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Some interesting info from my naturopath re "leaky gut" and chemo

annalexandria's picture
annalexandria
Posts: 2320
Joined: Oct 2011

Just wanted to throw this out there for any who might be interested.  Went to see my naturopath today to see if she could help with some serious joint pain I've been having.  I developed joint/muscle pain a couple of years ago while on my 2nd round of chemo, but it got really bad back in August, especially in my hands and feet.  I had to start taking Vicodin again after getting off of it for many months (Hi Abrub!  I think you helped me with that, so thanks!), which hasn't even been helping that much.  Saw a rheumatologist, as my GP thought I may have developed some kind of autoimmune disorder, tried three different NSAIDs (including celebrex, just FYI), all of which gave me horrible digestive side effects.  So I got tested for food allergies, which showed I was having an off-the-charts reaction to whey (which means I have to cut out lactose...crushing, as I basically live on cheese).  Anyway, this is what I found interesting, as it applies to us cancer folk...

She said that chemo breaks down the lining of our digestive system (I can hear you all saying "duh" out there).

Normally, a healthy gut is impermeable, nothing can leak out.  But a chemo-damaged gut can leak proteins from the food we eat into the rest of the body, which then reacts to these perceived "invaders" by creating antibiodies (which is what is expressed in the high levels of my food allergy test).  The antibodies remove the proteins from the critical core of your body out to the less important extremities...which would explain all the pain in my hands and feet.  And you don't tend to develop these problems with something you only eat once in a while.  It's the daily foods (like my morning english muffin with cheese) that tend to be the biggest issue, because your body is getting a lot of practice at producing those specific antibodies, over and over again.

This may all be old news to many of you, but it was a new way of looking at things for me.  Kind of frustrating to learn yet another aspect of how chemo is the "gift that keeps on giving" (not to put down chemo, as it's keeping many of us alive for years!), but it did give me hope too. My naturopath said "we can fix this", and I was glad to hear that.  I would love to be able to hike this summer, and at the moment, I can barely take a 15 minute walk.  So all lactose is going out the door (don't know what I'm going to eat for breakfast), as well as gluten.  More food may follow.  I love to eat, so it's going to be an interesting process.  AA

abrub's picture
abrub
Posts: 1540
Joined: Mar 2010

You might want to try a supplement called "GI Revive".  Its function is to restore the mucosal lining of the gut.  I was given it a year out of chemo by an integrative med dr, and it restored my gut function to perfectly normal.  I used it for a month.  You might want to ask if it is okay to use while undergoing chemo, tho you might need it on an ongoing basis until chemo is done.

It comes in a powder (1 tsp/day, sprinkled on food like applesauce) or as capsules (7 capsules once a day).  I preferred the capsules, as I didn't like the flavor of the powder.  Most people like the powder.

The contents are all supplements known to sooth and maintain the lining of the gut.  It's certainly worth asking about.

http://www.totaldiscountvitamins.com/product/4365/designs_for_health

annalexandria's picture
annalexandria
Posts: 2320
Joined: Oct 2011

My naturopath has me starting on glutamine capsules twice a day.  I wonder if the GI revive has that in it?  Anyway, I get my stuff for free from her, as she's a friend, so that's a good deal.  AA

abrub's picture
abrub
Posts: 1540
Joined: Mar 2010

Contents of GI Revive Powder
* L-Glutamine 1500 mg
* N-Acetyl Glucosamine 1000 mg
* Citrus Pectin 1000 mg
* Deglycyrrhizinated Licorice (DGL) (Glycyrrhiza glabra) 400 mg
* Aloe Vera (Leaf Extract 200:1) 300 mg
* Slippery Elm (bark)(Ulmus pulmila) 200 mg
* Mucin 200 mg
* Marshmallow (root)(Althea officinalis) 100 mg
* Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla) 100 mg
* Okra (pod) (Hibiscus esculentus) 100 mg
* Cat's Claw (TOA free) (bark)(Uncaria tomentosa) 100 mg
* Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) 100 mg
* Quercetin 100 mg
* Prunus (Concentrate) 100 mg
Other Ingredients: Black tea, natural peach flavor, xylitol, lecithin, erythritol, maltitol, stevia and talin.

 

~Alice

ron50's picture
ron50
Posts: 1318
Joined: Nov 2001

Many O f my friends over the years would credit me with a leaky gut but unfortunately my arhtritis is long term. I have been on nsaids for close to thirty years. My uric acid is always high and initially I was dxed with gouty arthritis , In the last few years they have checked a little further and have changed the dx to psoriatic arthritis. I was on 75 mg daily of prednisone for nearly 18 mos when they first dxed kidney problems. When I weaned off the pred I nearly died from the arthritis.Not literally but I was ready to shoot myself the pain was so bad.Ron.

annalexandria's picture
annalexandria
Posts: 2320
Joined: Oct 2011

have you considered adding sour cherry juice to your diet?  Could probably do dried cherries too, they just have to be the tart kind.  I was taking it because i had heard it helps with joint pain, but my doc said not to bother unless my uric acid was high (which it isn't).  My dad took it for a gout and got some relief.  Might be worth a try.  I've also read about eating raisins soaked in gin.  I'm thinking I could drink the gin afterwards, which seems like a win-win for me.  AA

tanstaafl's picture
tanstaafl
Posts: 1013
Joined: Oct 2010

Tart cherries' extract appears to be a good COX2 inhibitor which could help a lot with the pain.  My wife has usually had this in her formula.

pete43lost_at_sea's picture
pete43lost_at_sea
Posts: 3915
Joined: Nov 2010

godbless you, its about time, more of us shared what we learned.

the more we share together, the more learn, the better our chances.

 

bigs,

hugs,

pete

janie1
Posts: 753
Joined: Apr 2011

Thanks for sharing, Ann. I like naturopaths more and more.
I know you will be hiking again. I am joining you....and then a cold beer (no gluten beer, no cheese).

annalexandria's picture
annalexandria
Posts: 2320
Joined: Oct 2011

is gluten and dairy free.  As is vermouth.  And we all know olives are good, so I'm set.  Will meet you at the top of the trail with a flask in one hand and a six pack in the other!Laughing 

Sundanceh's picture
Sundanceh
Posts: 4339
Joined: Jun 2009

There are just so many things to be taken for granted, aren't there?

Colocan released an article not too long ago about the benefits of Milk and its role in the cancer fight...I know that many are lactose intolerant as a result of the fight.

What I found interesting and highly promising about that was the role that Milk played in delaying cell death, which allowed the body some time to repair the DNA in that cell.

A light went off for me...I drank alot of milk during my chemo treatments...and I still consume quite abit of it.

While the article never said that Milk would cure cancer...it discussed the benefits of slowing down the cancer process to allow the body to repair the DNA of the cell...it was like Eureka or something.

I've often wondered if Milk is somehow playing an important role for me...as just another adjuvant?

I congratulate you on your findings and wishing you nothing but the best as you transition towards the next step.

-Craig

 

annalexandria's picture
annalexandria
Posts: 2320
Joined: Oct 2011

I've been a regular milk drinker too.  I drink it on a daily basis.  But have to give it up now, along with cheese.  Hopefully that won't turn out to be the one thing keeping the cancer at bay!  Everything is so complicated when it comes to this disease...AA

Chelsea71
Posts: 1170
Joined: Sep 2012

It is so frustrating. I have driven myself crazy over the years trying to figure out what foods and vitamins will help Steve. First with the ulcerative colitis and now with the cancer. Just when we think we might be onto something, we get new information that were doing the wrong thing. So many contradictions. I'm really sad that you have to give up cheese. I love it too.

tanstaafl's picture
tanstaafl
Posts: 1013
Joined: Oct 2010

Probably trying to reduce the tyrosine content of your diet.  What protein sources, food and supplemental, are suggested?

annalexandria's picture
annalexandria
Posts: 2320
Joined: Oct 2011

I guess I can eat beans?  Quinoa?  Would those provide the same nutirents?  And meat as well.  No eggs, due to an allergic reaction, which is also depressing.  Have no idea what I'm going to eat for breakfast!

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