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Possible RCC with upcoming surgery

pinkstar's picture
pinkstar
Posts: 53
Joined: Mar 2013

Hello,

I am a 40 year old woman who is new to this site and I sincerely appreciate any feedback. In 2010 I had an abdominal ultrasound, as a requirement for the Lap Band procedure (later decided against the surgery). 3 months after the procedure, I received a letter stating that they found a suspicious mass on my left kidney & suggested that I see my regular Dr. So, I went to my Dr and he stated they found a 2.6 cm solid mass on my left kidney & wanted an MRI to confirm. Needless to say, my world was devastated. A little history...I lost 3 family members to pancreatic cancer, 1 to lung cancer, 1 to bone cancer and this is all from my mothers side. Cancer does not run on my biological fathers side (don't know much about this side) but I do know he had a kidney removed in the 60's, before he met my mother. I have asked my fathers side of the family if anyone knew why it was removed but no one knows. He died in 2009 from complications of congested heart failure. My labs (creatinine, GFR & BUN) have always been normal. I have never had pain or any health issues other than being a type 2 diabetic (well controlled with diet, activity & metformin). My Dr referred me to a Urologist who explained to me the necessity of a partial nephrectomy with assistance of the Divinci Robot. He was confident that the mass resembled RCC. I explained to him that I never once felt that I had RCC and I fought it every step of the way (STILL DO =0). I had another MRI done right before my pre-op appt and I heard the Dr talking outside my door. I heard him telling another Dr that he has never seen anything like this. He comes into my room then asks me to follow him to his computer. He showed me the actual MRI film and asked what I saw (I have been in the medical field for over 20 years & I was a recent LVN graduate). I told him that the mass was indeed solid but perfect in shape. It didn't look ugly or have what I know to be, cancer characteristics. The Urologist said that he didn't feel that I needed the surgery ASAP & we agreed to wait 6 months to do a repeat CT scan. 6 months later I had the CT scan and the mass was the same size 2.6cm. Shortly after this, my insurance benefits ran out. Fast forward 1 1/2 years later & I got sick with diverticulitis. I was in the hospital for 3 days cause of the mass but at the time I didn't know. Not once did a Dr talk to me about it & I was in so much pain that I wasn't thinking. After I went home, I went back to the hospital for a copy of my medical records. I saw that the mass grew to 4.4cm with no mestasis, not doing anything but growing then sitting there & sometimes not even growing. This was a county facility and they never mentioned doing surgery or anything about it. Now that I do have insurance & a Urologist, he has recommended a total removal of my left kidney. He has said that he does feel that I have RCC (according to his experience) and feels positive of my outcome. We are hoping to do the surgery 5/2013. Now that I feel that I have said it all =0), I would appreciate any words of advice. Yes, I am a working nurse (also in school pursuing my RN) but this is not my field of expertise. I have my moments of saddness but mostly I have feelings of fear for my future. I feel this isn't RCC but something in which has to do with my biological father. I have done so much research & honestly, this is the absolute BEST resource out there for support.

Thank you & may god bless all of us. Keep the hope, keep the faith & always keep the dream alive.

Donna

Texas_wedge's picture
Texas_wedge
Posts: 2807
Joined: Nov 2011

Donna, welcome here - yes it is a very good support facility.

You're a good story teller and have introduced an element of mystery too.  Do you care to say what you fear the lesion may be and why you connect it with your biological Father?  For most people the idea that it is cancer is scary enough and they wouldn't imagine anything else could be scarier!

Why are you so convinced that you don't have RCC?  It's frequently asymptomatic, as you doubtless know.

If it continues to grow it will be a major inconvenience at some stage, even if it's benign, so having it removed makes good sense and then you'll know for sure what it is.   With luck, it's benign and you can forget all about us here (though you may want to consult a bit about recovery from major abdominal surgery) and get on with your carrer and your studies.

pinkstar's picture
pinkstar
Posts: 53
Joined: Mar 2013

Thank you Texas!!! I think my back ground forces me to tell it all. hahaha...I am honest & I have nothing to hide. Although, this is probably what makes me a good nurse. I fear the lesion may be RCC, which if it is I would be considered stage 1b (if my memory serves me correctly). I am connecting this experience with my biological father as we were nearly the same age at the time of surgery (he had his done in his early 30's & I found this in my late 30's). Health wise, I tend to take more after him than my mother (THANK GOD). I have always said, he may not have been the father he should have been but he definitely could be what saves my life.

With all the physical research I have done on RCC, I don't believe I have it. Could be denial but I call it surviving.

I totally agree with you 100%!!! Regardless of it's nature, it needs to be removed. This whole thing is just weird & somewhat of may be a medical mystery but I am grateful for this site. If this experience makes me a better woman, daughter, sister, friend & nurse then I am indeed the winner. No matter what the mass is I will remain on this site, if just to offer support.

icemantoo's picture
icemantoo
Posts: 1657
Joined: Jan 2010

Donna,

 

While a number of persons have come on this site with doubt whether the little buggar was RCC or not, it turns out that it usually is although I do remember the exception. With some types of tumors they are or will become RCC. RCC sucks. If it gets bigger and spreads you face serious consequences. If it is taken out while it is small the surgery is usually a total cure. All of us on this board have had the surgery. Not fun, but it beats the alternative.

What a way to get extra insight as part of your RN training.

 

Icemantoo

 

pinkstar's picture
pinkstar
Posts: 53
Joined: Mar 2013

Thank you, Icemantoo! I am forced to wait till May for surgery as I just started a new job & praying I make it till my probation is over (end of April). I am lucky enough that my health insurance kicked in 30 days after I started. I am hoping & praying every day that it has not grown or metastasized. At the last CT scan, it was in the middle of my kidney & just sitting there not doing anything. Which is why my current Urologist has recommended a total nephrectomy, rather than a partial. We are also planning on it being done laparoscopically, rather than open. I have come to the realization that the surgery is very necessary & I am comfortable with the total removal of my left kidney. Not so sure of what the mass is made of but I know I will survive this just as I have survived everything else.  =0) 

pinkstar's picture
pinkstar
Posts: 53
Joined: Mar 2013

Sorry for the duplicate post. I don't know how to delete just yet.  =0)

Texas_wedge's picture
Texas_wedge
Posts: 2807
Joined: Nov 2011

Dere ain't no way, lady, and we all do it; so just don't worry about it - you won't be thrown out of our Club for it!

Limelife50's picture
Limelife50
Posts: 420
Joined: Nov 2011

Hi Donna well i guess everyone procrastinated and that tumor is not getting any smaller,SO GET IT OUT!!!,with that said you should be fine,oh almost forgot WELCOME to this fine discssion board

foxhd's picture
foxhd
Posts: 2065
Joined: Oct 2011

I know one problem you have. Because you are a nurse, you are not prepared to be a patient. It is hard for a health care giver to switch roles. Ask me. You will get through this decision making time and do the right thing. Sorry about your up coming surgery but it is always best to be done as early as possible. Delay only makes it worse. Good luck.

pinkstar's picture
pinkstar
Posts: 53
Joined: Mar 2013

Hi,

Thank you! Yes, we procrastinated cause it didn't grow for a period of time. Also, my health insurance ran out at that time. I had absolutely no choice. I have suffered with this in my thoughts & it's been hard especially considering that I have wanted it out of my body since I knew it was there.

pinkstar's picture
pinkstar
Posts: 53
Joined: Mar 2013

Hi,

Thank you! Yes, we procrastinated cause it didn't grow for a period of time. Also, my health insurance ran out at that time. I had absolutely no choice. I have suffered with this in my thoughts & it's been hard especially considering that I have wanted it out of my body since I knew it was there.

pinkstar's picture
pinkstar
Posts: 53
Joined: Mar 2013

Hi,

Thank you! I agree. LOL...I am ok with the surgery aspect & my Urologist expects to keep me out of work for 2 weeks. I was like that's it? haha...He said that was all he expected me to need, as I am healthy other than for the mass. So we shall see.

pinkstar's picture
pinkstar
Posts: 53
Joined: Mar 2013

HA! How do I delete the multiple post?

todd121
Posts: 641
Joined: Dec 2012

Hi Donna,

Sorry you've had to come here. I was in a similar situation to you in early December. The mass in my kidney was 6.8 cm and in the center of my right kidney. They removed my right kidney December 10th. Being asymptomatic is not unusual. If the tumor is a long way from the collection area of the kidney, you might not even have bleeding. From what I've read, these tumors are near 90% clear cell RCC. They are benign in something around 5%. That's probably why your urologist is pretty sure that's what it is. If it's not a cyst, and it's not a benign tumor that is able to be seen on the CT, then it's probably RCC and probably clear cell. However, they aren't going to know what it is until they get it out and send it to a pathologist for a report. Hopefully it will be some kind of benign thing.

Mine turned out to be clear cell RCC, stage 3, grade 3. I was hoping for stage 1, but my tumor had grown into the veins so that bumpted the stage from 1 to 3, which I didn't find out until the pathology report came in.

Are you seeing urologic oncologist? Or a general urologist? I'm assuming he's a urologic oncologist if he's doing the surgery via laparascopy.

Personally I think the 2 weeks back to work is a ridiculous idea after a radical nephrectomy, especially if you need to move around a lot on your job. I took 6 weeks off and was glad I did. I probably could have gone back to work after 4, but I was glad to have time to focus on getting better. I was also glad to get back to work.

Hope you'll stick around and keep us updated on how you are doing.

If you are interested in boning up on kidney type issues in general, my surgeon has a great website going over all the issues in a very condensed manner. Check it out. It's very up-to-date, very informative, and also very condensed, http://www.kidneycancerinstitute.com/

Best wishes to you,

Todd

pinkstar's picture
pinkstar
Posts: 53
Joined: Mar 2013

I definitely plan on sticking around & yes, I am very much aware that masses in the kidney are 80% of the time RCC. The coincidence is with my biological father's kidney removal. I wish I knew more but I will never know. To 3 Urologists the mass is similar to RCC but when it didn't grow, 1 Urologist said he felt it wasn't. Who knows? I sure don't. All I know is I will beat whatever is. They won't be doing any sort of biopsy, so no news till surgery & a pathology report is done.

Thank you for your reply.

Donna

LKidd
Posts: 37
Joined: Feb 2013

Donna - Welcome. Your story is interesting. It's relieving to find this site, so supportive and lots of great information and experience.

Contrary to Icemantoo's comments, not all on this board have had the surgery. There are some planning to do so, some still deciding, and I am sure some that the outcome was benign and no surgery was needed. Have you considered a biopsy to positively identify it? A 3cm mass was found on my left kidney 1/1/13. The 1st Urologist I went to said he had never seen a tumor like mine. He consulted with colleagues and basically said none of them had seen one like that, 80% of all tumors are RCC and he recommended the surgery to remove part or all of my kidney - to be decided. I researched and found a 2nd doctor who was recognized on the top doctors list. I went to him, he is a Urologist also. He felt differently. He had also never seen one like mine, but feels by what he's seen similar and his gut, that it might be benign. He felt biopsy was the 1st recommendation, watching it was 2nd, and the surgery a far off distant 3rd. I inquired about a biopsy spreading cancer cells if it did turn out to be cancer. He said that risk is there, but so extremely low that even if it was cancer it is too low to just accept the alternative of full surgery with my kidney taken out which is a huge step and very difficult from what I have read. I applaud all on here who have had it and are doing well, I have even followed some stories for them going through it so it is a wonderful cure and option for cancer and a very lucky option with this particular type. For me, we are not sure it is cancer so I did the biopsy yesterday first. The biopsy was tough, you can read about it if interested in the experience under Lkidd. But have you considered that option to positively identify it before deciding on surgery?

Welcome again, we are here to support you.

dhs1963's picture
dhs1963
Posts: 394
Joined: May 2012

You could get it biopsied, but statstically, it is 90% likely it is RCC.  My tumor, 6x5x5, was both acressive (grade for because Sarcomotoid) and symptom free.  Unfortunately mine metastisized to my lung; the met may have been before or after the surgery. 

RCC is usually symptom free in stage 1.  The real danger of RCC is that by the time there are symptoms, the cancer is much more advanced with a much worse prognosis.  With a stage 1B tumor, odds are you will be cured from surgery.

GSRon's picture
GSRon
Posts: 1306
Joined: Jan 2013

Keep in mind that RCC is usually very slow growing... so in 6 months time a "normaL' scan (no contrast) may or may not be able to measure the growth.. but.. as you now know, it IS growing..  I must tell you, for me, the surgery was pretty easy overall... the fear was far worse than the reality...  I had pain for a few days that was controlled by the drugs, and it lessened a lot faster than I had imagined... down to Tylenol in about 2 weeks.. then nothing... Hang in there..

Ron

pinkstar's picture
pinkstar
Posts: 53
Joined: Mar 2013

Yes, I understand that it is slow growing. I feel lucky regardless. I am praying for no growth since 8/12 & no mestastistizing or anything else. I feel good, so I am rolling with that.

Wow...sounds like you had a perfect recovery. I can only hope for the same.

pinkstar's picture
pinkstar
Posts: 53
Joined: Mar 2013

I know I am lucky for many reasons and I am sorry your's has metastisized. I have nothing anywhere else & I don't plan on it. No matter what, we have to remain hopeful & positive. Especially when it gets tough! According to the MRI's & CT scans that I've had, there is no vein or other involvement.

foxhd's picture
foxhd
Posts: 2065
Joined: Oct 2011

Sometimes I keep the simplistic approach. When I figure that it doesn't matter exactly what the specifics are of the tumor are, I also figure there is nothing I can do about it. So, I begin the post op planning.Find time for a little more exercise and endurance training. I have a theory (sp?) that goes like this.....Most strength and conditioning training is about building muscle and cardio vascular endurance. That is why so many people give up on exercise after missing a few sessions. After a short break, what was gained is quickly lost. So many people say screw it. I believe that what should be concentrated on during workouts is the technique and skill associated with the activities. Sort of like learning to play the guitar or something similar. Then even after short breaks, as you return to the activity, the skill may be rusty, but intact. With a bit of practice, you can return to form in a relatively short period of time. So whether it be yoga, jogging, or  weight training begin your preparation for your recovery now. Your body will have  it's memory of how it should be. This shortens the process considerably....just a thought....or a rambling. ..or the percocet talking.

NanoSecond's picture
NanoSecond
Posts: 607
Joined: Oct 2012

Hi Fox,

I think what you say makes a lot of sense.  And I ran out of my Percocet perscription months ago. :)

But have you any advice for those of us (me) who intellectually realize the importance of strength or conditioning training but just can't motivate themselves to start in the first place (let alone keep at it)?

Thanks for any thoughts on this.

foxhd's picture
foxhd
Posts: 2065
Joined: Oct 2011

Some people are jocks. Some are not. It is difficult to motivate someone. You have to find something that you like. And most people need a buddy system. Some like weights, running, hiking, bicycling or swimming. I fall into the category where I don't need a gym or anyone else to motivate me. Like you do with nutrition. Me on the other hand never met a pizza and a pitcher that I didn't like. In days of old when I wanted to run my first marathon, I would tell everyone that today I was gonna run 10 miles and tomorrow I would run 5, etc. My big mouth made me stick to my verbal contracts as I didn't want to look like a bigger jerk than I already am.

GSRon's picture
GSRon
Posts: 1306
Joined: Jan 2013

I am in the process of buying a (used) treadmill... and the first thing I will do is mount my laptop on it... I spend a lot of time reading on line.. and can do that while getting some exercize..  But as stated what motivates us is individual...   My motivation is to stay as healthy as possible, and exercize and diet are my two controllables..  while the RCC is not...

Find what will work for you... and stay well..

Ron

Texas_wedge's picture
Texas_wedge
Posts: 2807
Joined: Nov 2011

Neil, now you're into my bag!! (not referring to golf bag).  I've kept in pretty good shape all my life and it's probably helped a lot in recovery from my 2 open ops and in handling my current chemo well.  It also contributes to enjoyment of life - everything is easier and less fatiguing.  More things are within one's scope (at 70,  I can still enjoy playing two rounds of golf in a day - weather permitting!).  

[I've never taken anything very seriously but I have competed in Uni teams in three different sports (plus snooker and chess both of which burn a lot more calories than most people would imagine!).  I have an Award in Physical Education from Edinburgh Uni. and am a qualified weight-lifting instructor and referee.  In maturer years I've run a number of half and full marathons, the last being the London Marathon of 2,000, when I was 57.  I've written training schedules for people for general health and for specific sports in the past. Reading books on exercise physiology was a bit of a hobby for a number of years.  All of this is a long, long time ago, but I'm sure I'm still reaping the benefits of that lifestyle, all these years later.]

So,  in all conscience, I feel that I can make some comments that might be of use to you. 

The first is that current wisdom and practical experience shows that massive gains (of all kinds) can be made from exercise without much time spent.  More of that in a moment. 

The next thing to say is that whatever you elect to do to reap the benefits, it should be something you actually enjoy doing.  There's an important rider to this: people are often astounded by how much they can actually enjoy exercise or sports that they couldn't have envisaged deriving pleasure from. 

Once you know how much you stand to gain it becomes easier to go for it and the benefits then act as a big incentive for continuing.  If you've in the past been more geek than jock you probably won't have had occasion to come across the striking papers that show huge pay-offs for ageing academics from a sensible programme of increased physical exercise.   They not only feel better but get round to completing stalled projects, finishing pieces of neglected research, publishing papers they otherwise wouldn't have had the energy to do and so on. 

There's no doubt that if you want to keep your cognitive function in shape what you need is not so much 'brain gyms' but the real thing.  You will derive more mental benefit from physical exercise than you possibly can from simply performing mental tasks to try to keep your brain from declining.  The scientific evidence is there and you don't have to look hard to find the physiological explanations.

Currently there's much debate about two old observations, both sporting shiny new acronyms - HIT and NEAT.  You can easily find innumerable treatments of each and this short piece gives a little insight and a rough idea about them.

http://www.ultimate-exercise.com/hitandneat.html

Next,  I must confirm the appropriateness of the subject line of your message because it's important to realise that you get more medical and health benefit (and in far less time) from strength training than from aerobic conditioning and you get more spillover aerobic benefit from the right kinds of strength training than vice versa.  (Obviously I'm talking here about formal 'exercise' rather than sports - not suggesting you need to take up hammer-throwing rather than cross-country running!).  Thus, progressive resistance exercise is better than other forms.  Please note that I'm far from knocking the merits of e.g. tai chi, hatha yoga Pilates etc, which all have considerable gains to offer, but ideally in addition to strength training.

NEAT v HIT :   The former (non-exercise activity thermogenesis) is really addressed to those wanting to shed unwanted weight and/or to keep reasonably healthy.  It's essentially just a matter of recognising that BMR (basal metabolic rate, as I'm sure you know) is significantly raised by a very low level of activity so that keeping 'on the go' all day, with normal sorts of activities, even down to restlessly fidgeting, will achieve the desired results, so long as there's enough of it.  Using a pedometer or modern version (e.g. a Fitbit)  and aiming to do ten thousand steps a day, for instance, is putting it on a more organised basis and underwriting carrying it out, but it doesn't necessitate such an approach.

However, what I'm advocating, for big pay-off with a small investment of time, is HIT - high intensity training.  There are variants of this label and acronym but they amount to the same thing - short bursts of taxing activity interspersed with brief rest periods.  This is the familiar concept of "interval training" espoused by both track and distance running athletes and also the rep and set training practised by weight-lifters, and strength athletes generally, and akin to the 'heavy duty' schedules followed by some bodybuilders.

It hardly needs saying that you need to be at a certain minimum level of health and fitness before embarking on it for real, and need the approval (or rather the non-embargo) of your docs before doing it, unless you're already working out at a decent standard of fitness.  

There is a lot of mythology surrounding the topics of 'warming-up' (which is fundamentally a bogus notion) and 'cooling down'  which is really a misnomer for not stopping vigorous exercise abruptly and incurring venous pooling etc, which is better avoided.  There's also the vexed topic of doing stretching exercises before exercise - done too enthusiastically (especially if ballistic movements are involved) it has been shown to do more harm than good by causing more injuries than it prevents.   Accordingly, significant time savings are achieved by not wasting time on long rituals of warm-up and stretching.  (Good treatises on the subject  will counsel all that's required.)  This, coupled with the small amount of actual workout time required, comes down to an astonishingly tiny time requirement even for absolutely optimal results.  We're talking about a real transformation in a matter of, approximately, a quarter to half an hour three times a week.  (Just by the way, I've had for a number of years now a book on the  1 minute Workout for Golfers - based on the same principle of very hard very brief exercise, utilising what lifters would term 'negatives'.)

If you want to delve a little into it, you could, I don't doubt, find a number of good books on the topic.  You may recall one I mentioned I read a few weeks ago which I found excellent. It's by a molecular physiologist and lecturer at one of the Universities here, in Dundee and called "The High Intensity Workout" - authors Dr. John Babraj and Dr. Ross Lorimer and is a brief, inexpensive paperback, packed with useful info.  You would enjoy it for its exposition of the relevant science and would, I believe, be persuaded of the merits of the mitochondrial enhancements that are at the heart of the value of this kind of workout.   The workout schedules given are very simple and require no equipment if you do the running version (e.g. a small series of 6-second flat out sprints up a suitable hill, interspersed with gentle strolls back down again) or swimming.   They are most conveniently carried out on a bicycle ergometer, elliptical cross-trainer or such-like, or a good quality rowing machine such as the ones on offer in commercial gyms, university gyms, sports centers and country clubs.

Those are my immediate thoughts on this but as you can maybe guess this is a bit of a hobby-horse of mine and I'd be very happy to discuss it further should you feel any desire to do so.   (If not, then I would at least say don't follow the advice of George Bernard Shaw which was, very roughly,  'Whenever I feel an overwhelming need to take vigorous exercise I immediately go and lie down until the feeling passes off.')

NanoSecond's picture
NanoSecond
Posts: 607
Joined: Oct 2012

Tex,

Many, many thanks for your detailed response.  I am going to print it out and study it.  I may have some time to do that now, since, for the first time this year, we here in the DC area are "supposed" to get hit with a major snow and wind storm.  If so, as is typical, we will likely lose power and internet access.  Having been through this drill several times already - I have a generator that will provide us with enough juice to power our water pump (we have well water), the hot water heater, the furnace, and some lights and electronics.  But what I can't control is access to the internet - so I may go silent for a while.

I do plan to pick your brain further though.  One thing that I did enjoy in my younger daze was canoeing and rowing.  I notice that is an activity that you still enjoy - so maybe I should start there.

Thanks again to you and Fox for getting me started on something that has bugged me for several years now - too much geek and not enough jock...

 

-N

Texas_wedge's picture
Texas_wedge
Posts: 2807
Joined: Nov 2011

Neil, with Fox and Gary in the offing, I fear some awful ribbing about geek-straps may be in the wind - that last sentence of yours is really asking for trouble, though maybe you're knowingly tossing them some bait?!

If you are going to re-start some exercise activity, rowing is near perfect.  It's non load-bearing and non-impact, like swimming and, also like swimming (actual swimming, not just paddling about) it works all the major muscle groups.  The Concept2 machines are the ones the Olympic crews and serious club oarsmen the world over use for out of season, off-water training, and are a good simulation (minus the wind, sun, rain and the feathering of the oar).   I've had a few slightly less good days in the last week and have played a few rounds of golf and taken some lovely walks with my Wife, but not rowed. On resumption, maybe tomorrow, I'm going into HIT again, with cycles of 30 secs flat out on maximum resistance followed by 4 minutes of "active rest" - keeping moving by gentle paddling.  The senior author of the book I mentioned agrees that rowing is a suitable activity though I speculated that the parameters may need experimentation given the nature of rowing - stroke followed by a break before the next 'catch'.

It's inspiring to know that John Babraj is himself an ultra-marathoner.  I asked him the other day, whether he's run the Comrades Marathon in South Africa (more than twice the length of a Marathon).  He hasn't but he mentioned that he's going to run the Devil of the Highlands trail race of 43 miles which I guess might be even tougher - the record is 5 hours 22 mins and 54 secs. and there's s time limit of 12 hours!  What's so inspiring is that he runs things like that off HIT training and told me that he never runs more than about 7 miles in his normal training sessions.  That's mitochondrial optimisation for you!

NanoSecond's picture
NanoSecond
Posts: 607
Joined: Oct 2012

Tossing them bait? Of course you must realize that I was just tossing them some red meat.  I now have plently to toss around due to my diet.  :)

Thanks for the follow-up.  I am glad my rowing idea has merit.

I should point out what I have been doing so far though.  Aside from walking at least 1 hour each day (which I know does not count).

At the risk of touchy history - my wife and I starting taking Irish Dancing Lessons.  This is my little inside joke directed to my metastatic femur buddies.  Just my way of trying to thub my nose at 'em, so to speak.

Of course they now get the last laugh watching me on the dance floor. I have rudely discovered I can't even count to 3, let alone 8.

Tres embarassing.

 

Texas_wedge's picture
Texas_wedge
Posts: 2807
Joined: Nov 2011

Well, having elected not to fête your meat, prepare to meet your fate!

The Irish Dancing is a great idea - good exercise and I bet it's a lot of fun too.

one putt
Posts: 72
Joined: Sep 2012

Neal, I have no problem with you being our caddie. My only problem is with your choice of exercise. My wiife,Alice, already spends a good portion of the day dancing around the center island in our kitchen to all types of music. Now she thinks Irish dancing sounds like fun??? Oh well, maybe my Irish Jig will be better than my power fade.

NanoSecond's picture
NanoSecond
Posts: 607
Joined: Oct 2012

Gosh, I am still trying to figure out what the difference is between a Jig and and a Reel...

The whole enterpirse is about as hard as learning how to gauge a good chip shot.  But then again, if you and Alice can master it in your kitchen* then you I should think you will be fully prepared for a most memorable victory dance when you score your next Hole-In-One.  :)

 

*[Extra credit awarded for mastering any steps on top of your butcher-block.]

Texas_wedge's picture
Texas_wedge
Posts: 2807
Joined: Nov 2011

Oh the images that abound, of the Reel Neil practising chip shots on the dance floor, Alice dancing round the island, singing, and John rehearsing his power fade in Alice's Restaurant - and that's just for starters!

Thing about golf: it sure takes your mind off cancer for a bit.

roaddr23's picture
roaddr23
Posts: 77
Joined: Jan 2013

Here goes, this is my second go round with RCC as my new friends will tell you. I am sort of a tell it like it is person. My RCC definitely has a hereditery factor to it as my paternal grandmother had her kidney removed in the 50's when she was about 50. She went on to live well into her 80's with no recurrance. In Dec 2002 I was dx with a large tumor in my left kidney (can't remember the cm but basically filled the kidney itself). I had a left nephrectomy, the tumor was encapsulated totally, sent on my way in life with observation for the past 10 yrs. I am a retired Paramedic so I also have medical knowledge. I also love genealogy and when I first diagnosed I just happened to hook up with a guy who came down from my Grandma's direct line and since he was still in Pa I casually asked if he knew if any of our relatives had ever had kidney cancer...he said I was going to twilight zone because he had it when he was 36. He thought it was Viet Nam but now wondered when he heard about me and Grandma. You said your Dad had his kidney removed but you were unable to find out why..my guess would be RCC. That said, it is just my humble opinion and is directed only for good for you. That is why we are here..and it so strange the parallels I see with you and me, LOL....Anyway, as a medic I obviously totally abused my back as nurses so often do to...so for the past three years I have had numbness, cramping, weakness in my left leg and foot...I have extreme pain trying to walk on hard or uneven surfaces and stairs are the pits. My neurologist has been trying to get me set up with surgery for several years but the only thing that showed up on my original myleogram was a small disc bulge at L4...no one would do the surgery..We were both so frustrated because my symptoms are classic for impingement etc in Lumbar spine...so in Sept we decided to do another myleogram...had it the same day Hurricane Sandy showed up...I always have a copy of the a report sent to my Primary Care Dr. regardless of who ordered the test. As soon as she received the report she had her office call and told me to come in that week...the spinal scan showed two possible lesions in my right and only kidney..she sent me for a sono that confirmed them and they suggested a CT...at this point I was leaving for 10 days for my cabin in VT for Thanksgiving..she said they would get the CT approved while I was gone...well, on the way home from VT to MD I got extremely sick (and being a medical person I naturally knew I could ride it out...don't we always, LOL) Well after a few days I knew I had to get to the DR and like you I was admitted to hospital for severe diverticulitis...something I never had before and hope never to have again...in the ER they told me they needed to do abdominal CT so I reminded them about the lesions and they included them in their exam of the CT also. I was in the hospital for 4 days. They did confirm the tumors were more than likely RCC but at least still small..but if it looks like a duck and walks like a duck it probably is one...they hooked me up with an awesome Urology Oncologist I saw as soon as I got out..he pretty much agreed with the finding but wanted me to have a 2nd opinion and he said he wanted me to see the Dr that was the best of the best in robotic surgery to see if my tumors could be removed and still have a functioning kidney etc.  So now I am faced with a very serious dilemma..I am 62 yo, right now my only kidney is functioning fine..do we watch the tumors and see if they grow or start to effect my kidney function or do we do surgery and hope all goes well but I know that the risks are the kidney not functioning well after surgery,approx 1% chance I could end up on dialysis or even need a transplant...it was a lot to consider. When I met with the surgeon he was awesome and he said one thing to me that above all else made me opt for the surgery...even though they are very small and appear encapsulated..small tumors can rupture just as easily as larger ones..they were in a good place and he said get them out now because it will cause the least trauma to your kidney and give you the best odds for it to function normally...So here I am..almost a month post op...(Surgery was Feb 8 & I went home Feb 9) Knock on wood my kidney is functioning great...pissing like a racehorse as the saying goes...You are lucky to have two kidneys and with surgery you could still wind up with say 1 and 3/4....I hope you are right and it isn't RCC but I feel like God or whatever people want to refer has allowed me to beat this monster twice for a reason...Kidney Cancer Awareness is what I want to bring to table and teach people about and get it out there like Breast and Colon Cancer and I especially want to focus on the possible hereditery aspect...hopefully fight so that people who are predisposed to it can get routine checks like colonoscopies and mammagrams etc...covered by insurance...I am going to be straight forward and honest with you...have the surgery and then get on down the road with your life...We need good nurses and I can tell you are one...My Dad died this Past May 8 from Stage 3 Pancreatic Cancer...from Feb til he died my sister and I cared for him..She is 56 and she was in her last semester of Nursing School, doing clinicals and working full time and somehow she made and graduated on May 23..She is now an ER Nurse at the same ER she worked as a Unit Clerk for 20 years...She is this kind of Nurse I would want for my family and you sound a lot like her...we need you out...this is just a minor blip in things...I know it is hard for us tough girls to think about ourselves(really, really hard, LOL) but sometimes we just have to do what we have to do...I hope only the best for you no matter your decision...Wink

pinkstar's picture
pinkstar
Posts: 53
Joined: Mar 2013

1st I would like to thank all of you for your advice!!! It really does reiterate what I know I need to do. 2nd Roaddr...thank you for your reply. I think my biological dad really has something to do with all this. I am pretty much in tune with my body & I know this has something to do with him. What you said about your grandma rang true to my heart & gave me hope. I keep looking for a 30 year survivor & can't find one. My dad died from CHF which had nothing to do with the fact he had 1 kidney. As far as I know he never was on dialysis nor did 1 kidney ever hold him back from his crazy lifestyle. Your kind words and story really give me hope. I am definitely anxious for surgery & getting this d*mn thing out of my  body for good! Living with having it sit inside in my body, hasn't been easy. Without insurance, I was very limited & now that I do have insurance, I am just waiting to secure my current job. I have less than 2 months left & can't wait to get it over with.

LKidd
Posts: 37
Joined: Feb 2013

Pinkstar - Hi, I had posted a comment on your thread under Lkidd. It was mostly regarding your choice to have a biopsy if you or your doctor or both are in doubt if its RCC or cancer at all. I was in the same doubt and did opt for the biopsy. I was told the risk is so extremely low and due to the doubt both my doctor and I had, we forged ahead with it. My biopsy was Monday 3/4. It was not pleasant and was tough, you can read about that under Lkidd also if you would like. But I just got results on Thursday 3/7. It is benign. It's an Angiomyolipoma. A benign harmless tumor. Usually they don't grow or grow very slowly and no intervention needs to be taken. Sometimes they grow to 6cm or more. In that case I would have to take it out anyway due to possible bleeding and rupturing which poses a danger. So I have to scan in 1 year to determine the growth rate, then employ a plan to monitor it accordingly. I thought I would let you know since you had doubt also. Good luck to you, I do hope everything turns out well.

LKidd
Posts: 37
Joined: Feb 2013

Pinkstar - Hi, I had posted a comment on your thread under Lkidd. It was mostly regarding your choice to have a biopsy if you or your doctor or both are in doubt if its RCC or cancer at all. I was in the same doubt and did opt for the biopsy. I was told the risk is so extremely low and due to the doubt both my doctor and I had, we forged ahead with it. My biopsy was Monday 3/4. It was not pleasant and was tough, you can read about that under Lkidd also if you would like. But I just got results on Thursday 3/7. It is benign. It's an Angiomyolipoma. A benign harmless tumor. Usually they don't grow or grow very slowly and no intervention needs to be taken. Sometimes they grow to 6cm or more. In that case I would have to take it out anyway due to possible bleeding and rupturing which poses a danger. So I have to scan in 1 year to determine the growth rate, then employ a plan to monitor it accordingly. I thought I would let you know since you had doubt also. Good luck to you, I do hope everything turns out well.

pinkstar's picture
pinkstar
Posts: 53
Joined: Mar 2013

Hi...Wow!!! That is wonderful news for you. Doing a biopsy was not an option, due to the possibility of malignancy. Definitely something to think about & really I wouldn't be surprised.

Thank you for your reply!!

Donna

LKidd
Posts: 37
Joined: Feb 2013

Hi Pinkstar - Thanks. It was wonderful news. I don't understand you saying it's not an option, it's always an option. My 1st opinion doc said he would not do a biopsy, he recommended open kidney surgery removing my kidney, and said the biopsy has a risk because if it's cancer it can spread it. My 2nd opinion do said the risk is there too, but since there was doubt (Like you have) that it is cancer at all, he said not only would he take that risk, but the risk is extremely low. Of course I am not telling you what you should do. Only you and you alone can make that call, especially given the risks. But mostly I wanted you to know that if malignancy is not confirmed and you and/or your doc have doubts, just an option to look at that is there. I wanted to share my case as I felt it was similar. Thanks Donna, I appreciate the good wishes. I hope your journey goes well.

Leanne

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