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Fatigue Post-Neprectomy

todd121
Posts: 603
Joined: Dec 2012

It's been on my mind a great deal. Last year before my tumor was found, I was suffering from fatigue and I'd say even some depression for quite a few months. After the tumor was found, I was wondering if the tumor wasn't the culprit. I'd just been thinking it was the normal way to feel at 50.

Since I've had the tumor removed, I've continued to be fatigued. It's really worse, actually. It's 4 months out, and I would have thought that the fatigue from recovering from the surgery would have passed by now. I was ascribing it to the possiblity of being on Everolimus. After seeing my blood work, I'm not at all sure I'm on Everolimus. So I'm back to wondering about the fatigue and what causes it. I asked my nephrologist about having 1 kidney causing fatigue. He said it should not cause that. So, what is the cause of it? Any thoughts? How long does it take to go away?

I know I haven't been exercising enough and I've been drinking coffee again this past week. Today may well be coffee withdrawal.

I've heard others say that they had fatigue for many months after their surgery. Is there a consensus what causes that? I'd like to do something to help alleviate it. Does exercise help? Maybe I'm just going to have to make myself move more.

Todd

Eims's picture
Eims
Posts: 420
Joined: Feb 2013

Todd, I remember my doctor saying to me that I needed to rest quite a lot after my surgery and he said it was a must.  Everyone's body heals at different rates and maybe it is just taking you a little longer but hey thats ok.  Listen to your body and rest if you need to.

Eims x

todd121
Posts: 603
Joined: Dec 2012

Hi Eims,

It's good advice. Sleep is something I've never been fond of. I always have a long to-do list! I have sleep apnea, and have had issues getting restful sleep for many years. It could also be my apnea. When more then 1 variable is present, I get confused so fast!

I was just looking at your picture and thinking, wow! You must be the youngest person we've had post here. And who is that handsome woman posing with you?

Todd

Texas_wedge's picture
Texas_wedge
Posts: 2807
Joined: Nov 2011

It's a bit of a thing with me, but I really do believe getting more exercise will help your fatigue, together with rest as you need it.  Exercise energises. Most people feel less fatigued after exercise than before.  It's much commoner for people who are suffering from chronic fatigue to think they need to rest more when in reality they need to rest less, so long as they get a bit more exercise.  [Of course, your doctor's input is always a given in this.]

A little more exercise will undoubtedly help (maybe even a lot) with your sleep apnea.

todd121
Posts: 603
Joined: Dec 2012

I think I need both. That's my intuition. Finding time to exercise is difficult for me. My job is extremely sedentary, but stressful. When I get home I'm exhausted but have been sitting all day.

Here's to hoping that warmer weather and longer days will help encourage me to get out and walk after work.

Todd

Eims's picture
Eims
Posts: 420
Joined: Feb 2013

Todd,

Could you take a little break and go for a walk during your working day?  You would be surprised what a difference that would make!!

Eims x

 

Eims's picture
Eims
Posts: 420
Joined: Feb 2013

Awwww thanks Todd....that is my middle daugher and she is a little beauty.

Eims x

roaddr23's picture
roaddr23
Posts: 77
Joined: Jan 2013

But obviously you are the younger one,LOL...I was 52 my first go round with this RCC and I was fatigued then for about a month after..and this time I came out of the gate like the favorite in the Kentucky Derby but I must be a Sprinter because I got my butt kicked and had to accept the fact that my 62 yr old body needed to rest so I was a good girl and did..my surgery was Feb 8...this is the first week I can honestly say I am really getting my energy back but a little at a time....You also mentioned that you have always had a problem with sleep...so have I. I am truly a night person. I also have sleep apnea...I was actually famous when working for the Fire Dept for snoring louder then anyone else working there...I am stubborn and refuse to get a CPAP and I honestly do wake myself up snoring sometimes...You said your job is sedentary but very stressful. Before I became a Paramedic I worked for the Fire Department as a 911 call/and radio dispatcher. We worked 2 12 hour days followed by 2 12hr and then 4 days off. We were in a gray room with low lighting so we could read the computer screens. There wasn't any windows or doors. It is a huge county right on the Line of Washington DC so we were constantly busy and there were times you didn't get out of your chair for 4 or 5 hours...you just couldn', so half the time I would be sleeping in the daytime because I had to go to night work but when you got off nights you were so amped up you couldn't relax and go to sleep...especially if you truly are a night person. Then I switched to the medic side and I worked 24 hrs on and 72 off. My husband was a firefighter and he worked an opposite 24 hour shift..oh BTW we also had two young children. As a medic I spent 95% of my career at the busiest stations in the county..I loved it...the time flew by and the calls were tough and challenging...there were many shifts we left the station at 7am and never made it back until 7am the next morning...but I could never go to sleep after my shift. I always drove the night half because many of my partners couldn't stay awake to drive...I used to bowl on 4 different teams and I got off one butt kicking shift and went straight to the bowling alley and almost bowled a 300 game..got a spare in the last frame...anyway..I am getting off track here but stress, which you say you have as I did kept my mind on overdrive..it would not shut off..I had a sleep study and they said I never went into REM sleep at all..so my neurologist who specializes in sleep put me on Ambien...if I took the Ambien and stayed in bed I slept great but sometimes I would take it and not get in bed instead I apparently would shop on EBAY and be totally freaked out when I got emails that said I won the auction...I have a loved antique dresser and a gold coin ($800 coin) at least that has appreciated but the Dr and I decided no more ambien for me. I did learn a few relaxation techniques that I have put to good use. I use them and a headset with Native American Flute Music..that is amazingly relaxing. I still do the bad thing with the TV in my bedroom..but I can't sleep without background noise...I stopped drinking caffeine after 6PM and I set my alarm for 8:30 am everyday (I have been retired since 99) My back has been really screwed up for the past 3 yrs and I have trouble walking now but before that I would meet my daughter every morning at 5:45 and we would walk the boardwalk along the Chesapeake Bay. not a stroll but a good walk and I was full of energy all day and tired at night like normal people were for the first time in my life and once we got used to it we hated it if it rained..it was good for the body and the soul and I hope after I have my back surgery I can go back to doing it...When I started having the back problems I had to be more sedentary but I found I could walk fine in the house because it has carpet and gives ...so I started walking the halls...I have gone from 160 to 142 in the past 8 months or so...I also stopped drinking soda and drink water and sometimes juice...I am still a night person at heart but even when I have one of those I can't sleep nights I still get up at 8:30...I also don't eat dinner later than 6 PM...I think your problem is probably more related to the stress and sleep apnea and if your are a night person like me that just makes it worse...Spring is coming..my daughter went to work everyday after we walked and she said she was much more alert and it was actually easier to handle stressful things that arose...Once again I have written a freaking book (that is actaully something on my bucket list,LOL) I sort of like to explain things like how I get from point a to point b in my thinking, LOL

Texas_wedge's picture
Texas_wedge
Posts: 2807
Joined: Nov 2011

Do you think the sleep apnea is related to these bouts of being tongue-tied?  Smile  I don't think I'd be able to cope if you ever got hyper!

Your book will invent a new genre - not 'stream of consciousness' but the 'torrent of consciousness'!

foxhd's picture
foxhd
Posts: 1934
Joined: Oct 2011

I think my fatigue has been worse my second year from surgery. Maybe something to do with the radiation? This past winter I was really draggin my wagon. May have also been some cabin fever.

todd121
Posts: 603
Joined: Dec 2012

I guess I'm a night person. I have a hard time fallng asleep before 11pm-1am and I'm awful in the mornings. If I have to get up before 9am, I must use an alarm and then I wake up tired. But if I go to sleep really late, like 2-3am, then I still wake up in the morning by 9am regardless of how late I go to sleep, but the next day is ruined. Also, I find it impossible to nap.

I do have a CPAP and use it religously. Have had it for over 10 years. I can't sleep without it. Have been conditioned for so long to using it that even if I try to, I can't fall asleep. I wake myself up as soon as I start to snore. I  hate the thing. I've had real doubts about the science behind needing the thing, but decided to do what the doctor said in the end. Sometimes I thought my apnea is related to weight, but I've needed it way back when my weight was 180, so I'm not so sure. I think it's more related to anatomy.

Todd

irishguy68
Posts: 4
Joined: Mar 2013

Supplements!! livextrong.org has some great advice.

donna_lee's picture
donna_lee
Posts: 411
Joined: Feb 2009

Since I have been through 3 surgeries to remove kidney cancer, I guess that makes me sort of qualified.

In 2005, I had just finished the volunteer task of being responsible for a statewide convention of over 600 people and all the planning, detail work, and managing a couple hundred area volunteers to keep them headed in the right direction.  I thought I was just playing catch up to all that when I started experienciing periodic GI problems.  There always seemed to be a logical reason: travel, convention food, etc., etc.  Until I mentioned the GI problems to my primary care doc at an annual check up in late April 2006.

Ultrasound, then a CT, a bone scan, and a meeting with "genuine, certifiably, smart" docs in Portland, Oregon.  Removed were R. kidney, L half of liver, set of nodes with 2/11 positive, and a congenitally defective gallbladder that had a hamartoma (excess tissue) in the main bile duct.  It took nearly 6 weeks to recover, because I also developed pancreatitis at 3 weeks post surgery.  The rest of the year was a steady climb in energy, capability, and enthusiasm.

Went to Alabama and the SE for a vacation in February 2007.  The last day in Charleston, SC, I stepped off the high curb walking to the car and dislocated my foot and broke my L ankle in 3 places.  Flew home, had surgery a week later and spent 6 weeks on crutches.

Then, in May, the difference between the 9mo and 12mo post CT's showed a lymph node that was more enlarged.  A positive biopsy...and off to surgery.  It seems like a blip in the road.  I drove part way home from Portland the 5th day after surgery and went back to work part time at 1 week.

Re-run the same paragraph again in 2008. No biopsy but I lit up on the PET scan.  More surgery. Felt like crap, incision hurt, back ached, ciarhea/constipation, etc.  Took weeks to even out, recover, feel better or whatever you want.

I don't think there can be any set recovery rate, ever.  Each person is an individual with so many variables that enter the situation.  As a former PE teacher and athlete who liked to downhill ski (and tore up my knee doing so), I remind friends of the general recovery rate from a physical injury.  IF you are physically fit/active/healthy at the time of injury, it will take you 3 days for each day you are away from your established routine.  So off 7 days = 21 days once you can start exercising.  Off 6 weeks= don't expect to be the way you were for 18 weeks, or even longer.

That brings me to almost April Fools' Day 2013.  Another year older, 70 now, test results were good when I saw the doc last week, I still go to work, volunteer in the community, tell bad jokes, and will have the granddaughters to spend the night this weekend.   Who could ask for any more?

Now go to my "Thursday Thoughts" for a chuckle.

Donna

 

 

donna_lee's picture
donna_lee
Posts: 411
Joined: Feb 2009

Since I have been through 3 surgeries to remove kidney cancer, I guess that makes me sort of qualified.

In 2005, I had just finished the volunteer task of being responsible for a statewide convention of over 600 people and all the planning, detail work, and managing a couple hundred area volunteers to keep them headed in the right direction.  I thought I was just playing catch up to all that when I started experienciing periodic GI problems.  There always seemed to be a logical reason: travel, convention food, etc., etc.  Until I mentioned the GI problems to my primary care doc at an annual check up in late April 2006.

Ultrasound, then a CT, a bone scan, and a meeting with "genuine, certifiably, smart" docs in Portland, Oregon.  Removed were R. kidney, L half of liver, set of nodes with 2/11 positive, and a congenitally defective gallbladder that had a hamartoma (excess tissue) in the main bile duct.  It took nearly 6 weeks to recover, because I also developed pancreatitis at 3 weeks post surgery.  The rest of the year was a steady climb in energy, capability, and enthusiasm.

Went to Alabama and the SE for a vacation in February 2007.  The last day in Charleston, SC, I stepped off the high curb walking to the car and dislocated my foot and broke my L ankle in 3 places.  Flew home, had surgery a week later and spent 6 weeks on crutches.

Then, in May, the difference between the 9mo and 12mo post CT's showed a lymph node that was more enlarged.  A positive biopsy...and off to surgery.  It seems like a blip in the road.  I drove part way home from Portland the 5th day after surgery and went back to work part time at 1 week.

Re-run the same paragraph again in 2008. No biopsy but I lit up on the PET scan.  More surgery. Felt like crap, incision hurt, back ached, ciarhea/constipation, etc.  Took weeks to even out, recover, feel better or whatever you want.

I don't think there can be any set recovery rate, ever.  Each person is an individual with so many variables that enter the situation.  As a former PE teacher and athlete who liked to downhill ski (and tore up my knee doing so), I remind friends of the general recovery rate from a physical injury.  IF you are physically fit/active/healthy at the time of injury, it will take you 3 days for each day you are away from your established routine.  So off 7 days = 21 days once you can start exercising.  Off 6 weeks= don't expect to be the way you were for 18 weeks, or even longer.

That brings me to almost April Fools' Day 2013.  Another year older, 70 now, test results were good when I saw the doc last week, I still go to work, volunteer in the community, tell bad jokes, and will have the granddaughters to spend the night this weekend.   Who could ask for any more?

Now go to my "Thursday Thoughts" for a chuckle.

Donna

 

 

todd121
Posts: 603
Joined: Dec 2012

My doctor has pushed me away from supplements. However, now that my blood tests all came back good on the study drug I should revisit supplements because I think he was worried there might be something wrong with my blood tests and he wouldn't know the cause.

Todd

augello55
Posts: 12
Joined: Mar 2013

I had to have 2 major surgeries in a matter of 4 months  1st hysterectomy in october and 5 weeks ago partial nephrectomy.   After the initial 2 weeks i really expected to feel a whole lot better than I do.  I have zero energy and very little appetite...i literally force myself to eat some days.  My doctor says its all part of the recovery.  UGH...feel like there is a tight rubberband across the top of my stomach and I have a 15"scar down my side that feels like there is a board or something in it.  I just started to sleep in my bed but that only lasts about 2-3 hrs if I'm lucky then its back to the recliner with the heating pad.   This is by far the most unconfortable surgery I have had...and believe me I've had several.   I wouldn't say this is the most painful surgery, I truly believe I was in more pain after hysterectomy (but felt great by the 3rd week)   I feel as if I'm losing my mind some days!!   Thank god for my WONDERFUL husband and son who have taken great care of me and my every need.  I owe them big time when (and I am praying its soon) I feel human again.

augello55
Posts: 12
Joined: Mar 2013

I had to have 2 major surgeries in a matter of 4 months  1st hysterectomy in october and 5 weeks ago partial nephrectomy.   After the initial 2 weeks i really expected to feel a whole lot better than I do.  I have zero energy and very little appetite...i literally force myself to eat some days.  My doctor says its all part of the recovery.  UGH...feel like there is a tight rubberband across the top of my stomach and I have a 15"scar down my side that feels like there is a board or something in it.  I just started to sleep in my bed but that only lasts about 2-3 hrs if I'm lucky then its back to the recliner with the heating pad.   This is by far the most unconfortable surgery I have had...and believe me I've had several.   I wouldn't say this is the most painful surgery, I truly believe I was in more pain after hysterectomy (but felt great by the 3rd week)   I feel as if I'm losing my mind some days!!   Thank god for my WONDERFUL husband and son who have taken great care of me and my every need.  I owe them big time when (and I am praying its soon) I feel human again.

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