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Who here is using food to better their prognosis, either in conjunction with other therapies or even without other therapies?

california_artist's picture
california_artist
Posts: 860
Joined: Jan 2009

Does it seem to be working, in your opinion?

What types of things are you doing?

Books you've relied on or different types of doctors you have used to guide you.

Another question goes like this. If you have been doing "x", "y", and "z",then you get cancer, have treatment and continue doing whatever "x" etc,were, do you think you will have a different outcome, or do you think you might have trouble beating your cancer.

Do you think, if you take the time and really think about it, that it might make sense to try to change what you had been doing when you got cancer, now that you are trying to not get cancer again.

If you have heart disease or diabetes, or you are overweight or have liver problems due to drinking, or a myriad of other things, wouldn't you expect you doctor to ask you to change your behavior? Wouldn't you expect them to ,at the very least, give you some helpful guidelines when you have something as potentially life changing as cancer. Why would most doctors say there is nothing you could do through diet or lifestyle changes that would make any difference, when there are so many studies that no longer support that view?

Why doesn't he/she then ask you to change your behavior in regards to your cancer, especially in lieu of the fact that cancer cells have specific needs and specific things that slows down division or induces cancer death? Put this way, if you have type two diabetes, or are close to getting cirrhosis of the liver, and you go to your doctor and they give you whatever they give you for diabetes, or cirrhosis and don't ask you to change any of your behaviors, what would you think of that treatment?

Best to us all, and I still don't think so many should be having cancer wipe them out.

I have a monumental amount of hope for cancer's toll to be lessened, with changes we can make in our lives, and even better, in our children's lives. That is truly what I am all about.

RoseyR
Posts: 464
Joined: Feb 2011

When diagnosed with stage 1B uterine carcinosarcoma, I did all the reading I could on diet and cancer and even within a week after surgery was doing the following:

NO sugar whatsoever, including honey

NO white break or crackers, just whole grain and this only occasionally

only berries as my fruit--in the mornings on top of my oatmeal

mixed nuts in my oatmeal daily: mostly walnuts, almonds, pecans

lots of green tea: five to six cups a day

lots of brown rice with black beans and brussel sprouts or broccoli, once a day

yams with dinner and lots of cabbage

organic meat only (chicken and turkey, just two to three times a week)

no dairy except for a little organic butter on sweet potatos and plain yogurt once a day
(I have since cut out even yogurt)

whey protein smoothies with a banana and good water (sometimes rice milk) five x a week

during chemo, continued with all the preceding but for lunch often had fava beans, artichokes or asparagus, tabouli salad (couldn't get enough of it; seemed to crave it), a few olives.

gradually begain to eat less meat and more salmon, tuna, and sardines (2-3 times a week)

SUPPLEMENTS:

A week after surgery, took Pecta-Sol C to try to prevent mets incurred by surgery; should have started a day after surgery, alas. Took it for about two weeks.

After surgery and three weeks before FIRST THREE ROUNDS OF CARBO/TAXOL, started this regimen, prescribed by integrative doctor;

two tsps of fish oil a day
a scoop of ProGreens every morning before breakfast
6 capsules of AHCC a day
two multivitamins (Formula 950--without iron or copper in it)
first three days of chemo, starting a day before chemo - 1 tsp of glutamine in water x 3
200 mgs of vitamin E succinate x 2 (I added this based on my own research)
__________

DURING 25 external pelvic radiation sessions

one scoop of ProGreens each morning
three tsps of fish oil a day
6 capsules of AHCC a day
two multivitamins
500 mgs curcumin x 3
90 mgs of zinc chelate a day
ADDED BASED ON OWN RESEARCH;
200 mgs of vitamin E succinate
60 mgs of Ginko x 2
20 mgs of melatonin a night (started with 5 mgs, worked up to 20)
1,000 mgs of shark liver oil a day (to prevent internal injury from radiation)

DURING LAST THREE ROUNDS OF TAXOL/CARBO

Same regimen as first three rounds of carbo/taxol but this time added:
curcumin 500 x 3
20 mgs of melatonin a night
3-6 capsules of astragalus a day IF my neutrophil counts were low; this really works.

After 4th treatment, had to reduce fish oil and vitamin E due to low platelet counts; took nearly none until two weeks agao, when I resumed.

_______________________

Had absolutely no side effects during chemo or radiation, not even fatigue or loss of appetite. I didn't catch a cold even once in nine months of treatment. The only effects were hair loss and--after fourth chemo session--low platelets and low hemoglobin for nearly two months, causing need to postpone 5th treatment by two weeks although was able to have my sixth treatment on time, albeit with slightly lower dosage of carboplatin.
____________________________

MAINTENANCE PROGRAM

Now that platelets are coming back up, have resumed fish oil.

ProGreens- one scoop each morning
AHCC - six capsules a day (can cut in half in two months, I'm told)
fish oil - two tsps a day
Formula 950 - two capsules with meals x 3 times a day
Stress Formula (rhodeola rosea plus ashwaganda) to boost energy (2 capsules in morning)

At my doctor's suggestion, I MAY soon add Naxeltrone (LDN) at 1.5 mgs a day: a very low dose and work up to 3.5 mgs. Research continues to show it may help to keep certain cancers in remission far longer than if one doesn't take it. (Since my own tumor is highly recurrent--often recurring within six months after treatment--I want to do anything possible to delay recurrence.) Am due for first 3-month checkup Monday; if OK, will soon start on LDN.

CURRENT DIET

Like most of us, am still struggling a bit to figure it all out. Try to limit fruit to just berries and one banana a day. Try to eat NO meat unless it's organic and this, no more than three times a week. Try to drink lots of water and green tea. Try to eat only whole grains and little if any white bread. (Admit I cheated a few times by eating a small sourdough rye roll when eating out a few times in August. Generally, have no white bread products.)

Recently, just a few weeks ago upon return to full time work, resumed coffee just in the morning, with a little guilt. Always have "Americano" at local coffee house each morning as it's delicious and supposedly lower in caffeine. And although never drank during treatment, have been drinking a glass of red wine two to three nights a week with my dinner (out) but suspecting that maybe I shouldn't. (Schreiber says it's fine; so does Dr. R. Blaylock.) My only "treat" is a whole-grain bar made with blueberries (organic) and sesame seeds, oats, whole grains, no sugar: made by my local health food restaurant. They were the FIRST sweet tasting entity I'd had in nearly a year, so to be honest, I hve one nearly every day. If any of you suspect I should stop eating them, let me know.

Best,
Rosey

Am eating nearly the same diet as sustained during chemo. Ate red meat only five to six times after fourth round of chemo when hemoglobin was low. Organic, of course.

california_artist's picture
california_artist
Posts: 860
Joined: Jan 2009

Know for a fact that chemo brain is not a problem.
Thank you so much for sharing all you've done. I have a few quick questions. Did you take your curcumin/turmeric at the same time as pepper/olive oil or did you take it on it's own?

Do you know if your cancer cells are ER/PR - or +? Cabbage, which I see you are eating turns the strongest cancer promoting estrogens into the weaker non cancer causing estrogen.

Have you looked into LIfe Expectancy by Dr. Miller?

What types of things did you study from to get where you are? Books, dvd's, urls, anything at all might help.

Do you have green tea with or without lemon? I am asking to get a stronger handle on what it is people are doing in addition to the usual. Things that might give someone else some ideas to work with and discuss with their doctors if they felt they wanted to.

If you don't mind could you say something about these?
Do you get blood tests?
What is your normal body temp?
Do you know your potassium number. Was it ever low?
Do you have things with artificial sweeteners.
Do you have ginger, raw?
Have you had albumin and/pr C-RP taken?

With all that you do, do you feel it is just too much trouble. How do you feel about what you're doing?

Thanks so very much.

Love ya oodles,

Claudia

After reading your statement, I took another look at whey and was very impressed with this:

Animal models, usually for colon and mammary tumorigenesis, nearly always show that whey protein is superior to other dietary proteins for suppression of tumour development. This benefit is attributed to its high content of cystine/cysteine and gamma-glutamylcyst(e)ine dipeptides, which are efficient substrates for the synthesis of glutathione. Glutathione is an ubiquitous cellular antioxidant that directly or through its associated enzymes destroys reactive oxygen species, detoxifies carcinogens, maintains proteins in a reduced state and ensures a competent immune system. Various experiments showed that tumour prevention by dietary whey protein was accompanied by increased glutathione levels in serum and tissues as well as enhanced splenic lymphocyte proliferation, phagocytosis and natural killer, T helper and cytotoxic T cell activity. Whey protein components, beta-lactoglobulin, alpha-lactalbumin and serum albumin were studied infrequently, but results suggest they have anticancer potential. The minor component lactoferrin has received the most attention; it inhibits intestinal tumours and perhaps tumours at other sites. Lactoferrin acts by induction of apoptosis, inhibition of angiogenesis, modulation of carcinogen metabolising enzymes and perhaps acting as an iron scavenger. Supplementing cows with selenium increases the content of selenoproteins in milk, which on isolation inhibited colon tumorigenesis in rats.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17430183

National institue of health

Natural Killer cells are so important.

do you have a particular supplier for your whey or other supplements that you would feel comfortable mentioning?

RoseyR
Posts: 464
Joined: Feb 2011

Claudia,

The most vital part of my supplement program throughout, according to my doctor, was vitamin D3. My initial level was 24 (very low, typical of newly diagnosed cancer patients); he wanted it up to 50-60 ASAP.

So throughout treatment was taking Liqui-D drops (3-5 drops a day, each equivalent to 2,000 IU) depending on what my blood tests showed. Took five drops a day for a month or so to get levels up even to 50. Have been hovering around 45 recently so am again boosting drops to four a day; optimum level of D for cancer patients is said to be 50-60 but not higher.

As for green tea: no, alas, rarely took it with lemon; was afraid of too much fruit.
But tried to make it organic green tea as often as possible because had read that inorganic teas (of many kinds) are high in fluoride, no friend of cancer patients.

I love ginger and have it occasionaly in a stir fry but haven't taken it daily; probably I should. Will try to add it more often.

Yes, had blood tested every two weeks--often by the cancer treatment center but also by my internist, whose tests are so much more thorough than the cancer center's. (The center NEVER tests for vitamin D levels, or B-12 levels--which if low can cause real havoc during chemo, inviting neuropathy from taxol--or even iron/ferritin levels, which should not be too high in cancer patients.)

Indeed, I was told by the chemo nurse when my hemoglobin was low to "take some iron" when to have done so would have been dangerous, for my ferritin levels (discovered only by my integrative doctor) were way too high, probably from the two transfusions I needed at the end. The chemo nurse also told me it was "fine" to have glass of wine "or two" (!!!) during chemo. No it wasn't, which I found out on my own. My platelets at that time were very low, which she knew--and alcohol further reduces platelets. So I was twice given dangerous misinformation, which Is ANOTHER reason to see an integrative doctor and not rely solely on what we're told by "cancer treatment centers," even mine, reputedly one of the ten best in the nation.

Blood tests showed that my potassium was always within normal range, even during treatment (probably from the daily glass of ProGreens my integrative doctor prescribed), my albumin was never seriously low, always normal; and my CR-P was always low, under .01, which is where Dr. Keith Block wants to see it, ideally, in his own cancer patients.

My body temperature, on other hand, was often a bit low--as it had been for years. (Cold hands and feet were hardly new symptoms for me, especially during fall and winter) and my temperature at the center was often 97.4 or even a bit lower.
It seemed to come up gradually after six months: from what, I am not sure. (New supplements? Subtle change in diet?)

My blood pressure, by the way, which had hovered at 140 over 80 a year before diagnosis (borderline high) has now come down--get this--to 110 over 70 (on average). Obviously some of this decline has come from a major loss of weight tht occurred within nine months of diagnosis: NOT from treatment, but from my immediate decision, upon diagnosis, to change my diet in a major way to be as healthy as possible.

Thoughout my thirties, I was still pretty slender--and even taught aerobic dance as an avocation for a few years.
At diagnosis, I weighed (shamefully) about 160. Much of that weight had been gained around the age of fifty (peri to post menopause). I had NOT eaten many sweets in the year or two before diagnosis but HAD loved my rich cheeses and glass or two of wine a few nights a week. Spicy and rich food had been my recent proclivities, with few sweets beyond the weekend "cheese danish" that I loved.

But as soon as diagnosed, I cut out all sugar--including artificial sweeteners, which I knew were dangerous--and nearly all white flour products as well as rich cheeses and wine. (Had never drunk alcohol even in college, for my friends hadn't drunk
alcohol at that time. Had my first drink when I was thirty! In following decades was a very moderate social drinker--and always just wine. About three years before diagnosis, however, a new group of friends I socialized with typically met two to three nights a week--we usually had a glass or two of wine with appetizers and I grew to enjoy this. But I was putting on weight, vowing to take it off although my job was so consuming that I rarely got to the gym although I always did walk a great deal through the city.

By simply cutting out sugar, white flour products and wine (and of course increasing vegetables and brown rice), I have lost 35 pounds since diagnosis last September. Everyone tells me I look GREAT and I frankly agree. (If you'd told me I'd ever be a size ten again, I would have laughed in your face! It's a joy to shop for size eight clothing as I did in graduate school. When I began chemo I was already down to 132. So the only time that my weight declined during treatment was during five weeks of radiation, when I seemed to drop about five to six pounds. Since then have been stable at about 125.

Where did I get most of my information on how to change diet? Schreiber's book Anti-Cancer was what I started with. Then read Quillen's book, then Russell Blaylock's, then Michael Murray's, then Keith Block's. Whatever their small differences, they agreed that sugar had to go, artificial sweeteners had to go, and too much red meat was a no no. A few sanctioned a glass of red wine as long as it is drunk with meals so blood sugar doesn't spike suddenly.

As for turmeric/olive oil, and black pepper, here's how I did it.

After diagnosis and hysterectomy, I often made lunch of stir-fried vegetables with turmeric, olive oil and pepper. This went on for about six weeks. Alas, after chemo started, I had that dish only once or twice a week but has started to tke curcumin by capsule (brand: Meriva or Life Extension). All throughout radiation and last three rounds of chemo, took curucumin capsules most days with a tablespoon of olive oil. Since treatment ended, have to admit I often take the capsules just by themselves given their allegedly superior bioabsorbability.

And tonight am heading out to an Indian restaurant where I hope to get a hearty dose of turmeric and olive oil in the dishes I order!

Sorry if all this detail is exhausting, but you did ask for exhaustive information.

Love,
Rosey

RoseyR
Posts: 464
Joined: Feb 2011

Claudia,

The most vital part of my supplement program throughout, according to my doctor, was vitamin D3. My initial level was 24 (very low, typical of newly diagnosed cancer patients); he wanted it up to 50-60 ASAP.

So throughout treatment was taking Liqui-D drops (3-5 drops a day, each equivalent to 2,000 IU) depending on what my blood tests showed. Took five drops a day for a month or so to get levels up even to 50. Have been hovering around 45 recently so am again boosting drops to four a day; optimum level of D for cancer patients is said to be 50-60 but not higher.

As for green tea: no, alas, rarely took it with lemon; was afraid of too much fruit.
But tried to make it organic green tea as often as possible because had read that inorganic teas (of many kinds) are high in fluoride, no friend of cancer patients.

I love ginger and have it occasionaly in a stir fry but haven't taken it daily; probably I should. Will try to add it more often.

Yes, had blood tested every two weeks--often by the cancer treatment center but also by my internist, whose tests are so much more thorough than the cancer center's. (The center NEVER tests for vitamin D levels, or B-12 levels--which if low can cause real havoc during chemo, inviting neuropathy from taxol--or even iron/ferritin levels, which should not be too high in cancer patients.)

Indeed, I was told by the chemo nurse when my hemoglobin was low to "take some iron" when to have done so would have been dangerous, for my ferritin levels (discovered only by my integrative doctor) were way too high, probably from the two transfusions I needed at the end. The chemo nurse also told me it was "fine" to have glass of wine "or two" (!!!) during chemo. No it wasn't, which I found out on my own. My platelets at that time were very low, which she knew--and alcohol further reduces platelets. So I was twice given dangerous misinformation, which Is ANOTHER reason to see an integrative doctor and not rely solely on what we're told by "cancer treatment centers," even mine, reputedly one of the ten best in the nation.

Blood tests showed that my potassium was always within normal range, even during treatment (probably from the daily glass of ProGreens my integrative doctor prescribed), my albumin was never seriously low, always normal; and my CR-P was always low, under .01, which is where Dr. Keith Block wants to see it, ideally, in his own cancer patients.

My body temperature, on other hand, was often a bit low--as it had been for years. (Cold hands and feet were hardly new symptoms for me, especially during fall and winter) and my temperature at the center was often 97.4 or even a bit lower.
It seemed to come up gradually after six months: from what, I am not sure. (New supplements? Subtle change in diet?)

My blood pressure, by the way, which had hovered at 140 over 80 a year before diagnosis (borderline high) has now come down--get this--to 110 over 70 (on average). Obviously some of this decline has come from a major loss of weight tht occurred within nine months of diagnosis: NOT from treatment, but from my immediate decision, upon diagnosis, to change my diet in a major way to be as healthy as possible.

Thoughout my thirties, I was still pretty slender--and even taught aerobic dance as an avocation for a few years.
At diagnosis, I weighed (shamefully) about 160. Much of that weight had been gained around the age of fifty (peri to post menopause). I had NOT eaten many sweets in the year or two before diagnosis but HAD loved my rich cheeses and glass or two of wine a few nights a week. Spicy and rich food had been my recent proclivities, with few sweets beyond the weekend "cheese danish" that I loved.

But as soon as diagnosed, I cut out all sugar--including artificial sweeteners, which I knew were dangerous--and nearly all white flour products as well as rich cheeses and wine. (Had never drunk alcohol even in college, for my friends hadn't drunk
alcohol at that time. Had my first drink when I was thirty! In following decades was a very moderate social drinker--and always just wine. About three years before diagnosis, however, a new group of friends I socialized with typically met two to three nights a week--we usually had a glass or two of wine with appetizers and I grew to enjoy this. But I was putting on weight, vowing to take it off although my job was so consuming that I rarely got to the gym although I always did walk a great deal through the city.

By simply cutting out sugar, white flour products and wine (and of course increasing vegetables and brown rice), I have lost 35 pounds since diagnosis last September. Everyone tells me I look GREAT and I frankly agree. (If you'd told me I'd ever be a size ten again, I would have laughed in your face! It's a joy to shop for size eight clothing as I did in graduate school. When I began chemo I was already down to 132. So the only time that my weight declined during treatment was during five weeks of radiation, when I seemed to drop about five to six pounds. Since then have been stable at about 125.

Where did I get most of my information on how to change diet? Schreiber's book Anti-Cancer was what I started with. Then read Quillen's book, then Russell Blaylock's, then Michael Murray's, then Keith Block's. Whatever their small differences, they agreed that sugar had to go, artificial sweeteners had to go, and too much red meat was a no no. A few sanctioned a glass of red wine as long as it is drunk with meals so blood sugar doesn't spike suddenly.

As for turmeric/olive oil, and black pepper, here's how I did it.

After diagnosis and hysterectomy, I often made lunch of stir-fried vegetables with turmeric, olive oil and pepper. This went on for about six weeks. Alas, after chemo started, I had that dish only once or twice a week but has started to tke curcumin by capsule (brand: Meriva or Life Extension). All throughout radiation and last three rounds of chemo, took curucumin capsules most days with a tablespoon of olive oil. Since treatment ended, have to admit I often take the capsules just by themselves given their allegedly superior bioabsorbability.

And tonight am heading out to an Indian restaurant where I hope to get a hearty dose of turmeric and olive oil in the dishes I order!

Sorry if all this detail is exhausting, but you did ask for exhaustive information.

Love,
Rosey

Gracegoi's picture
Gracegoi
Posts: 59
Joined: Aug 2011

Why is it that sometimes when I hit post it doesn't work.

just lost my hours worth of work.

;-(((((((((((((

((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((

california_artist's picture
california_artist
Posts: 860
Joined: Jan 2009

First, thanks for taking the time to write about your experience.
Second, I used to have that happen to me sometimes too. So what I've taken to doing is to write what I have to say in a word document first, then select it all, copy and paste it here.

I hope some other time you'd be willing to rewrite, in word and then post here as everything that seems to have worked is important.

Thanks again,

claudia

Gracegoi's picture
Gracegoi
Posts: 59
Joined: Aug 2011

Diet Part one

When I found out I had cancer I was in touch with a woman on line battling stage 3 colon cancer. I began reading all of what she did diet wise.

I purchased a juicer and began juicing immediately. I began looking into herbs having had an herbal back ground.

People were suggesting to make changes. This made sense to me . When an addict begins recovery its suggested to change friends because all the old buddies were using Buds.

So here are the changes I made with the prodding of people on the Internet and off.

I began juicing every morning
I took apple cider vinegar in the mornings. ( this lasted about three weeks only.)

I began putting lemon in sparkling water.

That lasted for a short time because I started juicing ginger.

Each morning I would juice about 4 oz of ginger root. 1 oz. I would combine with Celery juice and I mixed in two teaspoons of turmeric.

I'd drink that nasty concoction followed by my juice which consisted of numerous veggies and fruits.

Always kale, celery carrots , apple, as base stables

Usually another green source such as cabbage or broccoli cucumbers.

And additional fruit or two such as strawberries , grapes . melon, pear .

fruits in season and on sale would dictate did not use organic. The amount of fruit and veggies I was using every day would have had me running up a visa card I could not pay off each month.

Not interested in doing that.

My tea.

The other 3 oz. ginger plus the ginger pulp went into a large tea strainer you can find at world market. Good luck finding a tea kettle with a large enough opening. I knew what I wanted and My higher power presented it all for me.
World market sells the large strainer just not a kettle it can fit into. :-?

Along with the ginger I put in

Two heaping tablespoons (HTBLS). of gunpowder green tea loose,

Two HTBLS Burdock root
Two HTBLS Dandelion root
One HTBLS Astragalus root
One HTBLS Ashwagandha root
One HTBLS Dried rosemary leaf From the garden
One HTBLS Of lavender from the garden
A Handful of red clover blossums

Brought to a boil and steeped in around six cups of water

usually another cup added by ice and or water to run through the tea Bowl.

I put it in a quart thermous to drink during work and drank the remainder into the evening.

I have done this for over two years now . I rarely miss a day

This past spring I began juicing less. I believe its because I would make my tea every other day drinking only four cups a day.

I sweeten it with stevia . Its fabulous Iced. I make half sized ice cubes out of the tea.so they fit into the thermous

Its cold and tingly . In the winter I fix it hot . There is nothing else I wish to drink. I am absolutely in love with it and was thinking the other day. I hope , and its about time , something I love to consume is actually GOOD for me .

Lipton's citrus green tea ( splenda water with food coloring) makes me laugh when I look at it now .

The reason I choose the herbs I did had to do with MY CT scan showing tiny liver lesions. These herbs help cleanse the liver .

I recently read your not supposed to use some of the herbs longer than two weeks,,

Opps! LOL!

Some other changes I made was to

-throw out my microwave,
-filter all my drinking water,

Stop all carbonated sodas.
-Stop drinking coffee . That lasted six months.

I got the apple cider vinegar,lemon , turmeric . and ginger from Claudia

Also the idea of making tea and drinking it through out the day. The herbs came from my own research,

the microwave and splenda tossing came from a local friend.

Theres more but thats all for now.

Grace

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

What is the status of the liver lesions?

I think you have done a fantastic job. I have also given up the microwave. I did not stick to the juicing. I guess I wonder if it does a significantly BETTER job than eating the whole fruit/veggie. Can someone explain? There is so much good stuff that just gets thrown away.

Mary Ann

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

I purchased a Jack LaLane Juicer at beginning of my diagnosis in 2009, but have today changed to no juices but eating the whole foods. Bottom line, with juicing we miss many of the parts of the foods, plus lots of pulp which is a critical part of the digestive process.

Article brings up many good points to ponder on.

Jan

---------------------

TO JUICE OR NOT TO JUICE, THAT IS THE QUESTION !

Fruits and vegetables are made up of nutrients, fiber, and water. Our bodies are designed to consume whole foods and not processed foods. Each individual part is very important as an integral part of the package. Two parts without the third is not the ideal way to consume the food. Juicing takes out the fiber and all of the stage 2 juice that’s in the pulp and dehydrating takes out the pristine alkaline structured water. Juice from a juicer is not whole food - it’s considered processed because the fiber with its phytonutrients has been removed.

Both juicing and dehydrating are processes that seem like a good idea but in reality are very wasteful of valuable ingredients of a food not to mention the amount of time required for the juicing or dehydrating process. Consuming more vitamins and minerals from fruits and vegetables is what we want to stay healthy or regain health so, at first glance, juicing seems to make sense. We are told that we don’t need the fiber and it’s just there to hold the juice together. Marketing hype often hides the real truth. People often make a decision to buy a juicer after hearing only the marketing hype and not looking into the whole truth and the other options. Blending is an option that is backed up by science which says whole foods are the healthiest way to eat.

Juicers are a multibillion dollar industry. As with any business, you will get the marketing hype and “facts” that may not include the whole truth. The whole truth is that whole foods are the healthiest things to eat. Nature intended us to eat whole foods not only part of a food.

Juicer promoters talk about how quickly the juice gets into the blood stream leading you to believe it’s a good thing, not realizing that it gets into the blood stream too quickly. Juice will spike your blood sugar and cause other problems the body has to then deal with. It can be counter-productive and do more damage than good. The fiber allows the nutrients to enter the blood stream at the perfect speed - not too fast and not too slow. The body will also process the 2nd stage juice that is bound up in the pulp.

You will hear a lot of testimonies from people who use juicers about how they were healed of health problems. In reality, they were probably healed because along with the juicing they stopped consuming the kinds of foods that promote disease - meat, dairy, and processed foods. Their health would be much better and regained much quicker with whole foods.

The pulp or fiber in fruits and vegetables acts like a broom inside our digestive tract. It’s a very critical part of the digestive process. Without the pulp, the system slows down and can even stall - constipation. If you drink juice you then have to get your fiber elsewhere so why not blend everything together and eat whole foods.

It’s always better to eat whole foods. The combination of water, fiber, nutrients and phytochemicals is always perfect for what our bodies were designed to eat. The fiber that is discarded in juicing helps to slow down the absorption of sugar into the blood. Juice will cause the blood sugar to rise just like it does with a can of soda, especially the new hybrid carrots with their unnaturally high sugar content. The reason people love carrot juice is because it is feeding their sugar addiction but in reality they are just trading one sugar drink for another.

We can easily eat a few carrots at a time and be satisfied. However, a glass of carrot juice can contain a pound or more of carrots. How long would it take to eat a pound of carrots? Our bodies don’t need that flood of excess nutrients. We have a tendency to believe if a little is good then a lot must be better. So with juicing, we get way too much sugar, way to fast and even though our standard American diet is fiber poor anyway, we thrown away something our bodies desperately needs. Fiber is actually a nutrient that we need. Overall, juicing doesn’t make much sense when you look at all the facts.

Juicing gives us incomplete nutrition from a carrot or anything else we might juice because juicing wastes a lot of the nutrients that are trapped in the fiber. Blending with a powerful blender will break up the fiber and when the fiber is broken up at the cellular level, it releases the phytochemicals that were bound up in it. These phytochemicals aren’t released from the pulp when put through a juicer. They remain in the pulp that is thrown away.

We should consume whole foods because every part of a whole food is needed for proper assimilation of the nutrients. The fiber and the phytochemicals that are bound up in it are very important to be consumed together. The Creator of our bodies also created the food that was designed to nourish that body. He knew exactly what we needed to maintain vibrant health. He created whole foods for a reason.

The blending process does, more efficiently and quickly, what our teeth are designed to do. Chewing is a very important part of eating. Most of us take a bite of something, chew a few times, and then swallow mostly chunky food. Studies have shown that those who live to be over 120+ years old spend many hours eating. They will take many hours to eat one apple. Their teeth grind the food up and all the stage 2 juice is released from the food - something that the stomach is not designed to do. The expression, “drink your food and chew your drink” makes a lot of sense.

Juicing seems to be an excuse for some people to justify continuing to eat junk food or their calorie dense, high fat, nutrient light - “comfort foods”. They think a little bit of good will balance out the bad.

With more to think about, you can now make a more intelligent decision about whether to juice or blend.

Remember, WHOLE FOODS RULE!

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daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

Thanks, Jan. I knew I was thinking correctly!!!! Nice picture, by the way.

Taking these Food for Life classes, has really opened my eyes to the importance of fiber - not only does it help move things along in the digestive process, it helps remove excess and potentially harmful hormones from our system. Note: the ONLY way they get out is by fiber. Otherwise they are recycled again through body including liver and gallbladder.

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snowbird_11
Posts: 160
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Some months back my husband pulled out his old juicer to get us healthier and the amount of good fiber, etc., that was to be tossed was too much for me. Now I blenderize 4 cups of greens (spinach usually, sometimes kale) with banana, fresh herb greens (basil, mint), cayenne, almond milk plus my daily customizing of adding olive oil/turmeric/black pepper, raw ginger, berries, etc. as the spirit moves me. Quick, easy and so tasty!
Annie

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california_artist
Posts: 860
Joined: Jan 2009

I too would look at all that good fiber and peel and think that throwing it out is just not right. So, plan b, go ahead and use the juicer if you like, but rather than throw out the remaining parts, just add them to sauces, soups veggie chili, scrambled eggs, whatever. Then you can enjoy your pulp free juice to drink smoothly and not waste any of the veggie or fruit.

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Gracegoi
Posts: 59
Joined: Aug 2011

That eating the whole food is better than just juicing. I only posted part one of my diet. I eat lots of raw veggies for dinner so I get the BETTER of both worlds.

I have thought about getting one of the high powered blender soup makers. Just not into spending 300.00 for one. I don't want it that much.

This paragraph tells why I juice in the morning only.

Juicing also ensures that the body is getting sufficient amounts of phytochemicals, substances in plants that are considered among the most powerful ways to fight disease. While most people do not eat enough raw fruits and vegetables to obtain the amount of phytochemicals that would make a difference, it is relatively easy to drink enough juice to obtain sufficient amounts of these powerful nutrients. In addition, antioxidants and other immune enhancing properties are concentrated in juices.

I wonder just how much nutrients are in the plup VS the juice, I have never seen a study.

Mary Ann ,

I have no idea what the lesions are up to. I was offered a CT scan in September. I opted for a CA125 only and if it was elevated then I would have one. Since it went from 5 to 4 I figured The lesions are not UPSC. If it was I'd be in trouble in over two years time.

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

You must have found the right formula for you!!! Terrific. I don't think I've ever had a ca125 that low. Good for you.

Mary Ann

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jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

How does fruit juice compare to whole fruit?

You'll notice that on our website we've listed all of World's Healthiest Fruits in whole food form, and that no fruit juices are specifically mentioned as the preferred form for your Healthier Way of Eating. The reason for this emphasis on whole fruits versus fruit juices is simple: regardless of the fruit and regardless of the method used for juicing, the most diverse and intact collection of nutrients comes to you through the whole fruit!

What's missing in fruit juice.

Whole fruit provides you with a whole lot more nutrition that fruit juice. Focusing upon two components of fruit - the skin and the pulp - will help to clarify why there is such a difference between the two.

The benefits of fruit skins

The edible skins of many of the World's Healthiest Fruits - including apples, apricots, blueberries, figs, grapes, pears, plums, prunes, raisins, raspberries, and strawberries - are all sites of important biological activity in the life of the fruit. The skin is one of the places where the fruit interacts with sunlight, and forms a variety of colored pigments that absorb different wavelengths of light. These pigments, including carotenoids and flavonoids, are well researched as nutrients that protect our health and nourishment. The skins of whole fruits like grapes have actually been studied for their ability to help lower risk of cancer and help provide protection from ultraviolet light.

Unfortunately, when fruits are juiced, we don't always get to enjoy the fruit's skin. That is because many juicing processes remove the skin, and do not allow for its full benefits to get into the juice.

The benefits of the fruit pulp

In addition to the skin, which is an important source of fiber in most fruits, the pulpy part of the fruit is also a source of fiber (and other nutrients). Orange juice makes a good example of the health difference when you focus on the issue of its pulp. The white pulpy part of the orange is the primary source of its flavonoids. The juicy orange-colored sections of the orange contain most of its vitamin C. In the body, flavonoids and vitamin C often work together, and support health through their interaction. When the pulpy white part of the orange is removed in the processing of orange juice, the flavonoids in the orange are lost in the process. This loss of flavonoids is one of the many reasons for eating the orange in its whole food form (even if you only end up eating a little bit of the white pulpy part). Although many commercial products will say "pulp added" on their labels, the "pulp added" many not even be the original pulp found in the whole fruit, and it is highly unlikely to be added back in the amount removed.

Juicing reduces the fiber content

How much fiber is lost in the conversion from whole fruit to fruit juice? Let's use apples and apple juice as an example.

A cup of apple juice that you can see straight through (pulp removed) contains no measurable amount of fiber. To create this 8-ounce glass of juice, approximately 3-4 apples are needed (depending, of course, on the size and density of the apples). Each of these 3-4 apples contains about 3.75 grams of dietary fiber, for a total of about 12-15 grams of dietary fiber. Virtually all of these 12-15 grams are lost in the production of clear apple juice! These 12-15 grams of lost fiber, if added back into the juice, would fully double our average daily fiber intake!

Is fruit juice unhealthy?

The answer to this question depends on how it's consumed, and what foods it replaces. Fruit juice that has been robbed of its fiber and broad range of nutrients is basically just a concentrated source of sugar that lacks the supportive nutrients to help it digest and metabolize. Fruit juice elevates blood sugar more quickly than whole fruit, and the level of sugar that can be obtained from fruit juice is higher than the level found in whole fruit. For example, 120 calories' worth of whole apples contains about 24 grams of sugar, while 120 calories' worth of apple juice contains about 30 grams.

Additionally, many fruit juices that are sold in supermarkets contain only a small percentage of real fruit juice, and contain added sweeteners (sucrose or high fructose corn syrup). As a result, it is easy to consume a large amount of calories without getting any actual nutrition when you consume these beverages. Make sure you read fruit juice labels carefully! Turn over on the back of the jar or bottle, and look over the ingredient list - you may be surprised to see exactly where the fruit itself fits in!

Practical tips

If fruit juice is the only "convenience" choice for replacing a canned soda pop, we're all in favor of fruit juice versus soda pop. If fruits are juiced together with vegetables, the pulp is retained, and juicing allows a person to increase his or her intake of vegetables substantially, then we also would support this step (especially if you use a home juicer that allowed close to 100% retention of the pulp and skin.) However, in most cases, the switch from whole fruit to fruit juice can only be made at the expense of full nourishment and health.

References

Birt, D. F.; Pelling, J. C.; Nair, S., and Lepley, D. Diet intervention for modifying cancer risk. Prog Clin Biol Res. 1996; 395:223-34.

Boss, P. K.; Davies, C., and Robinson, S. P. Expression of anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway genes in red and white grapes. Plant Mol Biol. 1996 Nov; 32(3):565-9.

Kootstra, A. Protection from UV-B-induced DNA damage by flavonoids. Plant Mol Biol. 1994 Oct; 26(2):771-4.

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kkstef
Posts: 706
Joined: May 2008

Jan,

First off, I love you new picture....you look terrific!

Thanks for the great discussion on juice/whole fruits. My daughter is doing some juicing these days and I had thought about it but felt there was a great deal of "good things" getting tossed. I guess one can add back in the pulp, but wonder what that texture might be like. Claudia's idea to save the pulp and put it back into soups etc. is a good idea.

But, in the meantime I will just consume whole food....

Karen

Gracegoi's picture
Gracegoi
Posts: 59
Joined: Aug 2011

important

california_artist's picture
california_artist
Posts: 860
Joined: Jan 2009

As I was drifting off last night I thought, homemade bread would be a wonderful spot to put in some of the things the juicer leaves behind. High fiber bread, especially if one can get organic is a nice addition.

Life is about balance. Juice if you like, it's fun and encourages you to have more fruits and veggies, and use the residue elswhere, even the garden as banana peels are great for the garden, ah, I could be still partly/mostly asleep, late night.

Love ya,

Claudia

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jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

Thanks for the nice compliment! Took me a while to get the picture up as getting old with me at the beach.

When I used the Jack LaLanne machine it would take out all the skin, seeds, stems and spit out in another part of device. Book suggested keeping the misc. for additions to soups, etc. What I found, it wasn't easy and many times in freezer and have to thaw out. Therefore, I didn't use it but throw it out.

My nutritionist told me to stick with " whole food" and try to avoid lots of juicing and supplements. She even suggested I consume the whole food with seeds, and any other parts inside the fruit/vegie. Today that's my goal and if I do juice it's on occasion.

Hugs,
Karen

RoseyR
Posts: 464
Joined: Feb 2011

Have followed all these comments with interest and want to add one caveat.

I agree that juicing too often replaces the pulp, the healthy fiber, of the fruit and vegetable with juice that raises our blood sugar far too quickly.

But that's the reason that the KIND of juicer we get, according to some sources such as Dr. Russell Blaylock, makes all the difference; he advocates one that leaves NO pulp or fiber behind but grinds it all into a smooth liquid. And although I bought one such mixer (The Vita-Mix) last summer, plunking down nearly four hundred dollars on it, have to admit I've used it rarely so far--partly because I PREFER juices and soups with little chunks in them rather than a smooth blend but more so because have been too busy, even returning to full-time work this fall, to do anything but eat out twice a day (an expense of its own!).

I intend to juice once a day when I go on sabbatical leave in January; I'll have many months off to create a new daily routine.

Has anyone else read that juicing is good ONLY via a mixer, rather than a blender, because the former preserves the pulp and all?

Rosey

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

Hi Rosey,

In the Food for Life classes the Vita-Mix was used. Seems like great machine. It seemed to be a very high end blender. They told us that if we did not have a Vita Mix that we should blend things for a LONGER time. I have been making smoothies using fruits and veggies with my personal blender. I have even put in grapes -seeds and all - and it has blended things nicely.

Mary Ann

carolenk's picture
carolenk
Posts: 909
Joined: Feb 2011

Just want to mention kumquats are a good source of d-limonene:
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D-limonene is a terpene, a compound found in plants. The best source of d-limonene is the oil from orange peels. Researchers at the University of Wisconsin found that when d-limonene was added to the diets of rats who had developed tumors, 90% of them had their tumors disappear completely. In a related study, animals that were given d-limonene one hour before being exposed to known carcinogens, were protected from the effects of the carcinogens at a highly significant rate.

In rats, large doses of d-limonene produce kidney problems, but in dogs, there were no side effects.

D-limonene has yet to be tested on humans, and since very little of the two billion spent annually on cancer research ever makes it to clinical studies, it might never be tested on humans to determine dosages and toxicity levels, if there are any.

In the meanwhile, you can do what most juice experts have been saying for years: juice the orange and the peel together—just make sure your oranges are organically grown. [Alternatives, September 1991; 4: 3]
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Kumquat season is from November to March.

JoAnnDK
Posts: 276
Joined: Jun 2011

Coffee drinkers show lower uterine cancer risks

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/11/22/us-coffee-cancer-idUSTRE7AL22120111122

Gracegoi's picture
Gracegoi
Posts: 59
Joined: Aug 2011

I heard this on the news Joann. I couldn't help but breack out laughing. I just read the artical first half and I continued some more laughter.

a 26 year study for coffee. why Not soda pop? Just "wine"ing here. ( LOL) Why do they test the most common foods. maybe because they are the most highly consistantly consumed foods.

Some day after we are long gone.They may start a study on herbal use. But as the study pointed out as with any study , our diets and life styles and other factors make it almost impossible to pinpoint what does and does not work,

BY the way I drank four cups daily for years prior.

I have been looking at whole juicers.

I said . "looking"

Grace

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