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TAKING VITAMINS/SUPPLEMENTS DURING CHEMO?????

maggie_wilson's picture
maggie_wilson
Posts: 616
Joined: Nov 2009

sisters,

i know the convention medical wisdom is to not take any vitamins, supplements, etc. (maybe some vit b) while doing chemo because it interferes with the efficacy of the chemo, and protects the cancer cells as well as healthy ones. so, my question: what about all the vitamins, herbs, etc. we take while we have cancer, when we're not in chemo--wouldn't those also protect/grow cancer cells as well??

i
haven't made a real search yet of vitiamins & chemo, wanted to check in here first and see if there are any divergent opinions amongst doctors in this big country of ours, and beyond. where's the data? where are the studies showing harm done by vitamins during chemo? anyone have any thoughts re: this, or information? after i do a little research myself, i'm going to contact commonweal that has access to medical sites we mere mortals do not, and ask them to do a little research on this.

sisterhood,
maggie

Susanna23
Posts: 66
Joined: Dec 2010

Hi Maggie
Oh this is an interesting one - been pondering this very subject myself! I have a stage 1a carcinosarcoma and was offered adjuvant chemo of carboplatin/taxol to prevent recurrence after surgery. I had the first round yesterday. I had been taking 2000 IU vitamin D3 but stopped it three days before. I asked the pharmacist about it (I'm in London, btw) and she said yes there were some antioxidant supplements they did not recommend during chemo but as far as she knew vit D3 was not one of them. I was going to restart it three days after but have decided to not take any supplements till all treatment is over - then resume. I think the reasoning is that the chemo may be eliminated as a toxin or that the oxidative damage that kills the cancer cells through chemo may be reduced by the presence of antioxidants.
I will rely on diet - pharmacist said no restrictions. Have become a big fan of the anticancer book by David Servan Schreiber. But to complicate things further, he has posted on his blog that turmeric has been shown to kill cancer stem cells but he thinks that too could interfere with chemo and to stop it before and after (3 days). Whatever next?!
Let us know if you find anything interesting! Bottom line for me - am a science journalist and believe it or not was even considering a book on antioxidants - is that aupplements act different from a healthy diet. They should be considered as medicines.
Best wishes
Susan

maggie_wilson's picture
maggie_wilson
Posts: 616
Joined: Nov 2009

i guess if even servan schreiber is recommending that we stop tumeric 3 days before infusion, and 3 days after, there may be something to not taking supplements, etc. during chemo. i will post any new information i get about this, since it's never quite made sense to me. what you said about the body eliminating chemo as a toxin (which of course it also is), thus making it less effective, does make sense. i will be talking to my medical oncologist next week, and will specifically ask her re: vit d, since i'm taking a mega dose once a week. also taking high doses of vit c, tumeric, etc. wonder if it's ok to eat tumeric, ginger, etc. while on chemo, rather than in supplement form?

sisterhood,
maggie

hopeful girl 1
Posts: 454
Joined: May 2010

I believe the American Cancer Society recommends that you get most of your vitamins from actual foods, fruits and veggies etc. They recommend that we eat less meat, and that meat be more of a side dish than the main event.

I talked to an oncologist nutritionist from the Wellness Center in my area, and she advised that the final word research is not out yet on D3. She said there is a lot of research going on about it. She is going to be sending me some nutrition info for eating post cancer treatments.

I read it is also important for uterine cancer patients to exercise 30 minutes almost everyday after treatment and eat 5 fruits and veggies each day and that the majority of us do not do this.

I'll admit I have not exercised in a couple of weeks.

Let's get to it ladies and do what we can for ourselves.

Hugs,
Cindy

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

I stopped most supplements except multi and B complex during chemo. My doc didn't object to any of them actually during chemo. But I'm back on them now postchemo. I think it is the large doses of antioxidants that they frown upon during chemo.

Ro10's picture
Ro10
Posts: 1392
Joined: Jan 2009

When I started chemo I was taking a Multivitamin Packet with 6 different vitamins, and 3 fish oil. The pharmacist at the cancer center recommended that I only take a multivitamin during chemo, as they do not have enough information on what the extra vitamins do with chemo. She did not recommend anything that was not endorsed by the FDA. Some of the supplements encourage cancer growth, she said. So I switched to just taking a multivitamin, and did not take the fish oil while on chemo. I resumed the fish oil after chemo. I have high cholesterol and that is part of the recommended treatment for me.

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

Friend of mine was RN in oncology dept. who coached me from beginning to end of my treatments. Avoid any antioxidants (mainly pill form not food) as they can interfere with chemo treatments. Okay to loadup on antioxidants after treatments. Suggested I take only a general multi vitamin, protein and Co enzyme Q10. If having issues with constipation from chemo, take Nature's Secret Ultimate Oil (stool softener) gel caps. Lastly the protein (powder Whey) 30 grams per day, as helps endurance, stamina and muscle and tissue repair.

In summary, many vitamins block the activity of chemo drugs, so best to stick with a very limited array. Did ask my oncologist and he basically told me, "there's no research on vitamins, therefore, use with your own discretion in limited quantities."

Note, vitamins aren't regulated by the FDA....be careful!!! Many claim to "cure" disease, that's hogwash~

culka's picture
culka
Posts: 158
Joined: Oct 2009

before surgery. They said immediately (like 13 days before), I did it 7 days and resume same day I came home. I had bag of vitamin mix with me in hospital.

Never had chemo, but during radiation I took herbs (all together 1.5lb) and tons of vitamins. Went trough with heads up and not so many side effects.
And how many servings of fruit and veggies they recommend? 5? I'm eating 13+.

HellieC
Posts: 432
Joined: Nov 2010

I was advised just to carry on taking a multivitamin during chemo but nothing else. I think the oncologists in the UK will only recommend "evidence based" treatments, so because vitamins, antioxidents etcs aren't tried and tested in clinical trials, they can't/won't recommend them.
So I have concentrated on healthy diet during chemo (lots of fruit, veggies etc., reducing meat, dairy etc).
But as soon as chemo is out of my system it will be full speed ahead with vitamins D3, C, B17 etc.
I am a very good girl (!) and follow my conventional medicine programme to the letter, but once it's over and there is no more treatment planned I want to wrap myself in supplements in the hope that I can beat this cancer for good!
I've read about the exercise too and as soon as I am strong enough, I intend to get out for a brisk walk for 30-60 minutes a day, regardless of the British weather !
Take care everyone
Helen

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

You're so inspirational, as been reading many of your posts. The supplements are fine as long as low dosages as I mentioned earlier on post. We want the chemo to work and not be blocked by the nutrients we're thinking will help. When I asked my doc about vitamins, he told me he doesn't have clinical trials since not followed by the FDA, so watch what I take.

I'm a huge exercise person and even during my chemo I was out walking. Now it wasn't full speed ahead, every day, but if I felt good I'd get on my shoes and hit the trails, knowing I had to not overdo. Now that I'm away from treatments I do workout extensively 6 days per week...and it feels so good!

Research on exercise is very impressive. I go to a place here in St Louis Called THE WELLNESS CENTER and they had a doc give a presentation on exercise and cancer. So much correlation between the two. Doc suggested 30 minutes-- 5 days per week. Now it doesn't have to be real intense and in fact, no real studies showing the "higher intensity" of exercise is of help. Even weight lifting is good, but mainly on the bone building side of cardio.

See you on the trails....
Jan

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

Tell me about this. Is this the equivalent of laetrile? or am I thinking of another B - 19 perhaps.

Can anyone tell me about the wisdom of taking rice milk. I just started this. tastes OK

Mary Ann

HellieC
Posts: 432
Joined: Nov 2010

Yes - B17 is the same as laetrile (also called amygdalin I think). It's quite a controvertial supplement, but I'm going to give it a go! We can't get it in the UK, so I have some tablets winging their way over from the US as we speak! I'm also going to be taking better apricot kernels as well, which also contain B17.

Kindest wishes
Helen

culka's picture
culka
Posts: 158
Joined: Oct 2009

hmm, because you need some kind of coffee whitener and milk is not good.

NoTimeForCancer
Posts: 430
Joined: Mar 2013

Like many on here, during chemo I took a multi vitamin, but I also took probiotics, D3, calcium and Occuvite.  My doctor never had a problem with that.  More importantly I met with a dietitian who specializes in helping cancer patients during my radiation treatment (which wasn't covered by insurance) and well worth the money!!

She told me it was controversial, but soy mimics estrogen, and with UPSC I don't need any form of hormones, so I should avoid processed soy (soy protein isolates).  Well, that is easier said then done, but it can be done.

Interestingly, last August 2012 or so, there was an article in Good Housekeeping on soy and its side effects.  In the 80's there was a study that showed Japanese women had a lower cancer rate and the conclusion was because they ate soy.  Then in the 90's they looked again and saw that the Japanese women didn't go overboard with soy and ate it in the pure forms, edamame, soy milk, tofu, not the highly processed stuff. 

Funny that when we are told "push the protein" they refer to Boost and Ensure, both which list soy protein isolates in the ingredient list.  I started to read the labels in the store and saw that Atkins shakes are whey based and I emailed them to ask if they were sticking with that recipe.  They said they took the soy out several years ago and didn't plan on putting it back. 

I don't work for Atkins, and I believe you should try to get your protein and vitamins from actual food, it tastes better, but when you need a "kick" it is nice to have something that won't hurt you. 

FYI - as for the probiotics, she showed me slides from a power point presentation of 400 cervical cancer patients who also receive radiation to their pelvis, 1/2 that got the probiotics and 1/2 that didn't and the results were overwhelming!  It was pretty graphic, but none of the women who got the probiotics hospitalized with dehydration from diarrhea.  I took them before my cancer and continue to take them today.

kansasgal's picture
kansasgal
Posts: 115
Joined: Aug 2009

Hi, Maggie!

During chemo (carbo/taxol) my gyn/onc recommended only a single "senior" multi vitamin/mineral supplement and extra protein through the foods I ate. He recommended staying away from any additional vitamin supplements during chemo. He even said to hold off on the green tea until I had completed chemo. I had been hoping for a magic bullet or at least a whole new diet plan! I didn't ask about turmeric, but I did start to sprinkle it on many of the foods I regularly eat. I'm eager to find out from you any recommendations Commonweal makes.

Hugs from Sally

maggie_wilson's picture
maggie_wilson
Posts: 616
Joined: Nov 2009

i'd look to see if the rice milk were made from white or brown rice. probably white, in which case, i'm not sure it's the best, since we're supposed to stay away from white flour, rice, etc. have ypu tried organic almond milk? it's quite good, and good for us.
sisterhood,
maggie

maggie_wilson's picture
maggie_wilson
Posts: 616
Joined: Nov 2009

good question for commonweal. they didn't address this question. since they're not doctors, they tend to shy away from giving medical advice per se. i have a routine visit with my medical oncologist next week and will ask her re: vit d3, multi vits, etc. i think i recall the nurse saying only some b vitamins, but we'll see. do want to be able to take something when chemo comes up again.

sisterhood,
maggie

Susanna23
Posts: 66
Joined: Dec 2010

In response to recent comments, so glad to hear of the benefits of exercise. I do a walk in the park (several circuits - try to get up to 10,000 pedometer steps) or a swim most days but I never feel as if I am exerting myself all that much. Also, the green tea - my chemo pharmacist did ask about this and now I'm wondering whether to back off it a bit! I was drinking a pot of Sencha loose green tea each afternoon - maybe that's too concentrated so I'm going to switch to the weaker teabags I think. I'd like to get my vitD levels tested when chemo is over but don't think I could get this on the NHS. Helen, very interesting about laetrile - I haven't heard of this for years but I think there was quite a lot of controversy. Do you have any recent information? A friend also suggested misteltoe....but we could go on and on! Let's keep sharing ideas, anyway. Hope you are all doing well.
Susan

HellieC
Posts: 432
Joined: Nov 2010

Here is a useful link to get information on B17:

http://www.worldwithoutcancer.org.uk

Also, if you just "Google" B17, you will find lots of information for and against!

Hope you find it interesting.
Helen xx

willbesurvivor's picture
willbesurvivor
Posts: 50
Joined: Jan 2011

Hi, does anyone know if this also applies to taking Chinese Herbs while having chemo?

Thanks

Tali

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

Yes applies to these....according to my nutritionist and RN oncol.

willbesurvivor's picture
willbesurvivor
Posts: 50
Joined: Jan 2011

Thanks for the info. Mum has made an appointment to see someone who deals with those herbs and chemo so I might let her know that before she goes and spends a lot of money on herbs that might actually hinder her recovery!

Tali

lociee's picture
lociee
Posts: 103
Joined: Apr 2009

I was told not to take any herbs during chemo because they could interfere with chemo effectiveness. A multi-vitamin was okay - but no herb-type supplements. Exercise is definitely good. The doctors encouraged it and I've read several very positive articles on exercise and cancer.
Good luck, Mia

Songflower's picture
Songflower
Posts: 632
Joined: Apr 2009

I read a clinical trial in process for a new drug (endometrial cancer patients were in it) and this drug takes folic acid out of your body and seems to slow cancer down as they believe folic acid speeds it up. I didn't mark the article; if you find the name of the drug please let us know I haven't had much time for searching info. I don't take supplements while getting chemo or after. More information is needed for me so I eat those delicious raspberries every morning.

Diane

realtimedyno
Posts: 5
Joined: Jun 2010

Physicians are absolutely lacking ANY training in nutrition and/or supplements. There is often a hostility toward this subject, and unless the FDA has "approved" something, they think it's snake oil. Against that backdrop, there are MANY studies showing various supplements to reduce the toxicity of chemo, increase time to progression, and other positive outcomes.
For example, the proscription against vitamin C was based on a rat study of ambiguous results...especially considering rats, along with many other animals, produce their own vitamin C. Rats, in particular, produce the equivalent of 10,000 mg. of vitamin C. (and the "suggested human dose is, what, 60 mg). Based on that, some big cheese in the oncology field recommended avoidiing vitamin C--even 100 mg., which is about what you'd get in a big tall glass of orange juice.
Medicine is absolutely "traditional", and anything they didn't learn in medical school, or from Big Pharm salespeople is suspect.

JoAnnDK
Posts: 276
Joined: Jun 2011

here is an article about folic acid

http://www.cancer.org/treatment/treatmentsandsideeffects/complementaryandalternativemedicine/herbsvitaminsandminerals/folic-acid

angela o
Posts: 2
Joined: Feb 2013

Hi Jan

Saw in a different post that u live in St Louis as well. I was wondering if you could recommend a nutritionist ? How are you doing, btw? I see this is 2 years old, this post.

Peace,

Angela O

NorahS
Posts: 93
Joined: Dec 2012

Had my last chemo cycle (Taxol/Carboplatin) on Thursday. In the next few weeks, will be selecting a Naturopathic Doctor (there are several in this Canadian city) - and one that is specially trained in cancer care - simply because I can use some guidance on this very confusing subject.

I have made my own stabs at eating 80% plant and 20% protein diet, stopped drinking coffee - except at Sunday breakfast; and don't have a clue with what supplements or vitamins I should start taking.  Which is why I decided to get some help from what I decided would be a qualified person.

For those unfamiliar with Naturopathic Medicine it is described as philosophy and practice of healthcare that is founded on holistic principles. It is a distinct system of healthcare that draws on both scientific knowledge and long-standing traditional wisdom.

Naturopathic Physicians study conventional medical sciences such as pathology and pharmacology but are also trained in a range of alternative modalities such as clinicial nutrition (dietary adjustments, nutritional supplements) ; botanical medicine (tinctures, teas); homeopathic medicine (substances to stimulate self-healing); acupuncture; physical medicine (exercise, massage, hydrotherapy); mind-body medicine (counselling, lifestyle counselling). 

Will share whatever I can here of course. 

TAyers's picture
TAyers
Posts: 43
Joined: Aug 2012

I will look forward to hearing what they tell you to do, I believe we have almost same diagnosis. Tami

Hybridspirits's picture
Hybridspirits
Posts: 149
Joined: Nov 2012

i am in the middle of chemo and have seen a naturopath that has extended training in oncology.  This is what she told me during chemo

don't go crazy during chemo as we are trying to look for microscopic cancer cells

she actually said you want to tease them if they exist to come out and get zappd.  Suggested I even add higher glycemic fruits and other items like honey on my cereal. items she said we will be discussing post chemo as a no no.

she didn't say go crazy and i too was going with the plant diet and trying to follow what I thought was good post cancer diagnosis.  She just said continue this and add some of the above

only supps she gave me were fish oil and l teramine - both were identified to help the type of chemo I was having do their thing.  Did learn what you get during chemo from an oncologist to supplement the chemo is realted to the drugs being used, so caution on following another naturopath's suggestion for another patient

 

she did say after treatment we will be doing immune system testing to see if something is lacking.  Another item shared was what would be good for me might not be good for another.   

 

i should have more information soon as I have a follow up next week to see our next step after Chemo

 

 

(I am in S. Windsor Ct if anyone needs the name of my Naturopath with oncoogy training.  There aren't many out there and they ususally have this specificially identified in their bio. I received the name of this Naturopath from the Naturopath I had seen before cancer diagnosis)

 

 

Kathy G.'s picture
Kathy G.
Posts: 116
Joined: Dec 2012

Ladies,

Although I have not had to go through chemo or radiation alot of the discussion about nutrition and supplements does not apply to me I am seeking to improve my diet after being diagnosed with Stage 1a/grade 1 uternine cancer.

I cannot afford a nutritionist and the more I read book-wise, doing research and on these boards the more confused I become about whether I am making the right changes. I read the above about avoiding green peppers and onions which have become one of my favorite meals grilled with tumeric and black pepper and wrapped in a soft wheat tortilla.

I have read and heard soy should be avoided, but some experts recommend it for recovering cancer patients.

I try to avoid sugar at all costs, but have found it disquised in almost every new food or drink I have learned to like...why are artificial sweetners diet teas?

If a plant based diet is recommended that why are peppers and onions not good for you?

I would really like to know if the majority of the ladies who have gone thru cancer just make moderate changes in diet or if true effort goes inot a more radical change like 80% plant based and 20% protein? I am now reading a book authored by Dean Ornish who talks about a link between animal protein and cancer.

I am just SO confused!

Kathy

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

I've seen a nutritionist and they have many differences in opinions from one to the other.  When I first started my treatments and discussed with my oncologist he only said, stick with the basics such as a multi vitamin and possibly calcium.  He did admit doesn't have the experience with these supplements and he'd suggest avoiding any high dosages ones.  One that many patients take, vit C via IV...I've not and wondering how this is during chemo?

More research out there on yes lots of plant based foods, but also the good animal proteins/fats.  When they speak of animal fats we  don't mean the "commercial" type products but the "grass cuts, but the "organic, grass fed, free-range, and pastured" type animal bi-products or meats.  Commercial animals are generalled loaded with hormones and antibiotics which we should avoid.  I as well am HR+ therefore must avoid any added hormones as to why stick with organic products and avoid the commerical types.  

Sugar yes is disguised in many products with the ending in listing "...ose", etc,.  To this day I'm not an avid ketchup person nor mayonnaise user.  Remember fruits have sugars which can raise our blood sugar levels which affect cancer diagnosis.  

Have you read the book "Anti-Cancer) by David Servan-Schreiber?  It's my new Bible as you'll find lots of great info.

Wonderful to see how this cancer scare for you (lucky gal it was stage 1) has even changed your way of eating and living your life.  Says a lot about you, as a person whom cares about herself and this little scare you'll use to take as a lesson learned and live your life more healthfully.

Don't think green peppers are bad, they need to be "organic".  Have you seen the DIRTY DOZEN list with the fruits and veggies which must be organic, as loaded with more pesticides vs ones which aren't as necessary.  Onions?  Well I've heard mostly good about them and then every once in a while mention about them not as good...who knows?  

I've learned an awful lot from others on this board, plus just lots of reading on internt sites and books at library or purchased.  The best way to explain our way of eating -- go with natural products and avoid all artificial ingredients and junk foods.  If consuming fruits/veggies follow the DIRTY DOZEN list, and with meats/dairy go with organic, grass-fed and pastured products.  With fish, try for the wild fishes such as salmon which is loaded with omega 3.  

Hope this helps as bit as know over the last few years there has been tons of topics on our site about eating and taking care of our bodies after a cancer diagnosis.  Try searching for some of these topics and bet you'll find lots of good info.

As well, feel free to email me personally and happy to give you more specifics.

Hugs,

Jan

johannel
Posts: 4
Joined: Apr 2013

Hi Maggie,

 

I am not a doctor, however if you not allowed to take vitamins, you not allowed to eat... Smile  However there are concerns (by some nutritional experts) related to Vit B due to its detox qualities that will nutrilise the effect of the chemo, as well as iron.  However, research have shown that carotonoid rich food (dark red and purple oily pigments), flavonoids (red pigment in grapes and berries) and cruciferous vegetables (dark green pigments) can reduce growth and protect against against cancers.

One of my concerns is that western medical science are not "trained" in nutritional benefits, it treats from a symptom perspective, and not the cause.  All our chronic diseases are diet related, heart, cardiovascular, cancer, diabetes, obesity.  Thus we can take steps in reducing our risk.  Problem however is that due to our agricultural practises the nutrient content of our food base is declining in favour of looking good and shelf life.  The only alternative is to take good quality nutritional supplements.

 

You welcome to contact me in private if you want to discuss further.

 

Regards,

 

Johan

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

I'd be interested in the company you're a distribututor rep for as I was involved in one for a few years.  Not today, as it just wasn't a good setup for any type of income, but that's just my take,

Do agree about the western medicine --- docs not trained or schooled in nutritional benefits, and more about symptom perspective, then treatment.  That's been going on for a zillion years, and it's more about we as an individual realizing this and coming forth to learn on our own about how to treat our body.  I for one avoid any type of meds, and outside of chemo drugs, never been on any type meds for any extended period of time (yes consider myself lucky).  I live with the belief our bodies can heal ourselves, but am realistic that at times the meds are necessary.  

Agricultural practices are truly changing our food base and we're more about fast and easy eating vs. what's the most natural and nutritional to keep us healthy.  I tend to not agree that the ONLY ALTERNATIVE is take quality nutritional supplements to help our bad agricultural practices.  I'm to believe if we get away from the COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS which are what you call the BAD AGRICULTURAL products, and go with the organic, grass-fed, pastured raised animals products this will help.  From my past experience if we continue to consume the regular COMMERCIAL products and simply feel a nutritional supplement pill or powder will suffice, that doesn't always work in our favor.  Remember those supplement pills must be absorbed into our bodies, otherwise, they're never ingested, simply end up in our sewage system.  Wasted!

As you mentioned the great foods such as carotonoid rich, flavonoids, cruiciferous vegetables are wonderful and I consume them almost every day.  I've over the past few years gotten away from reliance on pill supplements and gone with more good quality foods from non-commercial animals or non-pesticides fruits/veggies.  Don't get me wrong I still take supplements, but gotten away from the zillion I used years ago.  

You bring a lot of great insight here and just wanted to throw out my thoughts.  Are you a cancer patient or family member of a cancer patient?

Thanks again for your information.

Jan 

 

er

johannel
Posts: 4
Joined: Apr 2013

I agree 100% with your statements.  When I said ONLY ALTERNATIVE is to supplement I was referring to more general worldwide.  Not everybody lives in the first world where organic produce are available, even in South Africa it is available, but not as readily outside the bigger cities.

To answer your question:

No I am not a cancer patient, however my grandmom (breast cancer), mother (abdominal) and father (prostate) were all diagnosed with cancer.  Also some heart disease, diabetic and blood pressure issues in family and a sister who is allergic to preservatives (sodium benzoate).  I was therefore from an early age aware of reading labels on the products you buy and the "poison" we made to eat.

 

Regards and thank you very much for your feedback.

 

Johan

Kathy G.'s picture
Kathy G.
Posts: 116
Joined: Dec 2012

Jan,

Sorry it has taken so long for me to get back to your response, but my newer laptop crashed and trying to post on my dinosaur took forever.

I did want to thank you for your support and information on the topic of nutrition...again...lol. I did read The Anti-Cancer book while I was out on medical leave, but it was tons of information and I have not processed it all. I think my problem is that I have never really dieted or really made an effort to change my eating habits my entire life resulting in me ballooning up to well over 200 pounds after I had my children andas I got older. I was pretty healthy and active until a few years ago when I really began to feel the weight was a hindrance, and I was diagnosed with borderline HBP.

Consequently, I know very little about basic nutrition that many women learn in their teens!I never drank diet beverages so I am shocked at all the artificial sweetners and other junk they have in them. I thought it was pure tea I was drinking! Silly me! I also thought if I cut out fat by reducing fat grams I was doing good, but then it seems they make up for the loss of fat by adding sugar. I do enjoy fresh fruit more than vegtables, but like you mention there is the problem of sugar there.

I feel like I am being chased down by SUGAR!!!

Anyhow, I need to go back and highlight in the Anti-Cancer book and continue to build a 'safe' list of menus and snacks.

Two of my daughters lived and worked at the Omega Institute in New York and have told me it takes years to learn about a healthy vegan diet which is the direction I want to get in, but it is going to take time!

So thank you for all you shared with me and all that you post on other subjects to help me and other ladies on this site.

Good thoughts to you!

Kathy

 

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