CSN Login
Members Online: 9

I don't handle medical issues well (woozy)

disneyfan2008
Posts: 5520
Joined: Oct 2010

I get very woozy when Drs talk anything (or I hear or see) medical. I got good news at POST surgery check up yesterday-but on way out started to really sweat and turned white. They called a nurse to come out. The Dr didnt' give graphic details=just said my 'spot" was very close to ribs & I had LOTS of scar tissue. They never found the clip they put in-so not sure if in my muscles. I HAVE no visiable stitches ****which is my worse thing to handle***
So this is 2nd time at this Dr office I am sure they will remember me...heeh..

2 yrs ago OUT cold on ground when the Dr took few stitched out of finger (surgery for arthritis)

Denise

CypressCynthia's picture
CypressCynthia
Posts: 4017
Joined: Oct 2009

Denise, many folks here either have always had "white coat syndrome" or have developed it after all of the scary cancer issues and treatments. I never was like that, but I sort of am now :-(.

My only advice is to 1) warn your healthcare providers that you have this problem and 2) take a loved one with you. When I was first diagnosed and would come home teary-eyed, my mother-in-law called my family (she is great at bossing ;-)) and asked if there was someone who could accompany me to appointments. For once, her interference was very helpful, because my family made sure that I didn't go alone for some time and I don't think it even occurred to me to ask (I was so overwhelmed).

It didn't stop me from crying when docs shared bad or scary news, but it did really, really help to have the support.

As to the clips, I am not sure??? I have clips that still show up on xray after 25 years, but was told that they are completely normal.

Internal scar tissue is weird. Having attended hundreds of C-sections, I can tell you that there is absolutely no way of telling who has those adhesions (internal scarring) until the surgeon gets in there. Adhesion-formers are much more difficult and risky to do surgeries on and, whether you get them or not, has nothing to do with technique. It almost looks like the body has gone into overdrive and, instead of healing in a clean and normal way, jumbles and tangles internal tissues while healing.

Make sure that you let surgeons know that you have a history of adhesions, because it may be helpful to have an extra surgeon present if you have a history of this, depending on the surgery.

disneyfan2008
Posts: 5520
Joined: Oct 2010

Thanks for the reply...I tell all Drs only tell me what you have to...I just had dental surgery and implant (long ordeal) this year. I had them knock me out cold...said DO NOT Tell me or show me anything. I had surgery on my right hand awake..i warned the dr (who had done 2 shoulder surgeries on me) and freaked out..then my left hand he kncoked me out..but I passed out in office when took stitches out..

this all started when I was 12 I had very bad bike accident-plastic surgeon-year later while I was awake (as kid) did surgery on my face to get tar from under skin from year before..from that day forward ...no good..

Nurse came running out at last appt. said next time someone should come with you..I said all GOOD news, great, wonderful I would feel silly..

Denise

CypressCynthia's picture
CypressCynthia
Posts: 4017
Joined: Oct 2009

I have not one to push an anti-anxiety med such as xanax, but it might be really helpful for you to take something before you go to your doctor's visit. It sounds like you have a serious healthcare phobia left over from your teen trauma? I would not hesitate to see a psychiatrist and a psychologist for this, because with desensitization therapy and a few meds and you might suffer so much less. I hate that you are going through this! Big hugs and I'm praying it gets better soon!

Subscribe with RSS
About Cancer Society

The content on this site is for informational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider. Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition. Use of this online service is subject to the disclaimer and the terms and conditions.

Copyright 2000-2014 © Cancer Survivors Network