CSN Login
Members Online: 8

Just could not go to radation today

rarph123
Posts: 60
Joined: Jul 2011

Hard to swallow,can'nt eat and ready to throw the towel in.For some reason I,m up&down all night urnating--nurse said that when I had chemo that they add a chemical to flush your kidneys. Has anyone had this problem?

This is only my 2nd wk. of cemo on Fri. & radation the other five days-does it get better or what--this 1st wk is a killer

Lelia's picture
Lelia
Posts: 98
Joined: Jun 2011

Do you have anyone checking on you, a spouse or SO or any type of caregiver? It's an awful lot to handle alone, I worry when I read your posts.

arndog64's picture
arndog64
Posts: 536
Joined: Mar 2011

I am too worried. Keep up the fight and come to the board daily for help and encouragement. We are here for you.. Hugs

Skiffin16's picture
Skiffin16
Posts: 8057
Joined: Sep 2009

Lasix is what the give you to help flush the kidneys....

You should have some kind of meds to help with the nausea, and especially the throat pain when trying to eat or drink....

If you don't have a PEG get one before you consider stopping your treatment...you do what you have to do to get through it...bottom line.

If this is your first week of concurrent(weekly chemo/daily rads), unfortunatley no, it's not going to get better for several weeks after your done (as for the throat pain)...

Talk to your MD's, they'll have a solution for you and get you through it....

Best,
John

Kent Cass's picture
Kent Cass
Posts: 1746
Joined: Nov 2009

My chemo delivery was a bit different than anyone else's, as I carried a Cisplatin pump at the same time as the FU-5 in weeks #1 and #4. I was too sick to make it to any of the rads in week #5, and I started out #6 in the hospital for what turned into 4 mights. When I made the calls in #5 it was like the rad Techs half-expeced I would be too sick, SO, it must not be all that unusual to skip some rads due to current conditions. Important thing- get back to doing the rads just as soon as you are physically able.

kcass

fisrpotpe's picture
fisrpotpe
Posts: 1320
Joined: Aug 2010

I agree with all before me. Prayers for strength, motivation, wisdom going out for you. Need to reach down deep in side and take it one day at a time. Sometimes 5 min. at a time. it is hard on many days, i always thought to myself in trying times, the faster I get done with the nasty treatments the faster i can start to recover.

sportsman
Posts: 98
Joined: Feb 2010

I was pretty much ok through two weeks of treatment. Radiation five days a week and chemo once a week. Then to put it literally all hell broke loose. No sugar coating, this treatment is very tough but I had no choice if I wanted to live. Take all the advice you can get on here because a lot of us on here have rode out the storm. I was diagnosed in December of 2006 and completed treatment in February of 2007 so in February 2012 it will now be five years post treatment. Thank God I am still vertical although I would like to be normal again I have to live with the "new normal". Fight hard, get a good support system and most of all if you are a person of faith, rely on it. May God bless you through this difficult time in your life.

Jimbo55's picture
Jimbo55
Posts: 572
Joined: Jun 2010

Hope things level out for you soon. On the positive side, having to urinate a lot is a good sign in regards to the chemo. It shows you are getting plenty of fluids to keep hydrated, which is very important, and also to flush the chemo through the kidneys, also important. Other than the annoyance of having to get up out bed constantly, overall its probably a good thing.

Sorry to say, its probably going to get worse before it gets better. Speak with your docs about any problems you're having, they should be able to help you out with the pain, nausea etc.

Stay strong and Cheers.

Jimbo

wasil1216
Posts: 16
Joined: Jul 2011

Just wanted to send you comforting thoughts. There are so many caring people here that are praying for you. Please check in often as their stories are so inspirational. many Hugs!

DrMary's picture
DrMary
Posts: 527
Joined: Nov 2010

Many of us lived by this - you can't think about how tough it will get, just think about getting through the next day, hour, minute or second. You can't know what will come - it is likely to get harder, but the last few weeks are often paradoxically easier for some (and some spend them on their backs in the hospital - either way, worrying about it won't help).

It sounds like you might need some assistance getting to radiation - if you don't have someone driving you, call your local ACS chapter about getting a volunteer to drive you.

Talk to your doctor about the best time to take medications in relation to radiation - I tried to time Doug's short-term pain pill to kick in about 30 minutes after radiation. He would usually try to eat something (usually a Boost Plus) on the way home (I was driving him at that point) and then sleep for 3-4 hours after treatment (it was a 40-minute drive). For a few weeks, it was just that - wake, Boost, drive to hospital, pain pill, radiation, drive home/Boost, nap, Boost, nap, Boost, bed (water and other pills in between). Wake up the next day and repeat. A few months later, he was playing hockey again (that's to give you hope - you don't have to play hockey if you don't want to, though).

Give yourself over to this - don't try to do anything else and don't try to do it alone. You will get through this and you will get better.

Keep us posted.

robinleigh's picture
robinleigh
Posts: 297
Joined: Mar 2011

You to get a peg tube if you do not have one and get lots of your nutrition through it. Keep swallowing orally as well so you do not lose swallowing skills. The urinating does show that you are hydrated so that is a good thing. Tell your nurses everything that is bothering you and they should be able to consult with your docs to get you through these rough times that you will get through. You can do it. Do not give up the fight.

TheDane's picture
TheDane
Posts: 27
Joined: Oct 2010

Hey there!

It's HELL.....but you gotta get it done as prescribed. Massive pain killers (i.e. Fentanyl patches) WILL be required.

My first 3 weeks of Rads and Chemo were a breeze....But then...(eek!)

My last week of treatment I had to be in-patient.

And NO...it only gets worse - get those Fentanyl patches.

Use any method and any crutch you can to get through the treatment.

I'm 8 months post treatment, and although my life is still not back to "normal" I must say that NO MATTER HOW HORRIBLE IT IS I WOULD DO IT AGAIN!
Because it does get better.

~Cheers

paaatriot101's picture
paaatriot101
Posts: 17
Joined: Oct 2009

Rarph< Been there done that< been a while since I checked boards here< I am a stage IVB throat cancer survivor, and YES radiation treatments suck big time< BUT> KEEP GOING< Talk to your doctors, let them know what you think, feel, need, beef up your support group< do what you need to do, but do not miss the radiation appointments< I know it's hard, and will no doubt get harder, but you can do it< just do not let yourself slip in to the mind set that it's ok to skip> it is not, it does not help< I had days my support team literally pulled me from bed and MADE me go:) Quite a story there lol< the battle used more effort and energy than just going lol< but I went< BTW< my first week chemo... it was the worst< and as far as PEG tube suggestion, it may be too late to have this done if all ready in treatment< if so a naso tube may help< HANG IN THERE< On the last day of treatment< even though so sick and weak as a newborn< it felt like celebration time:) and clean scans in the following months, and now full year and a half are further cause for joy<

robinleigh's picture
robinleigh
Posts: 297
Joined: Mar 2011

fyi...not too late to get a peg tube. My husband got his after 4th week of radiation. If you lose 10% of your body weight where he was being treated, getting the peg tube is not up for discussion...it is absolutely done.
I agree with all suggestions for you...Do whatever it takes to get your treatment done. Your cancer is considered CURABLE!!!

Pam M's picture
Pam M
Posts: 2194
Joined: Nov 2009

I know we're all different, but for me, the first round of induction chemo was the hardest for me to handle. I dunno if the other two were actually easier, or if having gone through it once took away the fear of the unknown, and I could put up with things I had experience with better. I, too, think that missing a day will not wreck your treatment, but I was/am also a member of the "get it done and out of the way as soon as possible". Really rough patches are not uncommon - I saw some people in my rads waiting area who had to be brought in by wheelchair because they were having a hard time, and temporarily couldn't walk themselves, or couldn't do so safely. Dunno if you have a PEG, but I'm a fan - it really helped me get in calories and water (I could drink water throughout treatment, but not enough went in by mouth). Hope things become easier to handle soon. Let us know either way.

Hondo's picture
Hondo
Posts: 5635
Joined: Apr 2009

It does get worse before it will get better, but we are all here for people like you who are just starting up the road. You will make it and all this will someday be only a memory.

Take care
Hondo

rarph123
Posts: 60
Joined: Jul 2011

Not a good speller but thank you all for posting your support. When they put that mask on me I went side ways--somthing to do with the war--anyways I was too scared to go to the next treatment of radation.Last Sat.to Tuesday Had nothing to eat and very little water.wife rushed me to E.R and spent several days in the hosp--close to the end. They put a tube in me and I'm now getting fluids and supplements. What a support team that got me going again. Today went for rads for B.O.T and lung tratment--tomorrow is 2nd for chemo.--I wonder at times if this is worth it--kids flew down from Okla to wash. just to prey for me and offer support--wife is hanging on so I gotta do my part and fight. Read so many of your post that I would like to say thank you

Kent Cass's picture
Kent Cass
Posts: 1746
Joined: Nov 2009

Might I suggest you advise your rad team that you are with us on the ACS site, and have been advised that a Xanax prescription for taking before the rad session is not unusual?
Yes, I may suggest that, and tell you that my regular Dr/PCP prescribed Xanax for me, and I took a 1/2-tab before most every session after the first week, and it did help me with anxiety. My sessions lasted some 20-25 minutes under the mask, and the saliva/swallowing thing used to get to me. Did help a lot, and I know a few others have used Xanax to help.
IT IS THEIR JOB TO HELP YOU GET THRU IT, AND SUCH A MED AS XANAX IS ENTIRELY WITHIN THE REALM OF DOABLE. Call it panic, or anxiety- it is their job to give you something to help you with it so that you can get thru what is truly necessary- the rads.

kcass

DrMary's picture
DrMary
Posts: 527
Joined: Nov 2010

I think it's worth it, but then I only had to watch. Our chemo guy put it best - H&NC treatment challenges life itself. Not just making you sick, but making it hard to eat, breath, talk. To top it off, they immobilize you while they do the radiation that you know will day after day make your life harder. And they inject you with poisons. How do you fight that?

You don't of course. I think you are reacting to your treatment because you see "fighting cancer" as some kind of action. You don't act against cancer - you hold still while the surgeon cuts it out of you, or while the radiation folks zap it, or while the chemo folks inject stuff. The way you fight is to stop looking at the big picture and see the small picture: your assignment is to do the things those others can't do for you, such as eating when you don't feel like it, showing up for appointments you don't want to make and getting through each day knowing that it's one step closer to the end of treatment.

Accept any help that comes along - Xanax or any of the valium cousins are not to be scorned and I hope your doctor considers them.

It sounds like you have your priorities straight - you do owe it to the kids and wife (and you) to hang in there and fight. Keep reading - there are many inspirational stories on this board. Keep posting - someone will always offer support.

CajunEagle's picture
CajunEagle
Posts: 357
Joined: Oct 2009

That was very well written, and stated in a way that I've been saying to myself since all this started. You're correct. This entire scenerio is a show of love and devotion to yourself, and those that mean so much to you. You can't just let yourself or them down.......so you keep pushing every day.

Larry

Skiffin16's picture
Skiffin16
Posts: 8057
Joined: Sep 2009

Like Kent mentioned, it was definitely what got me through initially..... I didn't need it after a week, but if it helps you through it, keep using what works.

Is it worth it.....

Absolutely and without question.....

I know you are tougher than cancer and certainly treatment....you do what you have to do and get through it.

You mention your wife and children...those are living proof that it's worth it... If you have doubts, ask them. It's not only for your survival, but for them.

Never give up, go kicking and screaming....

Thoughts and Prayers,
John

Hondo's picture
Hondo
Posts: 5635
Joined: Apr 2009

I too am very glad of my support team during treatment, cant say much for the Dr as I only saw him now and then, but the nurses were right there all the time giving me hugs and telling how great I was doing.

All the best
Hondo

tonyb's picture
tonyb
Posts: 69
Joined: Mar 2011

Man,
i gotta tell ya i know how you feel. I can't begin to tell ya how mentally tough
it was to make myself crawl up on that table and let them fasten that mask down everyday.
And i can't begin to tell you just how many times i had decided that i just couldn't make it through another day of that radiation. But bottom line... I just kept going in every day. My apointments were at 7a.m. so i got out of the bed at 6 and got straight into the shower. that would refresh me just enough to make it out to the car, and walk from the car into the treatment center. Then i would crawl back onto that table on more time...
Now i am 6 months post treatment. Life is starting to look pretty sweet again.
The nausia is a memory, the fatigue is about all gone, taste buds are getting better every day. Oh and my hair grew back, except the part that was already going away. lol
Here is the facts.
Treatment is tough, but you WILL be able to get thru it.
If the pain gets out of hand, talk to the people at the clinic.It doesn't mean that you are a wimp, it means you need more meds. They expect you to need serious pain meds.
but they don't know how much until you ask. They are waiting for you to tell them.
If constipation gets to you, let them know, they have meds for that.And Everyone needs them.
If the nausia is too much to endure, tell them , they have meds that will make it get tolerable. It may take a while to get them adjusted and working well though, but its worth it.
All the stuff that makes people want to give up, they can help you get through it.
The docs who deal with this stuff , see it every day and they know how to help.
But every day you have to make the choice to keep getting back on that table.
I did, and now i can honestly say to you that it was worth it.
If i had it to do over again, the thing i would change would be to add antidepressants to the mix. I genuinely believe that i needed them. Things might have been easier to cope with, But i wouldn't have believed it at the time. Something to consider.
Best wishes for you, Tonyb

Skiffin16's picture
Skiffin16
Posts: 8057
Joined: Sep 2009

Good advice......

My chemo MD always stressed, "No matter what you are going through, tell me, I have something for it...", and she always did...

Best,
John

Subscribe with RSS
About Cancer Society

The content on this site is for informational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider. Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition. Use of this online service is subject to the disclaimer and the terms and conditions.

Copyright 2000-2014 © Cancer Survivors Network