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fishmanpa's picture
fishmanpa
Posts: 1131
Joined: Jan 2013

Tackstrip posted on a thread about the Voice. As I read through the posts from the beginning, I began to regret doing so.  

Normally, I'm a pretty positive, glass half full kind of guy but I'm having a "moment"... please forgive me. I just need to vent.

Being that my voice is SO important to my livelihood as well as my emotional and mental well being, it wasn't pleasent to read about so many having serious issues with their voice. I know, I know, everyone is different BUT the voice issue seems to be a common thread with everyone. I've essentially had a sore throat since December with my first tonsillectomy. Just when I got to the point where my voice was returning I had the second surgery. Both times, there were days where it hurt so bad to speak that I did so in a whisper. My voice is just now starting to return to normal but I still have pain associated with the surgery. And now?... Treatment starts next week and I'm gonna get hit hard due to the unknown primary. Although they'll be sparing irradiation of my larynx, everything around it will be getting hit in various degrees of rad intensity. I was encouraged being able to sing at my benefit but now, with 35 rad treatments on the horizon, I'm feeling anxious (it didn't help that I had a dream I couldn't sing).

My friend, who had H&N BOT cancer and was treated by many of the same doctors on my team has his voice back. It took almost a year but he's Ok. While that is very encouraging, I am, for the first time in this journey, fearful. As long as I can speak, I can do my job. I'm not worried about losing that ability. Even being permanently hoarse would not impede me from speaking on the phone and doing my job. However, I express myself and who I am through my music. Not just through my playing but also through my singing. I truly don't know what I would do if I lost the ability to sing. Also, the surgery left me with nerve issues. Many are slowly subsiding but the left shoulder issues persist. Pain and weakness are about the same as they were weeks ago despite PT 3X a day wherever I am (arm raises and shoulder shrugs). This has affected my playing, not drastically but it is uncomfortable to hold my arm in the proper position for a long period of time. Let's put it this way....if I had to do a gig, I wouldn't be able to play 50 minutes (a set) without having to rest. I know it could take months to regain the mobility from the nerve damage but it's scary to think I may be one of the small percentage that doesn't. Based on my track record.... unknown primary 1-2%... post operative bleeding 11 days out 1%... Normally it's a good thing to be unique, but in this case I have reason to be concerned! ;)  Ohhhh... lest I forget... one of the side effects from Cisplatin is hearing loss and ringing in the ears! 

Ok... I'm done ~lol~ Time to make the donuts! TGIF! I'm looking forward to the weekend. Two more work days and we're off to Baltimore.
"T" minus 5 days and counting until "T"x day!

"T"

katenorwood
Posts: 1862
Joined: May 2012

T,

You are a very talanted man.  Your words have an impact on all of us.  Yes the side effects beat you up and bang you around.  ( tx's)  But T, at least you are offered a great chance of beating this demon.  I was given a shot at surgery and (rads)...to see if they could stop the progression.  I bombed out of rads 11 sessions in.  Lost my voice w/lessions all through my throat.  I asked at this point after a hospital stay of 4 days, if I should continue as rads are not very effective w/my dx.  I was told it was up to  me, because I knew rads.,  and chemo really don't touch any spread of adcc.  I opted out due to quality of life issues.  But saying this, this has been my journey, and my decissions.  All the thoughts of what this damn demon might take from you, you have to turrn it around and say this will be my new life and I'm going to come out the other side into the sunshine.  Please stay positive !  I always say knowledge is power, and I still believe this.  But trust in your team, and ask the tough questions of them.  And T, know we've all been there, it is scarey as hell.  My best to you and stay strong !    Katie 

phrannie51's picture
phrannie51
Posts: 3852
Joined: Mar 2012

my job here as "Anxiety Mistress"?? Smile  Actually...your worries are understood, I'm a champion worry wort...but they are not well founded (can't use the percentages for bleeding and unknown primary as a basis for the conclusion that you're going to be unique in everything).  Chances are more likely that you've run out of uniqueness.  It's only been a short time since you had your neck dissection....and nerves are slow to heal...I do remember my mom doing her PT for a few months after her dissection before things got pretty close to normal...the key is, that they did get back to where she was doing what she'd always done.  I haven't had a dissection, but a whole of others here have, and they will be able to give you a timeline.  I truly believe that given time, you'll be able to play a set without a problem.

Truly I can understand your worries about your voice....it is such a huge part of the "who" of you....but in the year I've been here, I've only heard 2 or 3 people who actually had big changes in their voices.  I was thinking too of Krashpad....he's a singer, and he said the small changes to his voice made him a better singer....just sayin'.

p

 

donfoo's picture
donfoo
Posts: 1329
Joined: Dec 2012

Hi T,

I wish I could offer more words of encouragement that you can tuck into your wallet but I am still a noobie but here long enough to know that the only certainty is nobody can say after all said and done that they are the same person going in as going out. So, change is certain, just how much change occurs to make the new you, who knows, and me personally never expect the best but the more clasically "hope for the best, plan for the worst" works best for me on this cancer journey.

John uses the term "abi-normal" often to describe the new you as there will be a NEW you as there is for all of us. Often offered out in jest, there is deep meaning to that word, one we all need to accept and assimilate as we journey down our own uncharted path to health.

From your wonderful and open and heartfelt posts, I feel like I know you, like we have sat and chatted over a beer or two, had some good laughs, and connected. I must say you have expressed more than once feeling sort of bushwhacked and coming away from some treatment or appointment or whatever experiencing or hearing something new. Either you have researched and prepared inadequately or maybe have some "blinder on" syndrome and not fully embracing the full range of outcomes.

For me there was a post describing more than SIXTY side effects, that was a real wakeup call for me. And that side effects can be delayed and not present for years. So, John's "abi-normal" is each of our new reality and new normal. We have cancer and that is as permanent a mark on who we are for the rest of our lives as having to say you are a convicted felon. Assimilating this concept helps facilitate the internal reprogramming necessary to stay mentally healthy and on top, in fromt of what lay ahead, knowing it may veer little at times, track straight and true at other times, and even veer wildly taking you off the road altogether and maybe even change the compass heading in a different directions. These are our new and real realities as cancer survivors.

Your speaking voice will return, there is no doubt; put that slip in your wallet. There is a fair chance your inflection and possible ennunciation may be slightly altered due to surgery in your oral cavity. As a musician you know how incredibly complex, subtle, and critical your throat and breathing is for true sound reproduction and also the ability to inpart the most subtle changes that makes some have world class voices and the majority just pedestrian. 

You have a special gift and God gave you those special qualities in your throat structure to allow you to be one of those special people. You know how ON it all has to be for it to all work. From my following musicians, it is a real profession for real professionals in that voice coaching can be part of a life long career and that if not careful a singer can "blow out" and abuse one's focal chords just through overwork and over reaching while performing.

Your voice appartus is like a finely tuned Ferrari engine and gets great high performance and oh sounds just sooooooo sensual and manly when it is all working. But it does not take much for it to lose its ability to reach 160mph and a bit out of adjustment it now only goes 140mph and after a bump in the side wheel well and an ever so slightly tweaked strut, it only goes 90mph before starting to shake.

I love you man but it just seems EVERYTHING has to line up 100% for you to have your singing voice the same going in as going out. At the least, I would encourage you to ponder the possibility and over time embrace the potential that could be part of the new you, your new abi-normal. Just put it into the field of vision of the new you. Do not fall prey to being lured into thinking it will be all fine and hugs and kisses. It is fine to be positive but a disservice to suggest this is the new reality when we all know well we all come up short here and there.

Lastly, give OCF a tryout, I don't see you there but is a very straight shooting and knowledgeble crowd with a few very scary and fight-scarred junk yard dogs watching the place. You will get the full story on anything. If you feel not 100% on your feet, you may want to try this later as they don't pull punches or sugar coat much. 

Very sorry for getting long winded but I care about you and since you have gotten flat-footed before I suggest tuning up what you do before game day and get more prepared for ALL that could happen just in case one of them 60+ side effects rears it head and bites you in the ass.

With love,

Don

personal journal, all invited to join

http:beatdown.cognacom.com 

 

 

CivilMatt's picture
CivilMatt
Posts: 3090
Joined: May 2012

T,

 

The fears are real, your fears are real, but fear is not driving your bus, no way.  Obviously (like all of us) you have been here long enough to see behind the “side effects door”. 

 

You are going to have to turn-up the juice on your positive qualities, that’s your “ace in the hole”.  There is no good chapter in the cancer book for negative thoughts.  I refuse to entertain nothing more than a full functioning voice for you (singing, talking, whistling, etc.).

 

I’ll admit, we have to be realistic and your recovery (procedure) may be intense and slow.  There is no way around what needs to be done to help you see many more fruitful years.

 

As for the surgery, give it some time to heal, seek physical therapy if necessary, and think outside of the box (your strong suit).

 

Your cancer plan while complete is not set in stone.  Keep your team on top of all your conditions.  Maybe get a base line on your hearing.  Many at the H&N forum have had changes to their plans after the start of treatment.

 

Hoping the best for you,

 

Matt

Skiffin16's picture
Skiffin16
Posts: 8103
Joined: Sep 2009

Well disregard anything I have said about my voice being weak if I needed to stress it for very long...

I never have had a strong voice or projection....

To get an idea, people tend to call me mumbles, LOL....

JG

lorig01
Posts: 69
Joined: Jul 2012

Hi. I read your post and detected a lot of anxiety and worry.  I don't post often but I am on this site everyday reading posts. Sometimes twice a day. I think that because you are reading about a lot of voice issues you are worried but I think that a lot of people post only when they have an issue or a question, (except for the posting of angels like Skiffin, Billie, Phrannie etc.),  who respond to questions and offer encouragement. If it makes you feel any better I can tell you that I had stage III tonsil cancer with neck dissection.  I have had no problems with my voice and I love to sing too. Sang with a city chorus for a few years and loved it!  I did have problems with strength and motion with my shoulder and arm on side of neck dissection.  After surgery for months I could not raise my arm high enough to shampoo my hair or put deoderant on.   I am an avid golfer and my ENT thought that I probably wouldn't golf again.  I started golfing 6 weeks after treatment ended months just to get outside. I could not hit drives but I would putt and sometimes chip.  After golfing every weekend for 4 months I forgot about my immobility.  It really didn't occur to me how much more I am able to move until I read your post. I golf every weekend and now hit drives as well. My doctor suggested physical therapy but I am missing too much work as it is with check ups and dental appointments so I don't go. So, even if you are having mobility and strength issues now it will get better!  Please try to concentrate on getting better and completing treatment. Let everyone says it will get better. 

jcortney's picture
jcortney
Posts: 426
Joined: Sep 2012

Ok, take this in for a second.  The vast amount of posts on this board or any other like site ARE NOT from folks telling the world how great they feel and how, after treatment and healing, they are back to or almost back to 100%.  For the most part it's folks that are having problems and looking for support and information.  I truly believe that there is at least as much chance as your voice being as good as, if not better, than it was three months ago.  

The mind is incredibly powerful and our bodies react to what we believe both positive and negative.  You will sing well again my friend.  And, by the grace of god, some of us might meet up to share the event.

We love you man, believe.

Joe

Grandmax4's picture
Grandmax4
Posts: 597
Joined: Dec 2011

Her first words were, "How are you going to survive without an epiglottis?, I've never heard of that...' Scared the crap out of me, I replied, "I don't know, but my Dr Carrau says I will learn to swallow and be able to eat , and I trust him and my God"

That's what I want you to do, trust your medical team and God...my belief is within a year, maybe sooner, you'll be wailing your songs

Ask your therepist about exercises to make your shoulder muscle strong again, it can be done, I know, I did it.

Best of luck, and please keep us posted

 

 

fishmanpa's picture
fishmanpa
Posts: 1131
Joined: Jan 2013

You guys are da best! Joe, you're onto something. The mental aspect is 90% of beating this beast. It really is starting to get to me. With everything that's happened thus far and the reality of treatment just around the corner, I'm taking a mental beating for sure. I'm tellin' ya... a good cigar and a generous glass of cognac would do wonders for my constitution about now! ~lol~

 

This is my brain under normal circumstances...

Healthy Brain

 

Lately, this is my brain with cancer...

Cancer Brain

 

"T"

fishmanpa's picture
fishmanpa
Posts: 1131
Joined: Jan 2013

Throughout my music career I had the opportunity to perform with some amazingly talented musicians and artists. I've had the honor to play on several projects through the years but never had I ever done my own project. It was ne of those things I would do "someday". In 2010 I asked for a raise at work. My boss hemmed and hawed and then said "Why don't you record a CD. Do what you want to do and I'll even make your product." Knowing the value, I accepted that offer. The result was "A Child of Lir", released in Feb. of 2011. It's a collection of originals, covers and traditional pieces that are dear to me. 

The first cut, "Desperate Man", was written 5 or so years ago during an especially difficult time in my life. I had gone through the heart surgery just months before and had resigned from my position as Creative Arts Director at a rather large church. I was truly in a dark place and was reaching out for God's hand to guide me through. It's funny, I've touched more people outside of ministry with that song then I did in the church.....anyway....

As time went on, life began to get better. I was healing both physically and mentally. There came a time when I didn't perform the song as much.  I just didn't feel "desperate" anymore. Lately however, the feeling has returned but in a different capacity. Thus my post today.

You can take a listen at http://www.myspace.com/markt/music/songs/a-child-of-lir-80020561  There are other cuts from the CD there as well :) 

"T"

 

NJShore's picture
NJShore
Posts: 411
Joined: Nov 2012

T,

I am listening as I write, beautiful music..  and I can see why you are so very nervous about all the impacts you potentially are facing. It is scary, it sucks, it's a rotten thing to do to nice people, and it's not fair. It hurts us all. Don't forget though, God gave you more than one gift, and you can perservere. Although it might not have been in your plan, you can.

It's not going to be easy, and your fight is great, you have the gumption to get through this and fight this so well. You have been amazing in all you've gotten through so far. It's that same fight that doesn't want to let go of anything you have, to succumb to Jack. And god willing, with your fight and strength you won't loose anything, but you might need to make some adjustments as you get through this. Pick your battles, focus on what you can do, fight Jack. Don't waste your energy trying to get back to home plate, while you are headed to second base. Concentrate on Second base.. get through the treatment. Then heal. Then put yourself back together. It's amazing what energy it will take, and what time it might take, but if you want it bad enough - you'll get it back and make it ok - because dear friend, that's who you are. That's what you do.

Leave the worrying to us, and we will be there for you..  and I look forward to your song, maybe about a new lease on life :)

Hugs,

Kari

ps - it's ok to be scared, who wouldn't be.. but look at all these great people who have made it to a great place on the otherside. You'll be surprised how fast it will go once you get started. You'll be done before you know it.

phrannie51's picture
phrannie51
Posts: 3852
Joined: Mar 2012

and give Kari a standing ovation...WELL SAID!!! 

p

Duggie88's picture
Duggie88
Posts: 570
Joined: Feb 2010

Kari..........well stated,  I should have read all the posts before I responded to T's concerns.

 

T..............listen to Kari

phrannie51's picture
phrannie51
Posts: 3852
Joined: Mar 2012

I got to listen to your music!!  No sound on the home computer, so I thought "ok, I'll listen at work"...ah, but then got there and saw it was at MySpace....that's a no no there.  So......yesterday I decided enough was enough on the no sound at home, and got busy working on that.  Done deal!  I LOVE your voice.......and you can play your guitar like nobody's business...I am so SO impressed.

Thanks for the lift.......I played music while I surfed the net.

p

fishmanpa's picture
fishmanpa
Posts: 1131
Joined: Jan 2013

Thank you P!

Thank means alot :) Not bad for someone who retired from the business for 15 years eh? ~lol~ MySpace is the only place you can listen to entire cuts. Everywhere else just plays clips.

"T"

fishmanpa's picture
fishmanpa
Posts: 1131
Joined: Jan 2013

I have some vague memories of my Great Grandparents. They came to the United States from Russia in the early 1900's. My Pop Pop (my Mom's Dad) was about 6 years old when they arrived. I'm named Mark after my Great Grandmother Martha. I don't recall very much other than some images in my mind of their faces. I do recall them speaking in a launguage I didn't understand. Turns out they were speaking Yiddish! So here I was, this little boy, hanging out with my Yiddish speaking Russian Great Grandparents for a great deal of time as my parents worked and they babysat me. 

So... picture this.... My Mom takes me to the doctor and I have to get a shot. I apparently had a fear of needles. She tells me I would get this determined look in my eyes and say with a Yiddish accent "I don't vant it... no... no.. no... I don't vant it!" A five year old little boy sounding like an old Jewish guy! The doctor would just laaaugh! 

Fortunately I overcame my fear of needles when I was around 9 years old or so as I suffered from constant sinus infections and ear problems. Turns out I had allergies. I was admitted to the hospital and had scratch tests done and those two dozen or so needles in each arm just under the skin with things I could be allergic to. I was like a human pin cushion. Then it was several years of allergy shots. I still don't like needles but I'm not afraid any more. 

So now... facing this? I feel like that little 5 year old...  "I DON'T VANT IT!.. I DON'T VANT IT!" But like that 9 year old boy, I have to put on a brave face, stick out my arm and say "Go for it!". I don't like it nor do I want to do it but I have to do what I have to do to get better. 

Truly, from the bottom of my heart, thank you everyone for your encouragement, kind words and honesty. You're my cyber brothers and sisters in arms. I appeciate it more than words can say. First things first. Get through this treatment. One day at a time. Then I'll deal with the aftermath. 

Oy Vey...

"T"

wolfen's picture
wolfen
Posts: 1209
Joined: Apr 2009

You are a man of strong faith with many talents and gifts to offer. "BELIEVE"

If, in the future, a "new normal" should emerge, I know you will adapt and still share your beautiful music.

I will "BELIEVE" for you also.

Luv,

Wolfen

rachel12yrsuv's picture
rachel12yrsuv
Posts: 432
Joined: Feb 2013

T,

What can I add that hasn't already been said by apparently some really smart people. When I posted about my mountain and how steep the climb, you were right there as positive as can be telling me I will make, the odds are really against me but I will fight.

Don't let what thety tell may or will happen get you down, first they have to tell you to cover their butts, but they don't know Gods plan for you, or what and how you spread His message, you do. In your heart, in your soul you can hear his voice telling you it'll be alright, reach out and trust Me and I will protect you! You know T, trust Him!

I lost my hair in treatment, I had hair to my butt and an 80's girl so hair is my world, my rad onc made me take off my wig and he took a picture of my bald head and said my hair would not grow back. I was 29, what do you mean, how humuliating that was. 6months later with hair grown to about.1 or two, I wore my wig and when his was all done I said go get your camera, he said why? I took off my wig and said to take a picture of this to show your class, don't ever tell a 29 yr old woman her. Hair won't grow back if you don't know for sure! He laughed, got his camera and took picture.

You know the moral here, he didn't control that, nor did i , God did!

BELIEVE!

I am praying when all said and done, you are spreading your message the way God intended you too!

Rest your worried mind friend,

Rachel

fishmanpa's picture
fishmanpa
Posts: 1131
Joined: Jan 2013

Hi Rachel,

Thank you for your encouragement. The thing is, in the midst of my "moment" I knew I was in His hands. As hard as we try to stay in His light and peace, our humaness takes over and we allow ourselves to sink into the depths of darkness.  Perhaps we need to hear it from someone else to awaken from the bad dream and realize the truth.

I'm at peace with everything. I'm as ready as I'm going to be to do this. I have a good team and I'll be at the best facility in the country to treat me. I'll take it one day at a time and deal with the bumps in the road as they come up. At least for now, I have good shocks ;)

Thank you again for your post and your prayers.

"T"

 

Ingrid K's picture
Ingrid K
Posts: 811
Joined: Mar 2011

Okay, T-Man.....

Like you say, the pity party is over....we gave you 24 hours to vent and get it out of your system !!  Now it's time to move on and worry about things that you CAN control.   You can't control how and when your voice will come back, so don't borrow sorrow from tomorrow.  You have a wonderful woman who loves you and a whole lot of us standing behind you wishing you success.

You have every right to be anxious about what may happen to your voice...but the treatment is necessary to save your life.  Whether your voice is compromised or not...at least you will be here to worry about it.

Remember how much you have already come through....the heart attack alone would have stopped many of us in our tracks.  You make it seem like a bump in the road.

Since your first day on this forum, you have been so optimistic and a glass half full kind of personality....don't stop that now.

(That was my kick-in-the-pants speech...so pull yourself up and enjoy the last few days before treatment)

 

 

peggylulu's picture
peggylulu
Posts: 367
Joined: Dec 2012

I agree with what Ingridk said !Very well said ! 

Ingrid K's picture
Ingrid K
Posts: 811
Joined: Mar 2011

Mark:

I just reread my earlier post and I may have come on too strong.

I was shooting from the hip and I do apologize if I was too harsh.

Sorry.

denistd's picture
denistd
Posts: 517
Joined: Apr 2009

Mark, as you know I had cancer of the voice box and I have been a musician that sings for the greater part of my life. I have listened to your music, it's great. As I told you my voice is the same as it always was, took a little while but not that long. The only thing I cannot do that I'd done before was hit high falsetto notes and struggle a little with high notes in my normal singing voice, but I never did much of that anyway,99% of the songs I sang did not require hitting them. Your voice is very mellow and mid toned so you probably do not sing high notes all of the time, no Frankie Valli there. Having listened to your music and having been through the cancer concert I truly believe your voice recapture will not be a problem. Denis

fishmanpa's picture
fishmanpa
Posts: 1131
Joined: Jan 2013

Thanks Denis,

From what I've read, you're an exception. My reality may be much different as the unknown primary warrants a more extensive field of radiation. I know the left side of my neck where the tumors were located will get a 70 dose of rads (I don't know the technical jargon for that). Other areas will get less depending. They will be hitting my entire neck and head but will spare my larynx. I'll get more details Wednesday at the dry run. 

I'll be seeing my MO on Friday and I will discuss the chemo at that point but one of the common side effects is ringing in the ears and loss of hearing. I'm not too happy with that. I don't know if there's an alternative drug for me. Because of my cardiac issues, they have to be very careful as chemo drugs are very hard on the heart. 

Thanks for the encouragement. Time will tell what my new abi-normal will be.

"T"

 

Tim6003's picture
Tim6003
Posts: 1497
Joined: Nov 2011

So much good advice from others, I can't add to any of that.  What will come will come but like all the others said, with your attitude, your talents and your "zest" that you project in your posts, you will do great and be great at what you do no matter what!  That is truly what I believe.

My voice has changed.  Now people tell me I have a "sexy, raspy voice"....no kidding.  A little blush when they tell me that, but I've heard it no less than a dozen times since my last treatment....my wife thinks it's funny too.

I've never been able to carry a tune, in fact people who sit in front of me move during hymns in church, no kidding on that one either.  :)

I've always admired those that can sing, play and write music.  Even a been envious.  So keep the faith and do well my friend.

 

Tim

alligatorpointer's picture
alligatorpointer
Posts: 131
Joined: Jul 2012

I posted this a little while ago in a thread on "Cisplatin" ... but thought I would repeat it here in case you are checking this thread instead , Mark ...

"T" ,  my son also received the 7 weekly Cisplatin chemo txs concurrent with the rads.  He completed treatment in Sept. 2012 and does not seem to have suffered any hearing loss or tininitis from it.  It was explained to us that when the Cisplatin is given one day a week during 7 weeks of rads, that it is a low dose of Cisplatin and its purpose is to weaken the tumor so that the rads are better able to destroy it.  When used in that way, Cisplatin is given at a more tolerable lower dose (with less side effects) and only used to assist the Rads (i.e. rads are the primary treatment modality and chemo is only secondary).  My son's rad onc was adamant that the Cisplatin be started at the beginning of the first week of rads because the rads do not work as well if the low dose Cisplatin has not been used to weaken the tumor.  My son's tumor was on his left false vocal cord (ary-epiglottic fold).  His voice seems strong and normal now, even though he was only able to manage a weak whisper in the final weeks of treatment and for several weeks after.  He did not have the "loss of ability to sing" concerns because his llivihood does not depend on his voice although he does play guitar and has been in several 'garage bands' with friends.  His singing voice has always been merely adequate ... never high quality like yours.  His speaking voice certainly sounds fine to me ... exactly like himself ... a source of much joy for me to hear when I speak to him by phone.  I stayed with him as his caregiver while he went through treatment, but my own house is a long distance away ... so now that he has NED status, we only keep in touch  by phone.   He has mostly been spending all his free time skiing ... so far he has been able to ski 40 days this winter.  The desire to recover enough post-tx to get out on the slopes this winter was a powerful motivation for him to regain his physical fitness ... and he did it.    "T", you also have some powerful motivations and from reading your posts you have great inner strength.  You have what it takes to survive and thrive.  Stock up on what you need onhand to help you with some of the things you can try to control ...  Mugard and other mouth care tips members of this forum have shared as helpful in avoiding mouth sores... ointments and creams to apply for exterior skin burning and redness ... pain control meds your doctors can provide if you keep them aware of when you need some numbing... all those things in the SUPERTHREAD that can pave your path to get through this.  Then try to relax as best you can and let those who care about you do some of the heavy lifting. 

Duggie88's picture
Duggie88
Posts: 570
Joined: Feb 2010

They told me after surgery and radiation that whatever didn't return in a year, chances are I won't get it back. Trust me, they were wrong it has been three years and my voice is still making a comeback. I also had left shoulder issues due to having muscle damage from surgery. I couldn't even carry a gallon of milk and had limited use. But, along with neck massages for edema I also had physical therapy for the shoulder 3 times a week for about 6 months. The shoulder came back and like I said the voice is still making progress. I understand that a singing voice is far different than a speaking voice but my friend, I say give it time and exercise it within reason without over doing it, along with that positive attitude you will be back on stage before you know it.

Enjoy the day

      Jeff

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