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Adeno carcinoma anal cancer

jbug2
Posts: 47
Joined: Mar 2013

Can anyone explain Adenocarcinoma AC?  Does adenocarcinoma always require the surgery for the clostomy bag?  My brother had about 6 weeks of combined chemo/rad Monday thru Friday.  That ended, he gets a few months of a break, then he has surgery for the clostomy bag in July.  Then, it's more chemo for 2 days a week for 8 more weeks.  Where does Adenocarcinoma come from, what is the bag necessary.  My brother pastes a smile on his face and sort of pretends things are normal, although I know all of this breaks his heart.  My own Squamous Cell AC treatment seems what most of us had, chemo 1st week and week 4, radiation straight thru for 6 weeks.  I'm trying to move closer to my brother, but I'm kind of afraid to use his cancer team for my squamous cell ac checkups.  Frown

mp327's picture
mp327
Posts: 3043
Joined: Jan 2010

I have been in contact with a person who was diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the anus and she underwent APR with permanent colostomy.  This seems to be the standard treatment, along with chemo and radiation.  It's my understanding that this type of cancer is not in the anal canal, but is found in the glands around the anal canal that produce mucous.  I'm not sure why chemo/rad alone does not seem to be adequate treatment.  I tried to find some info by Googling, but didn't find much.  I will keep looking.  If I come across anything, I'll post the link.  

jbug2
Posts: 47
Joined: Mar 2013

What is APR?  My own medical oncologist told me the surgery with permanent colostomy is the standard for adenocarcinoma anal cancer. 

jcruz
Posts: 260
Joined: Jan 2013

An abdominoperineal resection, formally known as abdominoperineal resection of the rectum and abdominoperineal excision of the rectum or simply abdominoperineal excision, is a surgery for rectal cancer or anal cancer. It is frequently abbreviated as AP resection and APR.

That's from wikipedia.

jcruz
Posts: 260
Joined: Jan 2013

It looks like adenocarcinomas are treated like rectal carcinomas.

 

This is a quote from the American Cancer Society pages on anal cancer:

under What is anal cancer?

http://www.cancer.org/cancer/analcancer/detailedguide/anal-cancer-what-is-anal-cancer

 

Adenocarcinomas: A small number of anal cancers are known as adenocarcinomas. These can develop in cells that line the upper part of the anus near the rectum, or in glands located under the anal mucosa that release their secretions into the anal canal. These anal adenocarcinomas, are treated the same way as rectal carcinomas. For more information, see our document, Colorectal Cancer.

 

 

This must be a really rough time for your family. I am so sorry.

I have a sibling who has had a colostomy for nearly 20 years. He says obviously it's not what he'd wish for but having it is way better than living with the ulcerative condition he had before.

 



jbug2
Posts: 47
Joined: Mar 2013

Yes, it is a tough time for the family.  My brother and I pretend things are alright, my overly anxious 73 year old mom isn't easily fooled.  Our mom is in a nursing home and doesn't comprehend things correctly.  I went thru my anal cancer treatment for squam cell anal cancer ending January, at the same time, got my brother checking his symptoms that lead to this diagnosis of adeno carcinoma anal cancer.  I had hopes once he got through the 6 wks of chemo and rad (both Mon thru Fri) that would would enough, but no, my little brother is now facing surgery in July for the clostomy bag and MORE chemo after the surgery.  I'm moving close to him, but is doctors frighten me, since I'll be doing checks for anal cancer also.  Instead of getting better from my own squam cell cancer, its continued into a fight for my little brother's life.

jbug2
Posts: 47
Joined: Mar 2013

Yes, it is a tough time for the family.  My brother and I pretend things are alright, my overly anxious 73 year old mom isn't easily fooled.  Our mom is in a nursing home and doesn't comprehend things correctly.  I went thru my anal cancer treatment for squam cell anal cancer ending January, at the same time, got my brother checking his symptoms that lead to this diagnosis of adeno carcinoma anal cancer.  I had hopes once he got through the 6 wks of chemo and rad (both Mon thru Fri) that would would enough, but no, my little brother is now facing surgery in July for the clostomy bag and MORE chemo after the surgery.  I'm moving close to him, but is doctors frighten me, since I'll be doing checks for anal cancer also.  Instead of getting better from my own squam cell cancer, its continued into a fight for my little brother's life.

Marynb
Posts: 1134
Joined: Aug 2012

I am so sorry your family is going through this. I hope you and your brother recover quickly and are cancer free for many years to come. Prayers going out to you and your brother.

ccfighter
Posts: 395
Joined: Jan 2012

I'm over here from gyn boards but wanted to throw my two cents in on the adeno subject.  HPV can cause cancer in the cells of squamous or the glandular adenocarcinoma.  I have adenosquamous carcinoma of the cervix, a rare form of cervical cancer but none the less, hpv associated cervical cancer.  Most anal cancers are also hpv related.  The probable reason for the more drastic surgical approach is because theadenocarcinomas tend to behave more aggressively than the squamous, and are more resistant to chemo and radiation.  They require a more aggressive treatment plan to eliminate and control.  I had a radical hysterectomy, chemo, chemo/rads and more chemo and still had a recurrence in the lung two months after completing treatment.  I was originally staged at 2a.  Had more surgery and chemo and am now NED.  I would support the surgery to remove the cancer.  We are strong and we adapt.  I am 34 with three kids under the age of10 and will do whatever I have to to stick around for them.  Good luck to you and your brother.  I will be thinking of you and hoping for the best.  Hugs.

mp327's picture
mp327
Posts: 3043
Joined: Jan 2010

Thanks for your input on this!  While I was aware that surgery was usually the option for adenocarcinoma of the anus, I couldn't seem to find out why.  Your info has clarified this--thanks!

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