    - if you are dissatisfied with the way your doctor is handling your case, try another doctor. Please consider, however, that constantly changing doctors is more likely to leave "holes" in your medical record, and lead to further delays - or possible errors.

    - if you are unable to manage your anxiety, ask your doctor for a specific prescription. Anti-anxiety medicines can be a great help while facing tests and long waits for results.

    Other, non-chemical means of dealing with the stress of waiting include engaging in enjoyable activities (hobbies, outings, social events...) and relaxing techniques such as massage, yoga, meditation, etc.

    Hope this helps.

    PBL

     

  • Yag
    Yag Member Posts: 5
    edited October 2017 #5
    PBL said:

    What Po18guy said...

    This is just a forum for mutual information and support among cancer patients - there is really no way we can help you beyond reading your post and replying as Po already has.

    If you have reason to feel concerned about your health, only your doctor is in a position to examine you and diagnose whatever is going on.

    You state that your doctor takes longer than you should wish in getting back to you. Doctors often need time to figure out symptoms, get test results, confer with colleagues, and reach a decision as to the best course of treatment. This is a general problem we have all had to face, and still do face, even with a cancer diagnosis. There is no solution to this - no way to shorten the wait. All the help we can offer here is limited to basic, down-to-earth suggestions, such as:

    - if your situation requires urgent care, try the emergency room

    - if you are dissatisfied with the way your doctor is handling your case, try another doctor. Please consider, however, that constantly changing doctors is more likely to leave "holes" in your medical record, and lead to further delays - or possible errors.

    - if you are unable to manage your anxiety, ask your doctor for a specific prescription. Anti-anxiety medicines can be a great help while facing tests and long waits for results.

    Other, non-chemical means of dealing with the stress of waiting include engaging in enjoyable activities (hobbies, outings, social events...) and relaxing techniques such as massage, yoga, meditation, etc.

    Hope this helps.

    PBL

     

    I'm sorry

    My sincere apologies, I did not intend to be an inconvenience. But I guess what I was trying to better understand is these symptoms that lymphoma patients complain about like the itching and the fatigue. And to what extent it must go before one must really worry. 

     

    I truly did not mean to be an inconvenience, and would just like to build insight that i all. But if I've hurt anybody on here I'm sincerely sorry. 

  • PBL
    PBL Member Posts: 333 Member
    No need for apologies

    There simply is a timing error here, as - so far as we understand from what you've said - you have not at this point been diagnosed with lymphoma, and therefore, any symptoms you are experiencing cannot be interpreted as lymphoma symptoms nor be discussed as such.

    Of course, if you should ever be diagnosed with lymphoma, then turning to this or any other patient forum for the purpose of understanding your symptoms, treatment options, side effects, etc. would make sense.

    In the meantime, we wish you the best possible outcome with your current preoccupation.

    PBL

  • po18guy
    po18guy Member Posts: 1,261 Member
    Yag said:

    Based on what I've read...

    I've heard many lymphoma sufferers stating that they've had these low-grade fevers. Furthermore, I forgot to mention that I went to a doctor after that bite and the culture came back negative for my bite. Also I've heard many lymphoma sufferers have stuffy heads and dizziness accompanied by the itches I described which is why I was afraid :(

     

    That and the fatigue that I mentioned...

    Consider...

    Please stop researching a death sentence! Research is good only after you have a diagnosis. And then, only if you stick to the diagnosis and don't go looking for something else. There are 68,069 known human illnesses and conditions. Our bodies are capable of producing about 150 different symptoms. By simple math, that means that each symptom potentially indicates 450+ different illnesses. Two symptoms, double the number and so on. Please allow doctor to do the diagnostics. Do not confuse your web-surfing ability with doctor's medical degree.

    Google is a mortician, not a doctor.

     

  • Yag
    Yag Member Posts: 5
    po18guy said:

    Consider...

    Please stop researching a death sentence! Research is good only after you have a diagnosis. And then, only if you stick to the diagnosis and don't go looking for something else. There are 68,069 known human illnesses and conditions. Our bodies are capable of producing about 150 different symptoms. By simple math, that means that each symptom potentially indicates 450+ different illnesses. Two symptoms, double the number and so on. Please allow doctor to do the diagnostics. Do not confuse your web-surfing ability with doctor's medical degree.

    Google is a mortician, not a doctor.

     

    Thank you sir, I shall take

    Thank you sir, I shall take your advice. I wish you much health, love, and happiness and hope you find peace.

  • po18guy
    po18guy Member Posts: 1,261 Member
    Thoughts and anxiety

    If you suspect that anxiety is playing a role in this, then please raise this issue with doctor. You have enough on your mind without anxious thoughts interfering with your peace! Anxiety treatment is progressing toward therapy more than medication - teaching skills that will help you for the rest of you life - no matter the situation.

  • ShadyGuy
    ShadyGuy Member Posts: 756 Member
    Some answers

    based on my own experience only:

    sweats - the lymphoma night sweats are more than just getting hot and sweating. The ones I had were only at night and I was literally drenched. Had to change clothes and pillow case.

    Fatigue - Much more than just being tIred! My fatigue developed slowly enough that I was surprised when I realized just how fatigued I was. I walked to the mailbox which is about  3/4 mile from my front door and had a very difficult time walking back up the hill. The following week I was at a trade show in San Diego and had to take a taxi two blocks from the Marriott to the convention center. I said whoa, something is really wrong here! Doctor said "you are working too hard".

    Itching- I had very little of this but when I did my entire back itched and I had to scratch it with a dry rough towel. The episodes I had lasted about 1/2 hour.

    The others are right that there is no need to jump to unjustified conclusions. Odds are good that you do not have lymphoma. But get a diagnosis if it worries you. When I was suffering these symptoms I was told by a Doctor, just weeks before diagnosis with stage 4 lymphoma, that it was maybe all in my head. A group of very general symptoms is not a diagnosis. Any given symptom could be from any number of conditions. See a cancer expert. Put your mind at ease.

     

     

  • po18guy
    po18guy Member Posts: 1,261 Member
    ShadyGuy said:

    Some answers

    based on my own experience only:

    sweats - the lymphoma night sweats are more than just getting hot and sweating. The ones I had were only at night and I was literally drenched. Had to change clothes and pillow case.

    Fatigue - Much more than just being tIred! My fatigue developed slowly enough that I was surprised when I realized just how fatigued I was. I walked to the mailbox which is about  3/4 mile from my front door and had a very difficult time walking back up the hill. The following week I was at a trade show in San Diego and had to take a taxi two blocks from the Marriott to the convention center. I said whoa, something is really wrong here! Doctor said "you are working too hard".

    Itching- I had very little of this but when I did my entire back itched and I had to scratch it with a dry rough towel. The episodes I had lasted about 1/2 hour.

    The others are right that there is no need to jump to unjustified conclusions. Odds are good that you do not have lymphoma. But get a diagnosis if it worries you. When I was suffering these symptoms I was told by a Doctor, just weeks before diagnosis with stage 4 lymphoma, that it was maybe all in my head. A group of very general symptoms is not a diagnosis. Any given symptom could be from any number of conditions. See a cancer expert. Put your mind at ease.

     

     

    Stage IV

    In 2008,  a very incompetent internal physician prescribed me anxiety meds for lymphoma. I still have them. In the OP's case, the various and recent afflictions more than explain the symptoms. Lymphoma is almost never an emergency and if it is preent, it will manifest itself. If it does, then one steps up to the fight. Panic, terror and anxiety only give more power to that which does not deserve it. 

  • Max Former Hodgkins Stage 3
    Max Former Hodgkins Stage 3 Member Posts: 3,721 Member
    ShadyGuy said:

    Some answers

    based on my own experience only:

    sweats - the lymphoma night sweats are more than just getting hot and sweating. The ones I had were only at night and I was literally drenched. Had to change clothes and pillow case.

    Fatigue - Much more than just being tIred! My fatigue developed slowly enough that I was surprised when I realized just how fatigued I was. I walked to the mailbox which is about  3/4 mile from my front door and had a very difficult time walking back up the hill. The following week I was at a trade show in San Diego and had to take a taxi two blocks from the Marriott to the convention center. I said whoa, something is really wrong here! Doctor said "you are working too hard".

    Itching- I had very little of this but when I did my entire back itched and I had to scratch it with a dry rough towel. The episodes I had lasted about 1/2 hour.

    The others are right that there is no need to jump to unjustified conclusions. Odds are good that you do not have lymphoma. But get a diagnosis if it worries you. When I was suffering these symptoms I was told by a Doctor, just weeks before diagnosis with stage 4 lymphoma, that it was maybe all in my head. A group of very general symptoms is not a diagnosis. Any given symptom could be from any number of conditions. See a cancer expert. Put your mind at ease.

     

     

    Like Shady

    My night sweats got so bad that my wife had me sleep on a beach blanket, with a body towel on the pillow.  This was with the ceiling fan and a floor fan blowing on me. We did not know that this was indicative of a serious disease.   I did not experience itching at all that I can recall.

    Of course, not all Lymphoma patients have any night sweats.  A person could be about to die of Lymphoma and have never had night sweats at all.  Night sweats are part of a package of symptoms called "B Symptoms," which includes night sweats, fatigue, weight loss, and sometimes itching.  In general, the presence of B Symptoms is viewed by oncologists as indication of more advanced or aggressive disease, but this is not always the case.  Note that part of the term night sweats is the word night.  I marvel when people describe sweating during the day at work and say it is "night sweats."  Ordinarily, night sweats kick in only after going to sleep.

    Night sweats are more traditionally associated with HL than NHL, but some patients with NHL do report B symptoms.

    My fatigue was similiar to Shady's.  At the time I did service calls on ATMs in a company car.   I got to the point that I slept 10 or 12 hours per night, got up and drove to work by around 7;00 AM.  By that time I would have consumed probably 25 ounces of strong coffee.  I might depart on my first call by around 8:30 AM, still drinking coffee.  Within 30 minutes of driving I would have to pull off on the shoulder of the road to snooze, then wake up and drive further until I could buy another 16 oz cup of coffee at a gas station. In other words, within 3 hours of waking up from 12 hours of sleep I was about to pass out from a sensation of exhaustion.  That is how my days went.

    Although I had a very indolent disease, my doctor said that to get as much widespread disease as I had required that I must have had Lymphoma a long, long time, way over a year, possibly several.

    That is what is meant by "fatigue" bad enough to indicate Lymphoma.  But as Sandy also wrote, fatigue that bad could still be any of a hundred different conditions.  Fatigue is one of the most common conditions complained about to doctors, and it can be someting as simple as depression causing it.   

    Just for sharing, I will repeat that when I finally got diagnosed, my blood panels were very nearly perfect, not indicative of any disease.  The only exception was LDH: it was sky high. But, most general practicioners, when they test a patient with a CBC, do not request an LDH.  And despite massive involvement, I have never felt an enlarged lymph node in my life: not before diagnosis or since.   My doctor and NPS all said that somehow mine were just situated deeply within the chest and abdominal cavities.  This left me a bit skeptical about how Lymphoma is diagnosed, since all write-ups regarding my disease state that it usually is caught very early, and is discovered by palpable nodes.  Neither of these were true in my case.

    Lymphoma can only be diagnosed by a doctor, and even doctors require a significant amount of testing and data to make this determination. A layperson convincing themselves that they have it is without merit and in fact counterproductive and unhealthy, both physically and emotionally.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B_symptoms

    max

  • Yag
    Yag Member Posts: 5
    You are Amazing People

    You are a truly wonderful set of people. Thank you for taking time out of your day to patiently address my issues. Your explanations have put me at ease and I will try not to think too much about it (though Max's reply about the lymph nodes not being detected made me a little nervous), but again, i shall heed your advice and not let this go to my head. Thank you again, all of you and I wish you all much peace, happiness, and love!

  • ShadyGuy
    ShadyGuy Member Posts: 756 Member
    edited October 2017 #14
    You are welcome

    I wish you well and hope you never need this site. But if you do you will find kind, knowledgeable people to talk with. Best of luck!

  • dana-mihaela
    dana-mihaela Member Posts: 39
    Hi All,

    I am surprised how many of you had a lot of symptoms. I did not have any symptom of lymphoma no fatigue, no sweating, no lymph nodes enlarged. All my blood work was perfect and LDH slightly elevated a little bit over normal not of any concern. And with no lymphoma symptoms I had a 6 cm tumor (malt lymphoma) in my pelvic area like a helix around the lower part of spinal cord that was pressing on the sciatic nerve. My symptoms were of sciatica from the pressure. How funny is that??

    Dana

  • Thannah
    Thannah Member Posts: 1

    Hi All,

    I am surprised how many of you had a lot of symptoms. I did not have any symptom of lymphoma no fatigue, no sweating, no lymph nodes enlarged. All my blood work was perfect and LDH slightly elevated a little bit over normal not of any concern. And with no lymphoma symptoms I had a 6 cm tumor (malt lymphoma) in my pelvic area like a helix around the lower part of spinal cord that was pressing on the sciatic nerve. My symptoms were of sciatica from the pressure. How funny is that??

    Dana

    Hi Dana!

    what test dicovered your tumor?

     

  • dana-mihaela
    dana-mihaela Member Posts: 39
    Hi Thannah

    I had sciatic pain before in my life , I had a surgery for a herniated disk in my youth and since then I had sciatic problems on and off. I thought this was another episode of sciatic pain and when I saw that after 6 months the pain was getting worse instead of better with some neurological problems on the right leg I got an MRI on my lower back to see if I had herniated disk again. The MRI showed the presence of the soft tumor and after that all the tests followed, biopsy, bone marrow biopsy and diagnostic of MZL ( marginal zone lymphoma) extra nodal B cell.

    Dana

  • ShadyGuy
    ShadyGuy Member Posts: 756 Member
    Similar

    I had suffered from and been treated for low back pain for years. An MRI for that condition led to my eventual FNHL diagnosis. The radiologist who read my lower back MRI recommended a CT to check for CLL or lymphoma. I went to an oncologist who ordered a PET and BMB and diagnosed FNHL Stage IV. Small tumors were everywhere but concentrated in my chest. I almost felt relieved to be informed I had cancer knowing that my myriad symptoms the prior years were not imaginary as some doctors suspected. Lesson learned: go to an oncologist early on instead of messing around with GPs. The low back pain I had suffered for years went away after the first rituxan infusion. I recently developed sciatica in my left leg and the MRI showed a similar situation again. I plan on pursuing it with a PET scan after deer season and the holidays. The cancer is not the boss, I am.

  • kdunagin
    kdunagin Member Posts: 7
    no symptom also

    I had Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, and also, like a few of you on this thread, I had no symptoms whatsoever. The only thing that told me something was not right was a swollen occipital lymph node at the base of the skull (right side). It was rock hard but not painful or anything. My primary care physician went from me having an ear infection to muscle knot and a few other things in between. He prescribed 5 different antibiotics at 5 different times and a series of X-Rays. Not until it kept getting larger and pressed aginst a nerve ending, causing severe pain, that he suggested I went to see an ENT. After a fine needle aspiration biopsy and the result showed that it was Lymphoma, I was, like ShadyGuy, relieved. Finally, after almost 6 months, I knew exactly what I had and a real treatment could start. 

  • hrscrzygal
    hrscrzygal Member Posts: 2
    edited November 2017 #20
    po18guy said:

    Consider...

    Please stop researching a death sentence! Research is good only after you have a diagnosis. And then, only if you stick to the diagnosis and don't go looking for something else. There are 68,069 known human illnesses and conditions. Our bodies are capable of producing about 150 different symptoms. By simple math, that means that each symptom potentially indicates 450+ different illnesses. Two symptoms, double the number and so on. Please allow doctor to do the diagnostics. Do not confuse your web-surfing ability with doctor's medical degree.

    Google is a mortician, not a doctor.

     

    CONFUING

    I agree it can be confusing when you dont know what is for sure and you assume. I am concerned I have swollen lymphnoids and that it is progressing it started in my armpit and chest and yesterday something started up my neck. I am so scared I have sweats. I feel like something is putting pressure on other organs of my body. I am trying not to assume anyting, I would however like to know what others had for side effects going through there experience.

     

  • hrscrzygal
    hrscrzygal Member Posts: 2
    ShadyGuy said:

    Some answers

    based on my own experience only:

    sweats - the lymphoma night sweats are more than just getting hot and sweating. The ones I had were only at night and I was literally drenched. Had to change clothes and pillow case.

    Fatigue - Much more than just being tIred! My fatigue developed slowly enough that I was surprised when I realized just how fatigued I was. I walked to the mailbox which is about  3/4 mile from my front door and had a very difficult time walking back up the hill. The following week I was at a trade show in San Diego and had to take a taxi two blocks from the Marriott to the convention center. I said whoa, something is really wrong here! Doctor said "you are working too hard".

    Itching- I had very little of this but when I did my entire back itched and I had to scratch it with a dry rough towel. The episodes I had lasted about 1/2 hour.

    The others are right that there is no need to jump to unjustified conclusions. Odds are good that you do not have lymphoma. But get a diagnosis if it worries you. When I was suffering these symptoms I was told by a Doctor, just weeks before diagnosis with stage 4 lymphoma, that it was maybe all in my head. A group of very general symptoms is not a diagnosis. Any given symptom could be from any number of conditions. See a cancer expert. Put your mind at ease.

     

     

    symptoms

    hi, by chance can you share other side effects? please.