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moscelleration

RedHead1
Posts: 1
Joined: Oct 2013

Has anyone heard about moscelleration

 

 

NoTimeForCancer's picture
NoTimeForCancer
Posts: 578
Joined: Mar 2013

A morcellator is a surgical instrument used for division ("morcellation") and removal of large masses of tissues during laparoscopic surgery. It can consist of a hollow cylinder that penetrates the abdominal wall, ending with sharp edges or cutting jaws, through which a grasper can be inserted to pull the mass into the cylinder to cut out an extractable piece.

Morcellation devices in surgery

 

Laparoscopic morcellation is commonly used at surgery to remove bulky specimens from the abdomen using minimally invasive techniques. Historically, morcellation was performed using a device that required the surgeon or assistant to manually 'squeeze' the handle. Other reports describe using a scalpel directly through the abdomen to create small specimens that can be drawn out of the abdominal cavity. In 1993, the first electric morcellator was introduced in the US market. It was initially used for uterine extraction, but later applied to other organs. The use of morcellators at surgery has now become commonplace, with at least 5 devices currently on the US market. Despite decades of experience, there remains limited understanding of the short-term and long-term sequelae of morcellation. Concerns have been raised about injury to surrounding organs including bowel, bladder, ureters, pancreas, spleen and major vascular structures. Long-term issues may include parasitic growth of retained tissue with the potential to cause adhesions, bowel dysfunction and potentially disseminate unrecognized cancer.

 

Concerns of morcellation devices in gynecologic surgery

 

Morcellation is associated with spreading of cellular material of the morcellated tissue. In gynecologic surgery for benign pathologies there is an approximately a 0.09% risk of an unexpected leiomyosarcoma. After morcellation 64% of such cases may develop disseminated disease which is of particular concern because of the considerable mortality of leiomyosarcoma.

txtrisha55's picture
txtrisha55
Posts: 432
Joined: Apr 2011

Well, that sounds really gross. As I was reading out loud, my daughter told me to stop and she left the room.  I bet I have that tool or something like it tomorrow morning when I have surgery to remove my gallbladder then they are going to fix my hernias from my hysterectomy from two years ago.

 

I will be out of pocket for a while till I recover. I am taking 2weeks of work then I will return to work. Wishing everyone the best. Trish

Ro10's picture
Ro10
Posts: 1483
Joined: Jan 2009

Good luck with your surgery tomorrow.  I hope all goes well.  I am sure they will not use that instrument.  Hope you have a quick recovery.  

txtrisha55's picture
txtrisha55
Posts: 432
Joined: Apr 2011

Thanks but to remove my gallbladder they are doing it ?? laparoscopy once that is removed they will start working on the hernias, yes as in more than one. The hernias are below the belly button, that is the biggest one, the a tiny one next to the belly button and two above the belly button. The dr said about a 3-4 hour surgery. It is also day surgery so I will go home after. So when fo you leave on your trip,? I did not thank you for donating for the buxz off, I am sure the kids cancer fund appreciates it. Rhanks for the kind thoughts. Trish

Kaleena's picture
Kaleena
Posts: 1226
Joined: Nov 2009

Thinking of you, Trish.

It will be good to have those hernias taken care of!    I finally had my large hernia done 4 years after my hysterectomy.    It felt good to finally have it done!  It felt like a tummy tuck!  lol.   My best to you.   Get some rest and a quick recovery!

Kathy

ConnieSW's picture
ConnieSW
Posts: 623
Joined: Jun 2012

what brought that up?  It does sound gross.  I thought I heard the soundtrack from JAWS while I was reading the description.

 

Trish,  good luck with the surgery.  I wish you an uneventful recovery.  Take it easy.

Abbycat2's picture
Abbycat2
Posts: 158
Joined: Feb 2014

Trisha, you've had your surgery and I hope all went well and that you are on your way to recovery!

Cathy

Kaleena's picture
Kaleena
Posts: 1226
Joined: Nov 2009

I just had a CT guided biopsy last Tuesday and that sounds like something that they did!   When they took the sample, it kind of felt like a staple gun - you felt the kick, the bite and pull.   I felt three kicks but my report only indicated two samples???

Ugg.  My insides hurt after reading this!   lol

 

 LOL@ Connie for JAWS music

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