CSN Login
Members Online: 18

Life during chemo?

Pamela B's picture
Pamela B
Posts: 108
Joined: Jan 2013

Having my first chemotherapy sessions on Monday and Tuesday.  I know everyone is different but how mobile were you all when you were having your treatments.  Were you able to work, drive, get out socially?  I have this vision of laying around the house all day exhausted but I hope I have the wrong idea!

Mwee's picture
Mwee
Posts: 1316
Joined: Nov 2009

I have (unfortunately) had lots of chemo. I can tell you that different chemo regiments affect each of us differently. Chemo fatique is very real for me. I have to plan out my social life accordingly, but it may not be that way for you. I wish you all the best and know that we'll be right here for you if you have and questions. You can help yourself get through those chemo days much easier by drinking lots and lots of fluids, resting when your tired, and reporting any symptoms to your doctor or chemo nurses.

                                                                                 (((HUGS)))   Maria

ptharp
Posts: 190
Joined: Oct 2012

Hi Pamela: I am going through my first Chemo. I am on Carboplatin and Taxol. I go to Chemo everyweek. I am getting 6 rounds of 3 weeks each. The first week of the round I get Carbo and Taxol. Week 2 and 3 I get just Taxol. I am currently on round 5. The first 3 rounds were not too bad. I was able to drive and have somewhat of a social life. I had lay low on one week of the round because I was more open to infection. The first two rounds I walked outside a little. As the weeks have gone on it has gotten harder. Last week I was home all day exhausted and a little sick to my stomach. I am told this last round is going to kick my butt.  My advise to you is get out and enjoy yourself with your friends and family now. It did not get bad for me until my 5th round. Everyone is different too. It may not be that bad for you. I listen to gals on the same chemo as me and they are having a harder time. I guess it is individual too and what kind of health you are in before Chemo. Good Luck.

lovesanimals's picture
lovesanimals
Posts: 1248
Joined: Sep 2011

I had six rounds of chemo (carboplatin and taxol) every three weeks between December 2010 and March 2011.  For myself, I found that I was extremely fatigued, with constipation and loss of appetite, for about the first five or so days after each round.  After that, I felt a lot better and was feeling really good by the time of the next round.  I worked part-time from home during my good weeks and to this day, I still remind my husband that I even did our income tax returns during my chemo!  To ward off the constipation, I started taking Miralax about two days before the upcoming round and for at least a couple of days after each round.  i was lucky to not experience any nausea probably because my chemo "cocktail" included anti-nausea meds, plus I had anti-nausea pills for home, which I took the first day, to stay ahead of any potential nausea.  The chemo I took caused me to lose my hair, starting about the second or third week in.  I know that the loss of hair is very traumatic to many women.  For me, it was actually not a big deal.  My hair started growing back about five weeks after my last round ended.

Please visit us often and let us know how things are going for you.  Sending lots of good thoughts and prayers to you that you experience minimal side effects and a positive outcome!

Hugs,

Kelly

 

TracieK's picture
TracieK
Posts: 45
Joined: Sep 2008

Pamela B.,

I had peritoneal for stage 3B. I was tired, but functioned well. I felt like I could get out and about, but wanted to stay healthy so I was choosy about where I went. I sure didn't want a little bug from someone else. My entire treatment, I was all about staying in good enough health to have the next one! I got through all 6 rounds with relatively few issues. I am sending prayers that you do as well.

TracieK

ps. It helped me to drink lots of fluids, especially around treatment time!

 

wholfmeister's picture
wholfmeister
Posts: 257
Joined: Dec 2012

First of all, start your Miralax NOW.  And start drinking fluids.  Set a schedule, like 12 ounces every hour.  Start now, don't wait. On Monday, once they get you hooked up, you will be able to move about the center.  You can push your pole to the bathroom, etc.  Afterwards, you have to pace yourself.  I find a combination ofnrestnand activity works best for me. I nap when I first get home, but then I get up and maybe take a walk around the block, then take it easy.  Don't come home and go to bed, but rest as you need it.  I have been able to continue working full-time throughout my chemo.  Except for chemo days, I haven't missed but a few days.  (Haha! But there were days I went to work and didn't do too much! Sshh!

wholfmeister's picture
wholfmeister
Posts: 257
Joined: Dec 2012

Sorry! That posted before I was done. 

Anyway, pace yourself.  Do your meds, push the fluids, move about, and lay low.  Go with the flow, and do what you feel like doing.  Don't make big plans, but just see how it goes.  We are all different.

my first time, I made a huge dish of jello, expecting to be so sick to my stomach.  I had a big smile on my face when I threw out that jello, untouched, a week later!

you will be in my thoughts all Monday.  Can't wait to hear how it goes!

Pamela B's picture
Pamela B
Posts: 108
Joined: Jan 2013

I took the miralax today as suggested.  Just drank more water after I read to start before the actual chemo day.  Have my comfortable, but stylish, clothes ready, a nice tote filled with things to occupy my racing mind during the treatment, plus some Gatorade and vitamin water to take with me. and a long list of questions to ask the nurse!  I think I am ready.  Can you take Xanax before the treatment?  I think I am going to need it.  But, after all the great advice I have received here, I really won't be that nervous after all!  Thanks again ladies.  Your inspirational posts have helped get me to the first hurdle well informed and ready to do battle.  I will let you know how it goes tomorrow.

123Miley's picture
123Miley
Posts: 94
Joined: Jan 2013

Congrats on getting the first treatment under your belt!  Saying congrats sounds sort of weird - but it is one milestone of many that marks your journey to getting and feeling better!

Like some of the other posters have said - it is  sort of a cycle you will get used to.  I was on chemo the first time for 11 months.  1 week on and two weeks off.  I had to discontinue the IP chemo early on due to complications from scar tissue from surgery - but continued taxol and carbo for the 11 months.  I have heard the IP chem can be pretty taxing - but again, as another poster said everyone is different.

I got my treatements on Wednesday and would fell pretty good all day Thursday.  By Friday I started going down hill.  I would basically pass out on that Friday and sleep for most of the weekend.  But other than leaving work early sometimes on that Friday - the only work I missed was the day I was in the clinic getting my infusion.   I would feel weak and tired the following Monday- but improved as the week progressed.  The next week was my best - that is when we planned things with friends, trips etc.  And then back for more chemo!

I  was a regular exerciser and just pretty active in general when I was diagnosed.  And I did what I could to maintain some sort of exercise schedule during my treatments - even if it was just 15-20 minutes of light cardio (a walk around the block even) and a little stretching 2X's a week.  I think that helped me a lot.   

You will have some bad days - and DO NOT feel guilty when you just don't feel like doing much.  But don't totally give in to the fatigue either.  Does that make since?

Good luck with Tuesday - and as another poster said - drink LOTS of water.  That will help minimize a lot of side effects.  You will probably get IV fluids with the IP chemo - but still drink, drink, drink!

Although I was diagnosed over 5 years ago - I am new here as well and find I draw a lot of strength through hearing others stories and experiences!

 

 

 

Subscribe with RSS
About Cancer Society

The content on this site is for informational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider. Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition. Use of this online service is subject to the disclaimer and the terms and conditions.

Copyright 2000-2014 © Cancer Survivors Network