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Got my stage and grade

StrongerthanIthought
Posts: 23
Joined: Feb 2014

Went for my post- hysterectomy consult.  Pathology showed cancer in lymph node.  I'm stage IIIC  grade II  Didn't even think to ask what all that means. Just heard stage III and knew it wasn't good.

Will have chemo and radiation (external & internal). I'm really scared. Don't think this is sounding very good. Could really use some encouraging words.  

Also, when I went for the chemo consult yesterday - she saw some "hardening" that concerned her. So I have a chest CT scan set for Monday.

I'll be getting a port for chemo (assuming it is still a go after CT results).

Any help out there to get me thru - will be greatly appreciated,    Barb

Ro10's picture
Ro10
Posts: 1482
Joined: Jan 2009

Sorry your stage is 3-C.  I too was diagnosed with 3-C.  I had the sandwich treatment initially. I am glad you are going to have a port inserted.  It will definitely help with blood draws, chemo treatments and scans.   Naturally you are scared.  The unknown is very scary.  I know I was very scared not knowing how I would react to the chemo.  I feared lots of nausea, but that did not happen because they have so many different meds they give you pre- chemo and after chemo.  I had a chemo treatment every 3 weeks .

The radiation is more embarrassing than anything else.  After the initial consult it which takes about an hour, the actual treatment is only less than 10 minutes.  But you do go Monday thru Friday for the treatments.  I had 28 external treatments.  Then I had to go into the hospital for a 28 hour internal treatment.  

It seems very overwhelming at the beginning, but it is all doable.  Take it one day at a time.

I am not sure what your " hardening is", I hope you get good results from your CT of the chest.  Come back with any questions you may have.  in peace and caring.

soul-mate's picture
soul-mate
Posts: 69
Joined: Feb 2014

Stay positive in your thoughts!! We started our journey Aug. 2013 stage 4b and still forging ahead despite setbacks . You have a great circle of friends on CSN . Lot's of people with a wealth of experience to share . Stay away from miracle fixes,lot's of predators trying to take advantage when people are feeling down and under. Best wishes on your journey .

soul-mate

Shell bug's picture
Shell bug
Posts: 68
Joined: Nov 2011

Hi Barb,

I haven't posted in quite some time, but your post has compelled me to do so. I remember those frightening days of all of the unknowns.

I was diagnosed in Oct. of 2011 with stage 2 grade 3 endrometrioid cancer. Two lymph nodes glowed on a PET scan, so maybe I was stage 3c. At any rate, I had the treatment that you have described. I had many complications. I don't say that to scare you, but to reassure you that I am doing very well now. It is highly unlikely that your treatment will be as troubling as mine so please know that you will be able to do this. It won't be easy, obviously, but you will find a way to cope. Some things that helped me tremendously were: my coworkers cooked for me three times per week, I was able to pay for a housekeeper two times per month because my friends were so generous. I also worked a lot, as much as possible because I didn't want to use other people's leave if I didn't have to.

I was 38 with two young boys, so I just did what I had to do to give myself the best chances possible. I focused on what was most critical in my life. I tried to give my boys as many good memories as possible, just in case. Luckily, thankfully,  I have not had any recurrences yet even though I had just about every negative prognostic variable out there.

Just be true to yourself and let people help you.

Goodluck, and if you have any more questions please ask!

Rachelle

 

 

StrongerthanIthought
Posts: 23
Joined: Feb 2014

Thanks to all of you for the support and encouraging words.  I'm so glad a friend told me about this site.   People who have "been there, done that, bought the T-shirt" can REALLY understand.   I'm sure I'll have a lot of questions - right now even thinking about it is sometimes overwhelming.     Barb

TAyers's picture
TAyers
Posts: 48
Joined: Aug 2012

Hi Barb,

I too was grade 3 stage 3c, it's very scarey, but I ditto everything Ro said. You feel so alone and it's good to know there are others out there too. Message me anytime. I will be 2 years out in May when I was  diagnosed. I was 45 years old. Take it one day at a time and remember your a statistic of one. Tami

Dee5678
Posts: 37
Joined: Feb 2014

I'm starting my first chemo soon, so I relate to your fears.  The unknown is hard.  I'm anxious to get this first treatment behind me so I know more about what to expect. I'm told that the first treatment is a long day. Bring things that make you comfortable as well as lunch or snacks. Keep posting. We will all support you.  

NoTimeForCancer's picture
NoTimeForCancer
Posts: 577
Joined: Mar 2013

Yep, I would say the first one is the worst because you have nothing to compare it to.  I also took notes in a pad on all the chemo nurses names, how treatments made me feel, what worked so I knew what to do the next time.  For me, I did not have a port, and when they flushed my line to make sure it was still good between chemicals, if they did it quickly it burned.  We found that pushing it slowly during the check didn't burn.

I don't tell you that to scare you, just what happened to me.  You really will do ok.  The "unknown" is always the scariest and since this was the first time with cancer for many of us it was deffinitely the unknown.

Take a breath. 

sunflash's picture
sunflash
Posts: 158
Joined: Aug 2011

Good luck to both of you, Barb and Dee. I remember being petrified about my first chemo, but my imagination was far worse than the actual experience. I suffered relatively few side effects (hair loss, fatigue, bone aches) which seems like a lot but you recover from them  in a fairly short time.  You probably won't have much nausea as long as you take the meds prescribed for it.

I wrote all my chemos on the calendar and marked them off, one by one. This gives you a feeling of accomplishment and creates a strong visual that the end of treatment is in sight.

We're all here for you!

soul-mate's picture
soul-mate
Posts: 69
Joined: Feb 2014

BARB & DEE I HOPE ALL GOES WELL IN CHEMO, MY WIFE HAS DONE 5 TREATMENTS OF CARBO-TAXOL AND 2 RADIATION TREATMENTS WITH NOT TOO MANY ISSUES. I'M WRITING TO FOREWARN YOU OF POSSIBLE PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY FROM CHEMO. MAKE SURE TO TELL YOUR DR. IF HANDS AND FEET GET NUMB & TINGLING . THEY HAD TO STOP CARBO-TAXOL TREATMENTS ONCE NEUROPATHY SETS IN TO A CERTAIN LEVEL. SHE HAS SINCE SWITCHED TO GEMCITETABINE ( GEMZAR ) AND HAD 2 TREATMENTS SO FAR,AND CONTINUING ON OUR JOURNEY. SEARCH (NEUROPATHY ) AND GET THE HEADS UP.THIS WAS EXPLAINED TO AS A POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECT AND EVERY BODY REACTS DIFFERENTLY TO CHEMO. BYE FOR NOW.

SOUL-MATE

Jeannemae
Posts: 2
Joined: Sep 2013

Soulmate, I am not Jeannemae, she is my wife of 48 years, married when we were 19 and in college. Jeanne was diagnosed as stage III-2c uterine cancer after she had breakthrough bleeding and began the many trips to various doctors. At any rate, robotic hysterectomy, followed by the final diagnosis, then six Carbo/Taxil treatments. After visiting her oncologist she was told she was cancer free. The next day we were told that he radiologist found some suspicious spots. After further Evans found that spots near aorta were unexplained spots, non cancerous and that the spot in her hip was treated cancer cells, what ever that means. At any rate, she is in a two session chemo with stuff that makes Carbo/Taxil seem like a minor inconvenience. much harder than carbol/Taxil but we survived the first one and, after a week in Florida for a wedding and visiting old friends, we come back for her last chemo and then the three internal radiological treatments. Jeannemae is a skier, biker, hiker and yoga instructor. My perfect person to be with her. my question for you: how did you do it? How does one see the half fullness of the glass rather than the emptiness that I feel? We moved to another state shortly before diagnosis so our friends are 1800 miles away. Our son and his family live within walking distance but we don't want to lay too much on a family that has a 3 and 6 year old girls. I am at her side nearly constantly except for her woman's support group and while every day is a gift, the overwhelming sadness is a major burden. Did you experience this and, if so, how did you do it? Good luck and thanks for being there.

soul-mate's picture
soul-mate
Posts: 69
Joined: Feb 2014

I wish you both the best and I feel we are on the same journey.I tried to answer but my tablet froze twice as I was just about done. I will try later today and feel free to contact me through csn mail. Take care for now.

SOUL-MATE

soul-mate's picture
soul-mate
Posts: 69
Joined: Feb 2014

I feel so much for the both of you and wish nothing but the best on this journey. To answer "How I did It", I would have to write a book as there's so many things that come into the picture.First and foremost stay away from the word WHY as you will never have an answer. When our son passed , this was one thing that helped us cope. To add to this, search  " The 10 Elements of a soulmate " by Dr. Carmen Harra. Look at #6 & # 9 as this was most relevant to us.You have to stay positive to keep the glass half full to be there for the love of your life. I tell you it's not as easy as many think. Use this wonderful site to express your thoughts and feelings and don't keep it inside. Stay in touch and take care.

SOUL-MATE

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