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Vitamin C?

JanJan63
JanJan63 Member Posts: 2,478

I just read this and I'm wondering if any of you colon cancer gurus have any thoughts on this.

https://nutrigift.com/vitamin-c-therapy/

It says you're supposed to get the vitamin C through intravenous to get enough so that's a drawback. I'm certainly willing to take more vitamin C in tablet form, though.

Thanks for any help or thoughts.

Jan

Comments

  • Trubrit
    Trubrit Member Posts: 5,535 **
    Not for me

    I juice and orange and lemon or lime, together each day, and that is good enough for me. 

    Each to his own, thuogh.  

    There are just SO MANY things out there that we are 'supposed to be doing' that you could go mad and eat grass (that's an English saying).  Do what feels good to you. For me, its a no go. 

    TRU       P.S.  I am so sick of hearing 'A new study shows....'   Eggs are bad. Eggs are good. Bacon is bad. Bacon is good. Breathing is bad......     

  • sursrx
    sursrx Member Posts: 6
    edited May 2017 #3
    hi

    Hi,

    One of my friend's father recovered completly from stage 4 cancer in 2010 using just vitamin C , Rath supplements and B17,15 formula alog with lot of juicing and lil homeopathy pills. You can get these from amazon and b17 package from apricotpower or mynatureschoice.com

     

    The protocol that includes the synergistic micronutrients used in Dr. Rath’s cancer research are as follows:

    • Healthy Cell Growth formula (6-9 capsules/day) for 1 week, then add
    • Cardiovascular Health Formula (3-6 tablets/day) for 1 week, then add
    • Phytobiologicals (2-4 capsules ) for 1 week, then add
    • Healthy Collagen (3-6 tablets/day)

    B17,15 500mg each x2 tablets each x 3 times for first 21 days..make sure you take the mega enzyme after 2 hours of these tablets...and then come to maintenance dose of 500mg each x3 times for all your life...its proven to help is what I hear.

    All the best wishes again!

  • mozart13
    mozart13 Member Posts: 118
    Another theory

    one of those, I knew some one who was heavy on vit c, unfortunatlly didnt do much for him.

    My farmacist told me before I started chemo, dont you go now and get vit c infusion.

    Common sense in every thing, like you said Jan something simillar in another post, from yesterday, so I came to common sense as well, talking about fasting, its not for me,  when I had chemo/rad in jan, I didnt touch vitamins or antioxidants, tumor is no longer there, so gonna do the same now while on folfox.

     

  • JanJan63
    JanJan63 Member Posts: 2,478
    You guys are all right, I'm

    You guys are all right, I'm just looking for an easy an cheap thing to do to be honest. And there's no way to really tell if something works or not. A persona can take anything along with standard treatment and beat their cancer and  think it was because of the extra things they did but it might have nothing to do with it.

    I'll be honest, I do very little to asist in my cancer fight. I do eat more fruit and veggies than I used to but not as much as I should. And it's only because my tastes have changed and I like them more now, not to help myself. I don't beleive in things like fasting and don't see how it could possibly help in any way. So many ideas just make no sense to me.

    Jan

  • tanstaafl
    tanstaafl Member Posts: 1,299
    edited May 2017 #6
    works for us

    IV vitamin C has several potential benefits for patients. Probably a majority CRC patients would have substantial benefit(s) at different points of their illness, used knowledgeably and skillfully.  If your doctors or pharmacist aren't involved in IV vitamin C treatments, odds are that they are pretty ignorant on the subject.

    IV vitamin C by itself isn't adequate for most advanced CRC patients for a good kill of the cancer cells.  But it works well for us as part of a chemo + alternative adjunct cocktail.  After the first year, regular 5FU-LV based chemo(s) just doesn't work by itself either.  My wife hasn't needed steroids, opoids or experienced most "normal" chemo problems in various situations in part due to the IV vitamin C.  In fact, a patient living next door to MD Anderson or a CTCA might still have reason to envy her, in terms of QoL and longevity.

    ...there's no way to really tell if something works or not.  

    At low residual disease with good sugar and inflammation control, with multiple active markers, it seemed pretty easy to tell from the blood data when things weren't working.  However, the  standard blood monitoring for CRC looks woefully inadequate to us.  In part, we have advantages because we don't have to deal with overwhelming marker "noise" from damage to normal cells and organs by (standard) heavy  chemo cycles.

     

  • SandiaBuddy
    SandiaBuddy Member Posts: 1,204 **
    Alternatives

    Jan:

    I am with you.  It makes sense to be open to alternatives.  We all want to maximize our chances.  I have been looking at some of the same things and what seems to have scientific support from my research are: exercise, good diet, Vitamin D, and coffee.  Aspirin seems unresolved at this point in time. Hopefully others will chime in with what they have discovered.

  • JanJan63
    JanJan63 Member Posts: 2,478

    Alternatives

    Jan:

    I am with you.  It makes sense to be open to alternatives.  We all want to maximize our chances.  I have been looking at some of the same things and what seems to have scientific support from my research are: exercise, good diet, Vitamin D, and coffee.  Aspirin seems unresolved at this point in time. Hopefully others will chime in with what they have discovered.

    Coffee? Just drinking coffee?

    Coffee? Just drinking coffee? I don't drink it, I never have. It used to give me terrible diarrhea, worse than just the IBS did so I never started drinking it. I hope you don't mean those coffee enemas!

    Jan

  • SandiaBuddy
    SandiaBuddy Member Posts: 1,204 **
    edited May 2017 #9
    Coffee

    Yes, drinking coffee.  I had quit after my diagnosis because I figured it was bad for me, but I have added 5 measured cups back into my health routine.  Here is the study: http://ascopubs.org/doi/pdf/10.1200/JCO.2015.61.5062

     

  • JanJan63
    JanJan63 Member Posts: 2,478

    Coffee

    Yes, drinking coffee.  I had quit after my diagnosis because I figured it was bad for me, but I have added 5 measured cups back into my health routine.  Here is the study: http://ascopubs.org/doi/pdf/10.1200/JCO.2015.61.5062

     

    That's intereating. Nothing

    That's intereating. Nothing conlcusive but a possibilty. It states it may help with stopping a recurrence which is what I have. I wonder what it could do to deal with one once you have it. It would be hard to start drinking coffee, it's just not something I ever got into but some people are nuts about it. Hmm.

    Thank you!

    Jan

  • SandiaBuddy
    SandiaBuddy Member Posts: 1,204 **
    edited May 2017 #11
    Preventing recurrence

    The sole issue I have been looking at is increasing my chances of avoiding recurrence (Stage 3 tumor removed with colectomy, 3/27 lymph nodes positive).  However, the research would probably also be useful in other circumstances.  Many people find coffee one of the pleasures of life.  You might try half a cup mixed with a strong dose of half and half, if coffee is something you choose to explore.

  • JanJan63
    JanJan63 Member Posts: 2,478

    Preventing recurrence

    The sole issue I have been looking at is increasing my chances of avoiding recurrence (Stage 3 tumor removed with colectomy, 3/27 lymph nodes positive).  However, the research would probably also be useful in other circumstances.  Many people find coffee one of the pleasures of life.  You might try half a cup mixed with a strong dose of half and half, if coffee is something you choose to explore.

    Thanks for the suggestion!

    Thanks for the suggestion!

    Jan

  • beaumontdave
    beaumontdave Member Posts: 1,176 **
    Why can't they find beer

    Why can't they find beer prevents colon cancer? I've established that it doesn't prevent reoccurances in the liver, my noble contribution to research. I'm happy to here about coffee's effect, since putting a Keurig in the bedroom, I've been a two cup in the morning regular, as it gets me going in a very efficient manner. The baby aspirin and exercise comprise the rest of my anti-cancer regime. Well that and more veggies and fruit, but I draw the line at completely giving up things. I've cut down on red and processed meats, but I'm going to enjoy a good steak now and then, and a few beers every so often. I've battled a long time to enjoy my life, and within moderation and necessary adjustments, that's what I'm doing. I do understand those who pursue every possible avenue, but I detest the idea that cancer gets to take any more from me than it already has. Good luck to all of us in this fight............................Dave

  • JanJan63
    JanJan63 Member Posts: 2,478

    Why can't they find beer

    Why can't they find beer prevents colon cancer? I've established that it doesn't prevent reoccurances in the liver, my noble contribution to research. I'm happy to here about coffee's effect, since putting a Keurig in the bedroom, I've been a two cup in the morning regular, as it gets me going in a very efficient manner. The baby aspirin and exercise comprise the rest of my anti-cancer regime. Well that and more veggies and fruit, but I draw the line at completely giving up things. I've cut down on red and processed meats, but I'm going to enjoy a good steak now and then, and a few beers every so often. I've battled a long time to enjoy my life, and within moderation and necessary adjustments, that's what I'm doing. I do understand those who pursue every possible avenue, but I detest the idea that cancer gets to take any more from me than it already has. Good luck to all of us in this fight............................Dave

    Thanks for the giggle first

    Thanks for the giggle first thing in the morning Dave! I agree about living life as normally as possible but trying to eat a little better. Plenty of very healthy people who treat their bodies like a temple get colon cancer. Vegetarians and even vegans get it. As I've mentioned on this site before, our friend's horse had to be put down due to a huge colon tumour and I can guarantee he never ate meat. he also lived with the same horses in the same field and ate the same hay for years and he's the only one to get it.

    And yes, cancer takes enough of our lives without doing things we don;t want to do or cutting out things we enjoy when its likely they will make no difference at all. I know a few people have gottne mad at me in the past for me stance against doing things other than covventional treatment but I really believe we should just continue to live and enjoy life. It's short enough as it is and cancer might not be the one that gets us, it could very well be something else.

    Well said, Dave!

    Jan

  • SandiaBuddy
    SandiaBuddy Member Posts: 1,204 **
    Beer

    Dave:

    I am a fan of beer as well, but I have been cutting back.  There is one study that shows beer a neutral in leading to colon cancer and red wine a positive (in avoiding colon cancer).  You might enjoy reading it: (abstract only, I have a copy of the whole article I will post at some future date with the results of my research on optimizing your chances): https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27861761

    Jan, I got a chuckle from your horse example.  Hey, humor is one of the things that is supposed to increase your chances!

     

     

     

  • JanJan63
    JanJan63 Member Posts: 2,478

    Beer

    Dave:

    I am a fan of beer as well, but I have been cutting back.  There is one study that shows beer a neutral in leading to colon cancer and red wine a positive (in avoiding colon cancer).  You might enjoy reading it: (abstract only, I have a copy of the whole article I will post at some future date with the results of my research on optimizing your chances): https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27861761

    Jan, I got a chuckle from your horse example.  Hey, humor is one of the things that is supposed to increase your chances!

     

     

     

    Thanks for not mentioning my

    Thanks for not mentioning my typos in my last post. I just glanced over it and was horrified by it. I'm the spelling Nazi as well as the grammar Nazi in our home. But sometimes I type too fast and it doesn't go well at all. Yes, the horse was an interesting one. I also have a friend who has been a vegetarian most of her adult life and also tries to be vegan and she was diagnosed with breast cancer several years ago. I know that breast cancer isn't as closely related to what we eat as colon cancer is supposed to be but it's still odd, I think.

    Jan