Abiraterone - on the Trial....After Surgery 0.0% Residual Cancer - Nothing, Nada

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Comments

  • SeattleJ
    SeattleJ Member Posts: 32
    I was in the same trial
    I was in the same trial and had similar results. A little history:

    I was 59 when diagnosed (and still am until May 23rd!)I had my annual check in July 2010. The DRE revealed a lump and my PSA was 19. The biopsy revealed Gleason grade 7 (4+3 and cancer in 7 of the 12 cores). An MRI also showed a suspicious lymph node in, as the doctor said, a strange place well away from the normal prostate drain field.

    My treatment has entirely taken place at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (Univ. of Washington Medical Center & Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center)under the care of Dr William Ellis (surgeon) and Dr James P. Dean (medical oncologist). I took part in a clinical trial of pre-adjuvant Abiraterone & Lupron plus Prednisone. This lasted 6 months. I then had an open radical prostatectomy on March 1, 2011. Surgery was required by the study, but it could be either robotic or open. I had open because of the suspicious lymph node. The surgeon wanted to do a very thorough surgical lymph node resection. The pathology report showed clear margins, no seminal vesicle invasion, no extracapsular invasion and no lymph node involvement. The suspicious lymph node showed that the clinical trial had an effect--there was evidence of inflammation which is present when a cancer has been destroyed. No active cancer was found. Because of the use of Abiraterone and Lupron, the pathologist cannot determine a post surgery Gleason score. The treatment effect makes that impossible. I have since had one PSA test with an undetectable result (>.03 at this lab. My next test is June 8th. I still wear a pad for security reasons but in most 24 hour periods the pad stays dry.

    The side effects of both Abiraterone and Lupron are similar and were manageable for me. I had (and still have) hot flashes. Weight control was very difficult, although I only gained about 7 pounds. Libido drops to nothing as does potency. Fatigue was the primary problem, but it was manageable and I was able to work full time and continue with life as normal during the study. I had blood tests every two weeks.

    Now that the treatment phase of this is over, I'm working with our daughter who is a registered dietician to make sure that I eat a very healthy diet. The weight is starting to come off and that should get easier as the testosterone continues to come back into my system. A good support system is vital. My wife is a breast cancer survivor so we knew the drill when this happened, but it is still a rough road.

    I knew that I had an aggressive cancer so I wanted the most aggressive treatment. I didn't hesitate to take part in the trial as I wanted to bring every weapon possible in this fight. Hopefully it will all turn out well, but at least I know I've done all I can. I would advise everyone to get to the best treatment center they can possibly find. It does make a difference.

    I can try to answer questions if anyone has them.

    John
  • lewvino
    lewvino Member Posts: 1,010
    SeattleJ said:

    I was in the same trial
    I was in the same trial and had similar results. A little history:

    I was 59 when diagnosed (and still am until May 23rd!)I had my annual check in July 2010. The DRE revealed a lump and my PSA was 19. The biopsy revealed Gleason grade 7 (4+3 and cancer in 7 of the 12 cores). An MRI also showed a suspicious lymph node in, as the doctor said, a strange place well away from the normal prostate drain field.

    My treatment has entirely taken place at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (Univ. of Washington Medical Center & Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center)under the care of Dr William Ellis (surgeon) and Dr James P. Dean (medical oncologist). I took part in a clinical trial of pre-adjuvant Abiraterone & Lupron plus Prednisone. This lasted 6 months. I then had an open radical prostatectomy on March 1, 2011. Surgery was required by the study, but it could be either robotic or open. I had open because of the suspicious lymph node. The surgeon wanted to do a very thorough surgical lymph node resection. The pathology report showed clear margins, no seminal vesicle invasion, no extracapsular invasion and no lymph node involvement. The suspicious lymph node showed that the clinical trial had an effect--there was evidence of inflammation which is present when a cancer has been destroyed. No active cancer was found. Because of the use of Abiraterone and Lupron, the pathologist cannot determine a post surgery Gleason score. The treatment effect makes that impossible. I have since had one PSA test with an undetectable result (>.03 at this lab. My next test is June 8th. I still wear a pad for security reasons but in most 24 hour periods the pad stays dry.

    The side effects of both Abiraterone and Lupron are similar and were manageable for me. I had (and still have) hot flashes. Weight control was very difficult, although I only gained about 7 pounds. Libido drops to nothing as does potency. Fatigue was the primary problem, but it was manageable and I was able to work full time and continue with life as normal during the study. I had blood tests every two weeks.

    Now that the treatment phase of this is over, I'm working with our daughter who is a registered dietician to make sure that I eat a very healthy diet. The weight is starting to come off and that should get easier as the testosterone continues to come back into my system. A good support system is vital. My wife is a breast cancer survivor so we knew the drill when this happened, but it is still a rough road.

    I knew that I had an aggressive cancer so I wanted the most aggressive treatment. I didn't hesitate to take part in the trial as I wanted to bring every weapon possible in this fight. Hopefully it will all turn out well, but at least I know I've done all I can. I would advise everyone to get to the best treatment center they can possibly find. It does make a difference.

    I can try to answer questions if anyone has them.

    John

    I love to read good stories!
    I love to read good stories! Wish you more great results with your fight and also on the weight loss! Congrats all around!

    Lewvino (larry)
  • VascodaGama
    VascodaGama Member Posts: 3,495 Member
    lewvino said:

    I love to read good stories!
    I love to read good stories! Wish you more great results with your fight and also on the weight loss! Congrats all around!

    Lewvino (larry)

    John; Thanks for participating in the trial
    John

    Congratulations on the results from your treatment. Your and Bob participation in this trial is helping the many of us and “newbies” in confronting this disease.
    I have been following trials on Abiraterone in Europe since 2007. Your trial had the intent in checking the drugs’ effectiveness on body tissue (the prostate). This is the reason why surgery made part in the process to remove the gland for examination. The benefit for the participants was therefore double. Usually, cases where metastases are present, surgery is not done because it would not assure cure. Abiraterone in this setting makes the difference and I believe that we will see a new treatment procedure where a simple “pill” will substitute the “bistoury” in the future.
    More results are coming in regards to Abiraterone and breast cancer.

    Wishing you a continuous success.

    Thanks,
    VGama
  • mrspjd
    mrspjd Member Posts: 694 Member
    SeattleJ said:

    I was in the same trial
    I was in the same trial and had similar results. A little history:

    I was 59 when diagnosed (and still am until May 23rd!)I had my annual check in July 2010. The DRE revealed a lump and my PSA was 19. The biopsy revealed Gleason grade 7 (4+3 and cancer in 7 of the 12 cores). An MRI also showed a suspicious lymph node in, as the doctor said, a strange place well away from the normal prostate drain field.

    My treatment has entirely taken place at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (Univ. of Washington Medical Center & Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center)under the care of Dr William Ellis (surgeon) and Dr James P. Dean (medical oncologist). I took part in a clinical trial of pre-adjuvant Abiraterone & Lupron plus Prednisone. This lasted 6 months. I then had an open radical prostatectomy on March 1, 2011. Surgery was required by the study, but it could be either robotic or open. I had open because of the suspicious lymph node. The surgeon wanted to do a very thorough surgical lymph node resection. The pathology report showed clear margins, no seminal vesicle invasion, no extracapsular invasion and no lymph node involvement. The suspicious lymph node showed that the clinical trial had an effect--there was evidence of inflammation which is present when a cancer has been destroyed. No active cancer was found. Because of the use of Abiraterone and Lupron, the pathologist cannot determine a post surgery Gleason score. The treatment effect makes that impossible. I have since had one PSA test with an undetectable result (>.03 at this lab. My next test is June 8th. I still wear a pad for security reasons but in most 24 hour periods the pad stays dry.

    The side effects of both Abiraterone and Lupron are similar and were manageable for me. I had (and still have) hot flashes. Weight control was very difficult, although I only gained about 7 pounds. Libido drops to nothing as does potency. Fatigue was the primary problem, but it was manageable and I was able to work full time and continue with life as normal during the study. I had blood tests every two weeks.

    Now that the treatment phase of this is over, I'm working with our daughter who is a registered dietician to make sure that I eat a very healthy diet. The weight is starting to come off and that should get easier as the testosterone continues to come back into my system. A good support system is vital. My wife is a breast cancer survivor so we knew the drill when this happened, but it is still a rough road.

    I knew that I had an aggressive cancer so I wanted the most aggressive treatment. I didn't hesitate to take part in the trial as I wanted to bring every weapon possible in this fight. Hopefully it will all turn out well, but at least I know I've done all I can. I would advise everyone to get to the best treatment center they can possibly find. It does make a difference.

    I can try to answer questions if anyone has them.

    John

    Thanks for the info
    John,

    Welcome to the PCa forum. Thanks for being so forthcoming and sharing the details of your PCa journey, dx stats and history as that info really adds perspective in understanding your tx and participation in the Abi clinical study. Also appreciate your offer to answer questions. Hope you decide to continue to post updates on your progress.

    Your inspirational story, experience, and the info you (and Bob) provided will certainly be helpful to many others, especially those dx'd with intermediate to high risk PCa.

    Wishing you continued success.

    mrs pjd