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~*~BREAST CANCER???~*~?

justin_Cook
Posts: 6
Joined: Oct 2012

I really need to ask some questions. My daughter is 12 and when she started to develop breasts I started to notice 1 lump almost the size of her boob, but in both of them. Since there was one in both I thought it was normal. But I asked my friend about it, and she said her daughter didn't have a lump in the middle of her breast, and she's more developed then mine daughter, so I started to think about breast cancer, but can girls of this age get it? And having one lump in both of your breasts normal?????

HELP!!!!!!!!!!!!
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abrub's picture
abrub
Posts: 1528
Joined: Mar 2010

and starting to develop. At my annual checkup, my pediatrician felt my breasts (the nerve of him!) and commented on the lumps that were there - they were the "breast buds". However, he had the inconsiderate way of describing them as "Cheerios", much to my mother's amusement, and my devastation. (Mom came home to announce to the world, i.e. my father, that I have "Cheerios" - I wanted to die.)

But back on point, the start of breast development does include lumps and bumps, and if they are in both breasts, it is probably breast buds.Sounds normal to me (I only remember it because I was traumatized by my dr and my mother!) You can always ask her dr.

I hope this helps.

Alice

Gabe N Abby Mom's picture
Gabe N Abby Mom
Posts: 2415
Joined: Sep 2010

Please take your daughter to a doc. It is likely all a very normal part of development. but you should have the comfort of knowing that.

And it is never too early to teach your daughter about monthly self exams (which should include a visual check along with palpation.) This is also a good opportunity to talk about all that girly growth and development stuff. The doc can show her/talk with her in a clinical way about how to do the exam, they can compare notes about what they find in the exam. Let the doc know before the visit that this is what you want, that way they can set aside more time. (I've also found that nurse practitioners will take more time.) This way, your daughter will know exactly what to look for...and you will have some reassurance that all is well.

For my daughter (she's 11) because she was/is shy and embarrassed about all this stuff, I picked out a good thorough book at the library. Then i had her read it, and then we talked about what she read. They were reluctant conversations, but I could tell that she really wanted to know. And of course, stuff still comes up that we need to discuss...

Best wishes,

Linda

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