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Brocolli Sprouts.

Helen321
Helen321 Member Posts: 1,425
Are they really all they're cracked up to be? So as I mentioned I haven't slept in 3 days and so as not to wake up my family, I've been taking random midnight/1 AM walks. Well to my surprise day one, one of my neighbors was out speedwalking at 12:30 in the morning. Who does that? My neighbor apparently. Oh yeah and me. So she asks if I'm okay and she already knew about the cancer so I told her it's back and she takes me inside her house and hands me a box of grass. Apparently I am to chew this grass just like a cow. I'm thinking okay crazy lady. She also gave me wild salmon and some almond soy as I'm a dairy drinker (at least I was until a few days ago). Took sugar out of my diet, white bread and a few other things. So I look it up and sure enough the nut (I love her dearly) is correct. Brocolli sprouts are all the cancer fighting rage. Who knew. So does anyone eat them and is there really any value to them or is someone selling us a bridge with a giant field of brocolli sprouts right beneath it and we're buying into it? I'm on day three of the sprouts and other foods she recommended that also checked out and short of no one wanting to go near the bathroom when I'm done, they're not so bad. I'm going to go to a nutritionist shortly to get better guidance but I figure the sprouts are a good place to start.

Comments

  • tanstaafl
    tanstaafl Member Posts: 1,299
    brocolli sprouts are progress
    Diet and supplement progress is cumulative. Brocolli contains Indole 3-Carbinol and sulforaphane, inhibitors, as well as other nutrients. We have found we need every edge, surgery, nutrition and chemo, we can get to stop my wife's mets in their tracks, better than any doctor's prognosis.
  • pete43lost_at_sea
    pete43lost_at_sea Member Posts: 3,900
    been on them for 6 months
    The product I use is enduracell, the theories are impressive re cancer recovery and dna repair. They are one of my key products.
    Your diet sounds like a good start. Good luck with sulphorane and the diet.

    Checkout my blog if your interested in broccoli sprouts and the antioxidant conflicts.

    Hugs,
    Pete
  • gfpiv
    gfpiv Member Posts: 59

    been on them for 6 months
    The product I use is enduracell, the theories are impressive re cancer recovery and dna repair. They are one of my key products.
    Your diet sounds like a good start. Good luck with sulphorane and the diet.

    Checkout my blog if your interested in broccoli sprouts and the antioxidant conflicts.

    Hugs,
    Pete

    Cancer Diet
    There are a million different viewpoints on supplemental treatment for cancer patients. Since I've done a plenty of research on it (though I can't hold a candle to Pete), here are a few quick-hit thoughts:

    GOOD:
    1. Natural, minimally processed foods, esp. fiber and veggies - yes, broccoli/sulphoraphane is supposedly one of the best veggies for cancer patients.
    2. Have your Vitamin D level checked - you will almost certainly want Vit D supplements, say 1-2,000 IU/day.
    3. Exercise as much as you can - can help fight both cancer and chemo side effects. (Hey, those 1AM walks count too!)

    BAD:
    1. Sugar. Keeping your blood sugar levels relatively stable (incl. minimizing white rice, bread and baked potatoes...and adding fiber and lean protein), will keep down spikes of insulin (which I believe can feed cancer). (Caveat: some don't agree with this theory, but I feel there's plent of evidence.)
    2. Milk (or cheese) that contains rBGH (bovine growth hormone). Luckily, most milk no longer contains hormones, but most cheese does.
    3. Stressing yourself out too much over every little thing about your treatment. Yes, relaxing is easier said than done, especially for a new patient like yourself. But in time you'll see that it gets easier. In the meantime, reach out to others for support and info, that should help lots.

    Best of luck,
    Chip
  • smokeyjoe
    smokeyjoe Member Posts: 1,425
    gfpiv said:

    Cancer Diet
    There are a million different viewpoints on supplemental treatment for cancer patients. Since I've done a plenty of research on it (though I can't hold a candle to Pete), here are a few quick-hit thoughts:

    GOOD:
    1. Natural, minimally processed foods, esp. fiber and veggies - yes, broccoli/sulphoraphane is supposedly one of the best veggies for cancer patients.
    2. Have your Vitamin D level checked - you will almost certainly want Vit D supplements, say 1-2,000 IU/day.
    3. Exercise as much as you can - can help fight both cancer and chemo side effects. (Hey, those 1AM walks count too!)

    BAD:
    1. Sugar. Keeping your blood sugar levels relatively stable (incl. minimizing white rice, bread and baked potatoes...and adding fiber and lean protein), will keep down spikes of insulin (which I believe can feed cancer). (Caveat: some don't agree with this theory, but I feel there's plent of evidence.)
    2. Milk (or cheese) that contains rBGH (bovine growth hormone). Luckily, most milk no longer contains hormones, but most cheese does.
    3. Stressing yourself out too much over every little thing about your treatment. Yes, relaxing is easier said than done, especially for a new patient like yourself. But in time you'll see that it gets easier. In the meantime, reach out to others for support and info, that should help lots.

    Best of luck,
    Chip

    Yes!!! I don't chew them
    Yes!!! I don't chew them like a cow (lol, okay maybe)....put them in salads with spinach and such.
  • peterz54
    peterz54 Member Posts: 341
    yes
    you can validate the suggestions made here by using google scholar and the NIH pubmed site.

    but mainstream medicine is already backing some plant extracts and we are seeing more research and trials.

    curcumin, milk thistle, and mushrooms (extract or cooked) are a few more..also endorsed by my wife's oncologist

    if you haven't shifted to a predominantly plant based diet suggest doing your homework using suggestions from here and elsewhere so you can make an informed decision..

    good luck
  • peterz54
    peterz54 Member Posts: 341
    NYU Cancer Institute on Diet & Exercise
    NYU video
  • Helen321
    Helen321 Member Posts: 1,425

    been on them for 6 months
    The product I use is enduracell, the theories are impressive re cancer recovery and dna repair. They are one of my key products.
    Your diet sounds like a good start. Good luck with sulphorane and the diet.

    Checkout my blog if your interested in broccoli sprouts and the antioxidant conflicts.

    Hugs,
    Pete

    Great, will do! Because I
    Great, will do! Because I read a little bit about that but I need more details.
  • Helen321
    Helen321 Member Posts: 1,425
    gfpiv said:

    Cancer Diet
    There are a million different viewpoints on supplemental treatment for cancer patients. Since I've done a plenty of research on it (though I can't hold a candle to Pete), here are a few quick-hit thoughts:

    GOOD:
    1. Natural, minimally processed foods, esp. fiber and veggies - yes, broccoli/sulphoraphane is supposedly one of the best veggies for cancer patients.
    2. Have your Vitamin D level checked - you will almost certainly want Vit D supplements, say 1-2,000 IU/day.
    3. Exercise as much as you can - can help fight both cancer and chemo side effects. (Hey, those 1AM walks count too!)

    BAD:
    1. Sugar. Keeping your blood sugar levels relatively stable (incl. minimizing white rice, bread and baked potatoes...and adding fiber and lean protein), will keep down spikes of insulin (which I believe can feed cancer). (Caveat: some don't agree with this theory, but I feel there's plent of evidence.)
    2. Milk (or cheese) that contains rBGH (bovine growth hormone). Luckily, most milk no longer contains hormones, but most cheese does.
    3. Stressing yourself out too much over every little thing about your treatment. Yes, relaxing is easier said than done, especially for a new patient like yourself. But in time you'll see that it gets easier. In the meantime, reach out to others for support and info, that should help lots.

    Best of luck,
    Chip

    Hi Chip, thanks for the
    Hi Chip, thanks for the info, stress levels today at a 2. That's down from the 35.5 the other day. That day was horrible. I actually literally wanted to kill myself from the anxiety levels. I have never experienced that in my entire life. I'm having trouble finding foods I can eat. I never realized how bad my family eats until now. I'm at my sisters nd there is literally nothing I can eat. It's all junk. Even her granola bars and called salt and sugar granola bars. I'm a sugar addict so I'm with you on the sugar belief. True of not, I'm not going to find out. Cold turkey day 4 and feeling just fine. I don't even miss it.
  • Helen321
    Helen321 Member Posts: 1,425
    gfpiv said:

    Cancer Diet
    There are a million different viewpoints on supplemental treatment for cancer patients. Since I've done a plenty of research on it (though I can't hold a candle to Pete), here are a few quick-hit thoughts:

    GOOD:
    1. Natural, minimally processed foods, esp. fiber and veggies - yes, broccoli/sulphoraphane is supposedly one of the best veggies for cancer patients.
    2. Have your Vitamin D level checked - you will almost certainly want Vit D supplements, say 1-2,000 IU/day.
    3. Exercise as much as you can - can help fight both cancer and chemo side effects. (Hey, those 1AM walks count too!)

    BAD:
    1. Sugar. Keeping your blood sugar levels relatively stable (incl. minimizing white rice, bread and baked potatoes...and adding fiber and lean protein), will keep down spikes of insulin (which I believe can feed cancer). (Caveat: some don't agree with this theory, but I feel there's plent of evidence.)
    2. Milk (or cheese) that contains rBGH (bovine growth hormone). Luckily, most milk no longer contains hormones, but most cheese does.
    3. Stressing yourself out too much over every little thing about your treatment. Yes, relaxing is easier said than done, especially for a new patient like yourself. But in time you'll see that it gets easier. In the meantime, reach out to others for support and info, that should help lots.

    Best of luck,
    Chip

    Hi Chip, thanks for the
    Hi Chip, thanks for the info, stress levels today at a 2. That's down from the 35.5 the other day. That day was horrible. I actually literally wanted to kill myself from the anxiety levels. I have never experienced that in my entire life. I'm having trouble finding foods I can eat. I never realized how bad my family eats until now. I'm at my sisters nd there is literally nothing I can eat. It's all junk. Even her granola bars and called salt and sugar granola bars. I'm a sugar addict so I'm with you on the sugar belief. True of not, I'm not going to find out. Cold turkey day 4 and feeling just fine. I don't even miss it.
  • Helen321
    Helen321 Member Posts: 1,425
    tanstaafl said:

    brocolli sprouts are progress
    Diet and supplement progress is cumulative. Brocolli contains Indole 3-Carbinol and sulforaphane, inhibitors, as well as other nutrients. We have found we need every edge, surgery, nutrition and chemo, we can get to stop my wife's mets in their tracks, better than any doctor's prognosis.

    Every edge sounds like a
    Every edge sounds like a good plan!
  • Helen321
    Helen321 Member Posts: 1,425
    peterz54 said:

    NYU Cancer Institute on Diet & Exercise
    NYU video

    Fantastic, thank you! I've
    Fantastic, thank you! I've stopped all red meat, white bread, white potatoes and pasta. Added whole wheat bread and pasta. Oatmeal for breakfast (not the packaged kind). I read that some chicken is okay. I'm not a big plant eater but I'm learning to be one. I have to learn to make up my protein in other ways. Switching too quickly is hard on the digestive system so I'm slowly going to two servings of veggies as my "main meal" with a small side of chicken. I can't figure out what to eat for sides aside from the wheat pasta and someone recommended sweet potatoes. I also read about garlic so I'm going to start adding chopped up garlic to my meals. We usually use powdered. The brocolli sprouts are really not so bad when you throw them on foods.
  • tanstaafl
    tanstaafl Member Posts: 1,299
    Helen321 said:

    Fantastic, thank you! I've
    Fantastic, thank you! I've stopped all red meat, white bread, white potatoes and pasta. Added whole wheat bread and pasta. Oatmeal for breakfast (not the packaged kind). I read that some chicken is okay. I'm not a big plant eater but I'm learning to be one. I have to learn to make up my protein in other ways. Switching too quickly is hard on the digestive system so I'm slowly going to two servings of veggies as my "main meal" with a small side of chicken. I can't figure out what to eat for sides aside from the wheat pasta and someone recommended sweet potatoes. I also read about garlic so I'm going to start adding chopped up garlic to my meals. We usually use powdered. The brocolli sprouts are really not so bad when you throw them on foods.

    points
    My wife does well with chicken and liver dishes, her veggies are a necessary effort. Pacific wild salmons are a thought, fresh best, but even $2-3 a 15oz can at high volume discount grocers. Also sardines.

    US wheat products are high starch, and also folate enriched, something that incrementally adds toxicity on 5FU based chemos without benefit. We radically removed synethetic folate (common vitamins with folate, enriched foods like bread) from her diet and supplements after folate-5FU became an issue. Got natural folates from liver, colored vegetable and juicing, with some improved blood parameters on chemo. Sugar and starches can spike Insulin Growth Factor, a tumor promoter.
  • Helen321
    Helen321 Member Posts: 1,425
    tanstaafl said:

    points
    My wife does well with chicken and liver dishes, her veggies are a necessary effort. Pacific wild salmons are a thought, fresh best, but even $2-3 a 15oz can at high volume discount grocers. Also sardines.

    US wheat products are high starch, and also folate enriched, something that incrementally adds toxicity on 5FU based chemos without benefit. We radically removed synethetic folate (common vitamins with folate, enriched foods like bread) from her diet and supplements after folate-5FU became an issue. Got natural folates from liver, colored vegetable and juicing, with some improved blood parameters on chemo. Sugar and starches can spike Insulin Growth Factor, a tumor promoter.

    I am joining your wife in
    I am joining your wife in that necessary effort! I'm not a fish eater except tuna although my neighbor gave me canned wild salmon and said it tastes like tuna. Tuna is doable. Thanks for the wheat info. Starch is out too, ugh. That's all I can say about that. I think I'll just find five basic foods that I can eat for awhile and stick to those. Thank God for oatmeal and chicken. If you say no oatmeal, I swear I'm becoming a no eatatarian!
  • gfpiv
    gfpiv Member Posts: 59
    Helen321 said:

    I am joining your wife in
    I am joining your wife in that necessary effort! I'm not a fish eater except tuna although my neighbor gave me canned wild salmon and said it tastes like tuna. Tuna is doable. Thanks for the wheat info. Starch is out too, ugh. That's all I can say about that. I think I'll just find five basic foods that I can eat for awhile and stick to those. Thank God for oatmeal and chicken. If you say no oatmeal, I swear I'm becoming a no eatatarian!

    diet
    Helen, it's great that you're making a effort to eat healthier, it certainly is not an easy thing to make wholesale changes like that. Personally I do eat plenty of wheat pasta; I've heard about the folate concerns and to some extent agree, but we have to eat something to fill us up. And the gluten in pasta means it takes longer to digest/metabolize than say rice or bread. Along those lines, not sure if you have a taste for them, but even better are barley, long-grain/wild rice, and especially quinoa....healthy, low-glycemic grains that can be used as staples/bulk (along with your oatmeal).

    Also, one caveat about fresh garlic - it is very healthy for you, and even supposedly has some anti-cancer properties, not to mention tastes great, HOWEVER you should be aware that it can reduce your platelet counts. So I would recommend going light on the garlic for a couple days before you're due to get chemo, so it doesn't impact your labs. In 2.5 years, I only had chemo postponed once for low platelets...and I'm pretty sure it was because I went on a garlic binge that week.

    -Chip
  • ron50
    ron50 Member Posts: 1,723
    Life is funny
    The old sayin that one mans meat is another mans poison is so true.When I had chemo it was every tuesday by infusion...big bags of 5Fu and every second week I got to take 9 little pills of levamisole an anti -parasitic cattle drench.
    Some of my chemo compannions were on the same regime and often they would miss a week because of blood counts. My counts never wavered always right in the normal range. My onc once asked what I ate and I replied anything that I like. sometimes that was controled by how I felt so I ate a lot of rolled oats and honey and that was kind to my gut. Since ca I pretty well eat everything,meat,fish,chicken,fruit veges and grains. The only constraint I put on myself is that I try to stick to low GI.
    Exercise was another option I tried ,at one stage I was walking over 50 miles a week. I did that for 18 mos non stop.Then I developed acute pancreatitis and lost my gallbladder.
    My surgeon did an endoscopy at the same time and my stomach was wall to wall ulcers ,he thought it was cancer. But it was only ulcers and he gave me a severe talking too about try to kill myself with excercise.
    Well now I can hardly walk and my joints are all full of arthritis. I suspect that the only thing that I should have stopped eating is the drugs they gave me. I only found out on friday that the 18 mos I spent on high dose prednisone has effected my pancreas and I am oficially type two diabetic. Fortunately my adherence to low gi foods means I am well controlled by diet and a couple of diabex tablets a day.I don't know what will eventually get me but it won't be worry. Stay well everyone,Ron(the accidental tourist of ca)