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Recent diagnosis of DCIS Grade 3 with microinvasion -

lld3311
Posts: 1
Joined: Apr 2013

I have been recently diagnosed with DCIS with 1mm microinvasion - Grade 3.  I am undergoing a double mastectomy with immediate reconstruction on Tuesday of next week.  I am curious to hear from others with same diagnosis - on how things went for them.  I will be having a sentinel lymphnode resection during surgery.  

MsGebby's picture
MsGebby
Posts: 659
Joined: Oct 2011

help you with this.  My diagnosis was much different.  I did want to offer my support and let you know you are not alone in this journey.

Keep us posted.  

Prayers sent for a successful surgery and easy recovery.

 

xoxo

Mary

jnl's picture
jnl
Posts: 3873
Joined: May 2009

I didn't have this either, but, wanted to say hello to you and to wish you good luck.  I pray your surgery will be a success and that you will have a fast recovery.

Hugs, Leeza

McMarty's picture
McMarty
Posts: 193
Joined: Nov 2012

That's about what I was diagnosed with and I did the immediate reconstruction too (only on one side)  I think you'll be really happy with that decision, I know I was.  The recovery was not too bad.  Mostly getting over the groggy, tired feeling from the anesthesia took a long time and nobody likes the drains but they are WAY better than not having drains!

I'm sure you'll do really well and we are always here to talk to!  Glad you found this group!  You'll meet a lot of caring, helpful people on here.

Please keep us posted on how you are doing!

Marty

disneyfan2008
Posts: 5306
Joined: Oct 2010

I had DCIS but no clue of #s etc...I had a lumpectomy and 8 wks radation. Finishing my 5th year of tamoxifen.

 

Just sending you good thoughts and pixie dust.

 

Denise

SWFLWriter
Posts: 1
Joined: Apr 2013

I had this exact diagnosis DCIS with microinvasion, as did two friends of mine.  We all had an excision and then radiation. Mine in 2008 and the two friends in 2009. We were all in our early 50s. You should be fine but I'm wondering why the double mastectomy? Is the DCIS in both breasts? Are you really young or do you have the BRCA mutation? How big is the DCIS? Did you get a second opinion? This is a really big surgery and there is no turning back once it's done. Also, you know that DCIS is not life threatening, right? Scary yes, but it's not going to kill you. In some cases it won't even become invasive cancer. Why not do the sentinel node biopsy and a lumpectomy and then make a decision about a mastectomy based on those results? I know you may have made up your mind already but I'm really curious why you are taking this course of action.

cinnamonsmile
Posts: 1049
Joined: Dec 2010

DCIS w/microinvasion means that there is an invasive component, so it is no longer pure DCIS and contained in the milk ducts and is considered Stage 1A. 

Alexis F's picture
Alexis F
Posts: 3604
Joined: May 2009

Wishing you the best of luck today with your surgery. 

Hugs, Lex

cinnamonsmile
Posts: 1049
Joined: Dec 2010

DCIS w/microinvasion IS invasive. There is DCIS that is still in the milk ducts AND the invasive portion (called the microinvasion). The microinvasion makes it DCIS AND Stage 1a.

JJDS
Posts: 259
Joined: Apr 2013

I was diagnosed with infiltrating ductal carcinoma and ductal carcinoma in situ and had a lumpectomy with radiation treatments.  Was a mastectomy the recommendation of your breast surgeon and oncologist?  I hope that with whatever you choose to do, that it is successful and that you have a lifetime of clear test results.

 

jennifer101
Posts: 26
Joined: Oct 2012

I too had the same diagnosis with a minor difference -- mine did not have microinvasion.  However like you I was high grade - comedo type aggressive cells that were multiplying rapidly.  My onco surgeon suggested lumpectomy followed by radiation and then five years of tamoxifen.  She also oredered an MRI to see what the mammogeam and biopsies might have missed as I had very dense breasts.

I then dove into intense research mode both online and contacting otheres who had had breast cancer.  What I discovered was that there are many possible side effect to both radiation and tamoxifen.  Also friends who had had a lumpectomy, eventually had to return for a mastectomy.

My mind was made up and at the next visit with surgeon I told her that I wanted a double skin sparing mastectomy and immediate reconstruction.  (My BC was two sites on the right side). She looked at me and said that I was a good candidate for that type of surgery and that she would do the same if in my position.

Everyone I spoke to afterwards was most supportive of my decision and especially my family.  I have not regretted it. I had the sentinel node biopsy that was negative.

Recovery was difficult as I live alone an have two big dogs, but I had a family member fly in to stay for the first 10 days and a lot of dear friends stopping by.  My reconstruction had to be revised a month later (the sling did not hold on the right side).  The biggest limitations are that I cannot lift anything heavier than 10 lbs for six months -- no walking dogs that pull -- and that my activities are restricted -- cannot do a lot of weight bearing yoga poses, no paddling etc.  However, a small price to pay for getting rid of the cancer.

Good luck to you and keep us posted.  Feel free to contact me directly as well.

Much love,

Jen

 

DianeBC's picture
DianeBC
Posts: 3888
Joined: Jun 2009

Hoping your surgery was successful and that you have a fast recovery. 

Hugs, Diane

jennifer101
Posts: 26
Joined: Oct 2012

I too had the same diagnosis with a minor difference -- mine did not have microinvasion.  However like you I was high grade - comedo type aggressive cells that were multiplying rapidly.  My onco surgeon suggested lumpectomy followed by radiation and then five years of tamoxifen.  She also oredered an MRI to see what the mammogeam and biopsies might have missed as I had very dense breasts.

I then dove into intense research mode both online and contacting otheres who had had breast cancer.  What I discovered was that there are many possible side effect to both radiation and tamoxifen.  Also friends who had had a lumpectomy, eventually had to return for a mastectomy.

My mind was made up and at the next visit with surgeon I told her that I wanted a double skin sparing mastectomy and immediate reconstruction.  (My BC was two sites on the right side). She looked at me and said that I was a good candidate for that type of surgery and that she would do the same if in my position.

Everyone I spoke to afterwards was most supportive of my decision and especially my family.  I have not regretted it. I had the sentinel node biopsy that was negative.

Recovery was difficult as I live alone an have two big dogs, but I had a family member fly in to stay for the first 10 days and a lot of dear friends stopping by.  My reconstruction had to be revised a month later (the sling did not hold on the right side).  The biggest limitations are that I cannot lift anything heavier than 10 lbs for six months -- no walking dogs that pull -- and that my activities are restricted -- cannot do a lot of weight bearing yoga poses, no paddling etc.  However, a small price to pay for getting rid of the cancer.

Good luck to you and keep us posted.  Feel free to contact me directly as well.

Much love,

Jen

 

VickiSam's picture
VickiSam
Posts: 8229
Joined: Aug 2009

DCIS - invasive,  Her2 positive - 2 sites of breast cancer in 1 breast.

18 weeks of consecutive chemo therapy -- ending on December 18, 2009 - dose dense chemo treatment plan .. I made it ... crawling to the finish line :)

1 year of Herceptin -- ending August 20, 2010
Lumpectomy -- 8-10-09
Breast Cancer diagnosis 8-14-09
Bilateral Mastectomy January 12, 2010

take pain medication when necessary. Multiple pillows in various, sizes help with sleeping on your back.

Please have cups, saucers, plates at arm level - as well as re-arranging your fridge for more commonly used items at arm levels. Tide/Downy small container sizes - also at arm level. Reaching up and grabbing heavy items -- will tear your stitches, as well as hurt your arms. Muscles and tissue in breast, as well as arm areas will be cut,moved and sewn back together.

I tried to take a bath ..but hence could not pull myself out of the our spa tub, no muscles or strength in my arms after bilateral mastectomy.. It took my husband, and daughter some time to pull me out of the tub == without hurting me. Not a pretty time, or sight to say the least. So I opted to shower ...My husband removed our shower head, and replaced it with a flex hose type so I could shower maneuvering the flex hose from waist down, as well as place shower water under my arms.

Lastly, please make sure you do your exercises as prescribed by Plastic Surgeon, and Physical Therapist.

Strength, Courage, Hope and Speedy recovery.

Vicki Sam

 

Megan M's picture
Megan M
Posts: 3001
Joined: Dec 2009

Thinking of you and hoping you are resting now and that you heal fast.  Check in with us when you're feeling like it so we know how you are.

Hugs, Megan

a_childs_prayer
Posts: 1
Joined: Apr 2013

I am recently diagnosed and have not been able to read all info that I should.  I guess I just cannot believe it.  I am trying now to learn more.  Your's sounds similary to mine although I don't know what a sentinel lymphnode resection is.  I have a high family history and thinking a double might be best for me.  I am wanting a different doctor but is it too late to ask?  You  all sound so brave and I am so confused. 

 

jennifer101
Posts: 26
Joined: Oct 2012

This is my understanding of it:

After doing the mastectomy, the surgeon looks at the lymph node closest to the breast (they inject an imaging dye before hand to find it).  They remove the node and send to pathology to look for presence of cancerous cells. If none are found, the surgeon ends there.  If there are cancer cells present, they keep going down the chain to see how far it has spread.

Please continue to do research, ask questions and yes, go to a second doctor if you are not comfortable with the one you have now.  I would look for a surgeon that specializes in mastectomies and not a general surgeon.

I had a similar scenario (see my post above) and I am so happy I wnet with the double mastectomy.

Take Care,

Jen

Megan M's picture
Megan M
Posts: 3001
Joined: Dec 2009

How did surgery go?  I hope you are feeling well enough and strong enough soon to let us know.

Hugs, Megan

Josie21
Posts: 338
Joined: Nov 2012

I hope your surgery went good today.  Hope to hear from you soon.

Hugs coming your way,

Ginny

Megan M's picture
Megan M
Posts: 3001
Joined: Dec 2009

Just looking for an update on  your surgery.  Thinking of you!

DebbyM's picture
DebbyM
Posts: 3294
Joined: Oct 2009

Praying that your surgery was successful and that you are healing and recovering at home by now.

Hugs, Debby

Pink Rose
Posts: 495
Joined: Nov 2012

Hoping you're doing alright. 

Thinking of you,

Rose

Megan M's picture
Megan M
Posts: 3001
Joined: Dec 2009

Checking on you to see if you might have posted an update.  Hoping you're healing fast and feeling good.

 

Angie2U's picture
Angie2U
Posts: 2993
Joined: Sep 2009

How did your surgery go? 

survivorbc09
Posts: 4378
Joined: Jun 2009

Just looking to see if you had your surgery and how you're feeling. 

Hugs, Jan

flatpikr's picture
flatpikr
Posts: 11
Joined: Apr 2013

I had DCIS with a 2mm invasive ductal carcinoma, also high grade like yours.  I was put in Stage 1 (T1a).  I had a lumpectomy and sentinal node biopsy.  The node was clear.  I will not be getting any chemotherapy, but I will be doing radiation starting next month.  Then I will be on Tamoxifen for 5 years at least.  In my case, the DCIS was localized to a small area in one breast, so it didn't make sense for me to have a total mastectomy.  Your treatment will depend mostly on whether the nodes are involved or not.  I wish you the best in whatever treatment you end up doing.

Lynne P
Posts: 165
Joined: May 2013

I had dcis and invasive also with a lumpectomy and radiation.  My nodes were clean so chemo wasn't part of my treatment.  I wish you good luck and hope you won't need chemo too.

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