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Have a question for my dad

angel6122
Posts: 28
Joined: Aug 2012

I posted yesterday on my dads esophagus cancer and got some great advice. However, I have some more questions please. MY dad is going in Friday to have a port put in for his chemo treatments and also suppose to have a feeding tube put in. He was in the hospital all day today for dehydration he has been unable to even have liquids for almost a week, today was the second time in the hospital for Iv fluid. He is concerned on which one to go with the stent or J-tube. His Dr. said he has had great success with the stent but from reading about it seems there are a lot of problems are the problems with the stent the same as with the J-tube? I was wondering what everyone else thinks is better. His Dr also said he could have him eating the next day is this true you think? Also saw some one mention the G-tube but had not heard of that. My dad needs to make a decision by tomorrow as his surgery for either the stent or J-tube is Friday.
Hugs to everyone

Amjosmom's picture
Amjosmom
Posts: 231
Joined: Jun 2012

Tumors can grow into the stents making them impossible to remove. I'm only going by what I've learned here, but a g-tube goes into the stomach and the j-tube goes into the lower intestine. J-tube is most likely the better option. I'm the sure someone with more experience will chime in soon. Anyway... no stent, and j-tube.

Best wishes,
Jayme

angel6122
Posts: 28
Joined: Aug 2012

Thank you Jayne the more i read the more I see people say negative things about the stent, I think the reason why my dad wants it so he can eat but If the problems are that bad I will let him know. I am so afraid to give him the wrong advice so I really appreciate all of you so much.

Ladylacy
Posts: 474
Joined: Apr 2012

I know my Aunt had the j-tube and if I remember correctly had to have it replaced once in about 3 1/2 years during her fight with EC before passing. She didn't have a stent but did have a pick(?) line and had trouble with infections.

Now my husband has a PEG tube (second time). First time he had one for about 16 months and had no problems. This time he has had one since May and so far no problems with it. Both times he had no problems keeping his nutrition down either.

Sharon

angel6122
Posts: 28
Joined: Aug 2012

It seems the more I read I see different treatments for feeding tubes, So there is a J-tube, G-tube, Peg tube and also a stent? So confusing. I think my dad may just want the stent so he can eat he hasn't eaten anything in a couple of weeks. But think I will let him know this is not the way to go. I will try to find out more about the Peg tube as well, but if any one has any advice on that would love to hear it. Also is the stent only for people who are NOT having surgery?

Amjosmom's picture
Amjosmom
Posts: 231
Joined: Jun 2012

Stents are just to prop the esophagus open. They may work for a bit to aid in eating, but I've read so many ugly stories about tumor growth in, through and around them that I personally would steer clear of them. The j-tube will allow your dad to get the nutrients he needs to rebuild his strength to be able to tolerate chemo and or radiation to HOPEFULLY shrink the tumor. If he wants to eat long term, tell him feeding tube, rebuild strength, chemo/rad, eat. It's a process that takes time. Don't rush the stent! GET THE FACTS!!!

Best wishes!
Jayme

P.S. Not familiar with PEG tube, but haven't researched it either...

cher76's picture
cher76
Posts: 302
Joined: Nov 2010

My husband, stage IV ec, was treated at MDAnderson Houston, and had a PFG (percutaneous fluoroscopic gastrostomy)feeding tube placed using fluoroscopy. Since he was Stage IV and not a candidate for surgery, and not having a laparoscopy to look at nodes or anything, this was the least invasive way to go. The procedure lasted about 30 minutes and he was awake the whole time. The tubing is much smaller than the one they had shown us for a PEG tube,only stuck out about 3 or 4 inches from his abdomen, and was totally unnoticable under his shirts. The care at the insertion site was simple and it healed up completely and he did not even have to wear a bandage over it. During the healing process a small tunnel is created by the body around the tubing and after 6 weeks it was healed so well that he was able to go swimming. We never had any problems with the actual feedings, no vomiting, diahhrea, or anything, knock on wood! The only drawback in the beginning was that it was gravity fed and could take up to an hour to feed a can of formula. He was still able to eat by mouth somewhat so we only used it to supplement his eating. It only got clogged once in the 9months he had it and that was because we forgot to flush it when he was through with a feeding. Eventually we began using it with a kangaroo pump, and we're able to take 3 to 4 cans in an hour. I have found very few people who have had this kind of feeding tube and am beginning to think that maybe MDAnderson is the only one using it, but it was wonderful. In the end when Rickie could no longer take in even water because of the extreme regrowth of the tumors, the feeding tube kept him alive. He survived for two months longer. We had 5 doctors give their opinions that this type of tube inserted into his stomach would be better than a j tube which goes directly into the intestine. It worked for us and gave him the nutrition he so badly needed.
Cheryl
Wife of Rickie, dx Stage IV EC, Oct 2010 with mets to bones
Brain mets dx Oct. 2011
Lost the battle, Jan. 4, 2012

JanBred
Posts: 42
Joined: Jul 2012

I asked my Radiation Oncologist about a stent, and he said that most of them end up in the stomach. Just an FYI.

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